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291 - 300 of 321 results for: SOC

SOC 368W: Workshop: China Social Science (POLISCI 448R)

For Ph.D. students in the social sciences and history. Research on contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

SOC 369: Social Network Methods (EDUC 316)

Introduction to social network theory, methods, and research applications in sociology. Network concepts of interactionist (balance, cohesion, centrality) and structuralist (structural equivalence, roles, duality) traditions are defined and applied to topics in small groups, social movements, organizations, communities. Students apply these techniques to data on schools and classrooms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

SOC 370A: SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

Restricted to Sociology doctoral students with preference to first year students.The traditions of structural analysis derived from the work of Marx, Weber, and related thinkers. Antecedent ideas in foundational works are traced through contemporary theory and research on political conflict, social stratification, formal organization, and the economy.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Jackson, M. (PI)

SOC 370B: Social Interaction and Group Process

Theoretical strategies for the study of interaction, group, and network processes, including rational choice and exchange theory, the theory of action, symbolic interactionism, formal sociology, and social phenomenology. Antecedent ideas in foundational works and contemporary programs of theoretical research.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

SOC 372: Theoretical Analysis and Research Design

Restricted to Sociology Doctoral students only and required for Ph.D. in Sociology. This seminar is designed to deepen students¿ understanding of the epistemological foundations of social science, the construction and analysis of theories, and the design of empirical research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

SOC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 7071), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit (up to 297 units total)

SOC 375W: Workshop: Politics, Morality, and Hierarchy

Advanced research workshop with a focus on new theory and research, recent publications, and current research by faculty and graduate student participants. Topics of relevant research include, but are not restricted to, morality, cooperation, solidarity, politics, status, and power. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 376: Perspectives on Organization and Environment: Social Movement Organizations and Environments

This course examines the interaction between organizations and their environments. It is given every year by a different faculty member. What follows is the description of the course for the academic year 2012-13: This research seminar explores recent theory and research on social movement organizations and their environments. We'll consider the way in which organizational theories help us to explain social movement phenomena, and the way in which social movement theories help us to explain organizational phenomena.
Last offered: Autumn 2012

SOC 376A: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This graduate level seminar is the first of an intensive two-quarter-long course in ethnographic and fieldwork methods. Students will receive hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of fieldwork. This begins by learning how to critically engage ethnographic and qualitative books and articles. Next, students will become acquainted with field research techniques and issues through a number of class exercises. Students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, crafting memos, and executing various modes of analyses. Finally, students will begin conducting their own fieldwork research in a field site of their choosing. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in the field, write and submit formal field notes, and craft a final paper that analyzes their fieldwork data. Class session will be divided in two parts. First, students will discuss the readings and topics of the week. The remainder of the class will be devoted to discussing research experiences and/or analyzing fellow students' field notes. Students should anticipate producing an article or chapter length research paper by the end of the second quarter of the class.nnPriority given to Graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020

SOC 376B: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This graduate level seminar is the first of an intensive two-quarter-long course in ethnographic and fieldwork methods. Students will receive hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of fieldwork. This begins by learning how to critically engage ethnographic and qualitative books and articles. Next, students will become acquainted with field research techniques and issues through a number of class exercises. Students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, crafting memos, and executing various modes of analyses. Finally, students will begin conducting their own fieldwork research in a field site of their choosing. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in the field, write and submit formal field notes, and craft a final paper that analyzes their fieldwork data. Class session will be divided in two parts. First, students will discuss the readings and topics of the week. The remainder of the class will be devoted to discussing research experiences and/or analyzing fellow students¿ field notes. Students should anticipate producing an article or chapter length research paper by the end of the second quarter of the class.nnPriority given to Graduate students¿
Last offered: Spring 2020
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