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1 - 10 of 21 results for: SOC ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives. As of December 31, 2020, this course no longer fulfills the Ways-ED requirement.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 10: Introduction to Computational Social Science

The large-scale digitization of social life is providing new opportunities and research directions for social scientists. In this course, we will discuss how social scientists, and sociologists in particular, are using advances in computational techniques to further our knowledge of society. Some of the topics we will survey include online experiments, massive online social networks, large-scale text analysis, and geographical information systems. Students will learn principles of research design in addition to fundamental programming and data analysis techniques. By the end of the course they should be able to produce computational social science research of their own.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4
Instructors: Hoffman, M. (PI)

SOC 19N: The Immigrant Experience in Everyday Life

The seminar introduces students to major themes connected to the immigrant experience, including identity, education, assimilation, transnationalism, political membership, and intergroup relations. There will also be some attention given to research methodology. The seminar addresses these themes through reading ethnographies that document the everyday experience of immigrants and immigrant communities, broadly defined, in the United States. The course readings primarily come from more contemporary ethnographic research, but it will also include a sampling of ethnographies that examine the experience of previous waves of immigrants. Student participation will include in-class discussions of readings, short written responses to readings, and a final paper in which students draw on original ethnographic research that they conduct during the quarter. By the end of the quarter, students will be able to identify the social, political, and economic forces that shape the immigrant experience. More importantly, students will understand HOW these forces enter the immigrant experience in everyday life.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 21D: Social Movements and the Internet

Over the past few decades, social movements have increasingly relied on social movement participants leveraging internet technologies in mobilization, coordination, and public outreach to assist in their movement goals. How have new online tools such as social media and digital connectivity changed the processes of contemporary social movements? This course uses a sociological perspective to examine the ways social movements have adapted to online technologies to critically think about how the internet has altered traditional forms of social movement mobilization. The first half of the course is an introduction and review of traditional social movement literatures, while the second half is focused on different contemporary social movements where the internet played an important role, including the Arab Spring, Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ equality, feminism and the #MeToo movement, and most recently, the storming of the U.S. Capitol. Students will be encouraged to think about the ways in which social movement processes have been accelerated and/or changed due to the effects of online technologies.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheng, J. (PI)

SOC 128D: Mining Culture Through Text Data: Introduction to Social Data Science

Data science and machine learning have rapidly gained recognition within the social sciences because they offer powerful new ways to ask questions about social and cultural issues. This course will examine how data science has revolutionized how social scientists study culture by providing new tools to analyze patterns in text data in different contexts and at different scales. More specifically, we will explore how these tools can be used to mine the meaning of text from sources such as posts on social media, transcripts of political debates, books, press releases, and more. This is a hands-on, interactive course culminating in a social data science project designed by the student or a team of up to four students. Most class sessions will be taught interactively using Jupyter Notebooks. Students will follow along with workshop-style lectures by using and modifying the provided Python code in real time to analyze data and visualize results. The course will cover such topics as gender a more »
Data science and machine learning have rapidly gained recognition within the social sciences because they offer powerful new ways to ask questions about social and cultural issues. This course will examine how data science has revolutionized how social scientists study culture by providing new tools to analyze patterns in text data in different contexts and at different scales. More specifically, we will explore how these tools can be used to mine the meaning of text from sources such as posts on social media, transcripts of political debates, books, press releases, and more. This is a hands-on, interactive course culminating in a social data science project designed by the student or a team of up to four students. Most class sessions will be taught interactively using Jupyter Notebooks. Students will follow along with workshop-style lectures by using and modifying the provided Python code in real time to analyze data and visualize results. The course will cover such topics as gender and racial/ethnic stereotypes, workplace discrimination, climate change, and lifestyles. Students will learn to explore text data with techniques such as word embeddings, topic models, and sentiment analysis, to visualize their results, and to scrape the web (where and when appropriate). Students will gain experience with base Python and tools from libraries useful for data science such as Empath, Gensim, NumPy, Pandas, Scikit-learn, and spaCy.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Stewart, S. (PI)

SOC 133D: Globalization and Social Change

How do we make sense of a world that is becoming increasingly interconnected, and where social problems like climate change, democratization, human rights, and economic stability are increasingly global in their scope? How have international institutions attempted to regulate these processes and maintain social order? Why have recent social and political movements in an increasing number of countries targeted globalization as a source of their society¿s problems? In this course, we will explore how globalization is as an economic, political, and cultural process that shapes major social problems in today¿s world. To do so, we will draw on a range of theories and interdisciplinary research in economics, political science, and sociology.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Furuta, J. (PI)

SOC 184D: Policing in Society: From Precincts to Playgrounds

We are in a moment of great national attention and debate over the role of police in society, with some calling for greater funding and resources to support community policing efforts and others calling for the abolition of the institution in its entirety. In its current form, policing has infused a surprisingly wide variety of other social institutions, ranging from healthcare to education to technology. This course examines the social underpinnings of historical and modern-day policing. We will critically analyze the trends in policing practices in the US through time, and ask how - and to what effect - police have become enmeshed in the social fabric of American life. This class will expose you to some of the methods social scientists use to investigate society's most pressing issues and help you think critically about policing in America through reading, discussing, and critiquing both popular journalism and rigorous academic research. I hope this course challenges you to consider more »
We are in a moment of great national attention and debate over the role of police in society, with some calling for greater funding and resources to support community policing efforts and others calling for the abolition of the institution in its entirety. In its current form, policing has infused a surprisingly wide variety of other social institutions, ranging from healthcare to education to technology. This course examines the social underpinnings of historical and modern-day policing. We will critically analyze the trends in policing practices in the US through time, and ask how - and to what effect - police have become enmeshed in the social fabric of American life. This class will expose you to some of the methods social scientists use to investigate society's most pressing issues and help you think critically about policing in America through reading, discussing, and critiquing both popular journalism and rigorous academic research. I hope this course challenges you to consider the implications of course content beyond the confines of the classroom, leaves you with novel ways of thinking about society, and helps you become a more aware, informed, and active citizen for your future. An additional goal is to help you build proficiency in your analytical skills. With the final project, you will have the opportunity to become a creator of knowledge by collecting and analyzing your own data.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gleit, R. (PI)

SOC 190: Undergraduate Individual Study

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

SOC 191: Undergraduate Directed Research

Work on a project of student's choice under supervision of a faculty member. Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

SOC 192: Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship

Work in an apprentice-like relationship with faculty on an on-going research project. Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)
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