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1 - 10 of 24 results for: PSYCH ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

PSYCH 20N: How Beliefs Create Reality

This seminar will take an interdisciplinary approach to exploring how subjective aspects of the mind (e.g., thoughts, beliefs, and expectations) can fundamentally change objective reality. Over the course of the semester, students will be challenged to think critically about research from psychology, sociology, and medicine, which suggests that what we think, believe and expect plays a significant role in determining our physical health, performance and well-being. Students will explore research on how mindsets about nutrition, exercise, and stress can alter the body's response to those phenomena. Students will also uncover how social interactions with friends, family, colleagues and the media influence the perceived quality and impact of cultural products such as art, music, and fashion. And students will learn about the neurological and physiological underpinnings of the placebo effect, a powerful demonstration of expectation that produces real, healing changes in the body. Finally, more »
This seminar will take an interdisciplinary approach to exploring how subjective aspects of the mind (e.g., thoughts, beliefs, and expectations) can fundamentally change objective reality. Over the course of the semester, students will be challenged to think critically about research from psychology, sociology, and medicine, which suggests that what we think, believe and expect plays a significant role in determining our physical health, performance and well-being. Students will explore research on how mindsets about nutrition, exercise, and stress can alter the body's response to those phenomena. Students will also uncover how social interactions with friends, family, colleagues and the media influence the perceived quality and impact of cultural products such as art, music, and fashion. And students will learn about the neurological and physiological underpinnings of the placebo effect, a powerful demonstration of expectation that produces real, healing changes in the body. Finally, students will have the opportunity to consider real world applications in disciplines including policy, business, medicine, academics, athletics and public health and consider the ethical implications of those applications. Throughout the class active participation and an open mind will be critical to success. The final weeks of class will be dedicated to student designed studies or interventions aimed to further explore the power of self-fulfilling prophecies, placebo effects, and the social-psychological creation of reality.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Crum, A. (PI)

PSYCH 24N: Neuroforecasting

Preference to freshmen. This course explores whether brain activity can be used not only to predict the choices of individuals, but also of separate groups of individuals in the future (e.g., in markets). Questions include how neuroforecasting is possible, whether it can add value to other forecasting tools (e.g., traditional measures like behavioral choice and subjective ratings), and when it extends to different aggregate scenarios. The course is ideal for students that would like to extend neural predictions about individual choice to group choice, and who plan to apply this knowledge in future research.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Knutson, B. (PI)

PSYCH 35: Minds and Machines (CS 24, LINGUIST 35, PHIL 99, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Students must take this course before being approved to declare Symbolic Systems as a major. All students interested in studying Symbolic Systems are urged to take this course early in their student careers. The course material and presentation will be at an introductory level, without prerequisites. If you have any questions about the course, please email symsys1staff@gmail.com.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

PSYCH 50: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

How does our brain give rise to our abilities to perceive, act and think? Survey of the basic facts, empirical evidence, theories and methods of study in cognitive neuroscience exploring how cognition is instantiated in neural activity. Representative topics include perceptual and motor processes, decision making, learning and memory, attention, reward processing, reinforcement learning, sensory inference and cognitive control.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYCH 60: Introduction to Developmental Psychology

Psychological development from birth to adulthood, emphasizing infancy and the early and middle childhood years. The nature of change during childhood and theories of development. Recommended: PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 60A: Introduction to Developmental Psychology Section

Guided observation of children age 2-5 at Bing Nursery School. Corequisite: 60.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 2

PSYCH 70: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (SOC 2)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives. As of December 31, 2020, this course no longer fulfills the Ways-ED requirement.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 108S: Introduction to Social Psychology

This course aims to blend a comprehensive overview of social psychology with in-depth lectures exploring the history of the field, reviewing major findings and highlighting areas of current research. The course will focus on classic studies that have profoundly changed our understanding of human nature and social interaction, and, in turn, have triggered significant paradigm shifts within the field. Some of the topics covered in this class will include: individuals and groups, conformity and obedience, attraction, intergroup relations, and judgment and decision-making. The course, overall, will attempt to foster interest in social psychology as well as scientific curiosity in a fun, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Neumann, E. (PI)
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