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171 - 180 of 310 results for: SOC

SOC 236B: Advanced Topics in Sociology of Law (SOC 136B)

(Same as LAW 538.) Historical perspectives on the origins of law, rationality and legal sanctions, law on the books versus the law in action, crime and deviance, school desegregation, privitization of prisons, American civil rights, file sharing, jury decision making, the role of lawyers and judges, and cynicism about the American legal system.
Last offered: Winter 2010

SOC 238: Market Oriented Policies in Education (EDUC 238)

Introducing market dynamics in education remains a highly controversial policy issue. In this course we will discuss the main ideas supporting the market approach in education and the key arguments against these policies; we will also review some of the evidence concerning the effects of market policies in education such as privatization, vouchers, and school choice; and finally, we will study several issues related to market oriented reforms, such as performance accountability, school segregation, and peer effects in education.
Last offered: Spring 2020

SOC 240: Introduction to Social Stratification (SOC 140)

(Graduate students register for 240.) The main classical and modern explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political inequality. Issues include: power; processes that create and maintain inequality; the central axes of inequality in contemporary societies (race, ethnicity, class, and gender); the consequences of inequality for individuals and groups; and how social policy can mitigate and exacerbate inequality. Cases include technologically simple groups, the Indian caste system, and the modern U.S.
Last offered: Spring 2016

SOC 240W: CPI Seminar (SOC 340W)

A workshop devoted to presenting ongoing research on poverty and inequality in the United States. Open to all students interested in (a) building a better infrastructure for monitoring poverty and inequality, (b) building cutting-edge models of the causes and consequences of poverty and inequality, and (b) building better policy to reduce poverty and inequality. Required for all National Poverty Fellows funded by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. May be repeat for credit starting 8/1/2016.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Repeatable for credit

SOC 241: Monitoring the Crisis (PSYCH 145A, PUBLPOL 141, SOC 141, URBANST 149)

A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbW more »
A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbWMGw/viewformnnThe course is open to students who have taken it in earlier quarters, with repeating students allowed to omit the training sessions and, in lieu of those sessions, complete additional field work and writing. Field work will include unique interviews with new participants each lab period, along with corresponding coding, analyses, and reports.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

SOC 241P: Public Interest Tech: Case Studies (SOC 141P)

What does public interest technology look like in practice? Each week, a guest speaker will present a case study of their work to improve government and public systems through innovative methods, data-driven efforts, emerging technology, and human-centered design. Students will reflect on the practicalities, ethics, and best practices of public interest technology work.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Repeatable 16 times (up to 16 units total)

SOC 242: Sociology of Gender (FEMGEN 142, FEMGEN 242, SOC 142)

Male, female, woman, man, feminine, masculine. We all know what gender is, right? In this course, we will critically examine the idea of gender from a sociological perspective. For the first few weeks, we will tackle the big question 'What is gender?' To do this, we will begin by interrogating taken-for-granted ideas about the biological underpinnings of gender. We then dive into sociological conceptions of gender. In the latter portion of the course we will examine the ways gender operates and produces inequality within a variety of societal institutions, including the media, the family, the workplace, and the legal system. This class will expose you to some of the methods social scientists use to study gender and help you think critically about common sense understandings of gender through a look at both popular journalism and rigorous academic research. The emphasis of this class is to leave you with a long-lasting understanding of why the study of social problems, and especially those related to gender, matter.
Last offered: Spring 2018

SOC 244: Inequality and the Workplace (SOC 144)

How characteristics of workplaces, such as hiring practices, workforce diversity, organizational policies and legal mandates, produce variation in inequality. Examines the sources, extent, and consequences of workplace inequality across gender, racial and ethnic lines. Topics include earnings, social status, geographical location, and opportunities for people in the workforce.
Last offered: Autumn 2009

SOC 245: Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA (CSRE 145, SOC 145)

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 246A: Ethnographies of Race, Crime, and Justice (SOC 346A)

This course provides graduate students with a survey introduction to influential ethnographic and interview-based sociological research on race, crime, and justice. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass criminalization in the U.S. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal legal system in defining race in America. Each week, students will read ethnographic books and journal articles on the role of race and racism in different dimensions of the criminal legal process from policing to court processing to incarceration written in the early twentieth century to the present. In addition to gaining foundational knowledge on the key debates within the sociological and criminological literature, students will also gain important insight into the most rigorous qualitative social science methods for studying these topics, and how these methods have changed over time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Clair, M. (PI)
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