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1 - 8 of 8 results for: OSPOXFRD ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

OSPOXFRD 12: Economics and Strategy in Crisis Management

This course will equip students with academic and professional skills necessary for understanding crisis management in the 21st century. This will be approached by drawing on a series of case studies, from the perspective of both firms and public policy actors. Case studies will cover topics spanning fiscal stimulus, monetary policy, welfare policy, strategy, and risk management, and deal with pertinent issues such as COVID-19, the climate emergency, and cyber warfare. It will include excursions and opportunities for student-led interviews which will draw on Thomas's access to public and private sector actors involved in decision making.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crook, T. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 40: Migration, Forced Displacement, and Human Rights

Contemporary life is hard to imagine without migration and mobility. As an almost constant topic in our political discourse, the movement of people across borders is not one of the most policed areas of modern life. This course will introduce you to some of the topics central to understanding the global migration regime and help you to understand how it fits into the broader framework of human rights protection. We will consider various aspects of migration and mobility, including forced displacement, securitization, border controls, immobility, climate change, and queer displacement.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Ritholtz, S. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 52: Shakespeare and Performance

This class is designed to enhance students' understanding of Shakespeare's place in the UK performance (and political landscape) through analysis of landmark productions on British stages and screens. We will apply range of scholarly approaches to these works and their lives on film and in the theatre, including close reading, performance studies, critical race studies, queer studies, and gender studies. Students will be introduced to these methodological frameworks early in the course, and are free to apply any of them in their assignments. Throughout our exploration of these canonical works, we will consider how today's theatre and film makers, as well as their audiences, engage with these plays to make new meanings and interventions in contemporary culture. Central to our discussion will be an interrogation of the place of Shakespeare in contemporary British culture, chiefly through analysis of performances of his plays and those of his contemporaries in major national institutions: more »
This class is designed to enhance students' understanding of Shakespeare's place in the UK performance (and political landscape) through analysis of landmark productions on British stages and screens. We will apply range of scholarly approaches to these works and their lives on film and in the theatre, including close reading, performance studies, critical race studies, queer studies, and gender studies. Students will be introduced to these methodological frameworks early in the course, and are free to apply any of them in their assignments. Throughout our exploration of these canonical works, we will consider how today's theatre and film makers, as well as their audiences, engage with these plays to make new meanings and interventions in contemporary culture. Central to our discussion will be an interrogation of the place of Shakespeare in contemporary British culture, chiefly through analysis of performances of his plays and those of his contemporaries in major national institutions: Shakespeare's Globe, the National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the BBC, and the mainstream film industry. At the same time, however, we will be equally concerned with how marginalised groups, including minority ethnic and queer artists, have turned to Shakespeare's plays in order to reposition his works, and themselves, on the global and political stage. These in-class discussions, supported by study-group preparation, will prepare students for the written assignments, which are designed to allow students to interpret these plays and their theatrical/filmic afterlives, with a particular focus on the social and political implications of staging and screening these plays in today's diverse British society. Each week, students will be expected to have read the set text (a play by either Shakespeare or his contemporaries) and, in one of three 'study groups,' to have engaged with a critical or interpretative response to that text based on assigned reading or viewing (usually a scholarly reading, or a film or theatrical adaptation).
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: McCarthy, H. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 61: Entrepreneurship in the Arts

What is it like to start your own company? Creative industries and arts consulting are often overlooked by those with an entrepreneurial spirit. Changemakers, meanwhile, look onto big arts institutions with exasperation. This course teaches the fundamentals of starting an arts business from the ground up, and offers students a chance to meet successful entrepreneurs in the UK and learn from their experiences
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: McGrath, M. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 66: A Model Island in Practice

This course builds on the concepts explored in 'A Model Island' with cultural engagement activities in Oxford and UK and an individual enquiry into the culture as you experience it on the BOSP Oxford Programme.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

OSPOXFRD 67: Pandemics in Cultural Context

A pandemic is a biological and medical event, but it is also a social one. Medical anthropology studies these intersections and the biosocial and cultural dimensions of health, illness, and disease. This course uses anthropological theory, social science research methods, writing across the humanities, and visual representations to help us understand infectious disease. We will explore broad debates in medical anthropology, though the focus will remain on recent pandemics. In this course, we will explore and unpack many large questions which shape our lives: what is it to be ill? To be healthy? How do we experience and narrate pain and illness, and how might others do so differently? How might health disparities and outcomes be culturally created? In probing these questions, this course will provide students with a framework for critically engaging with discourse on infectious diseases, as well as approaching the social challenges illuminated by the Covid-19 pandemic. Through this course we will learn to approach disease and illness within their specific cultural, political, economic, and ecological contexts.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Parrish, S. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 75: Creative Non-Fiction: Self expression as a means and an end.

The value of writing as a form of self expression and self analysis has been highlighted in recent months. In this course students will embark on an exploration of the practical uses of writing (journalism, therapy, communicating policies) while also cultivating their own writing skills. In this small seminar students will be able to grow their own writing skills with a variety of assignments tailored to their interests, meet other writers and learn how recent global events have changed the employment landscape for a burgeoning wordsmith.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Asfaw, T. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 99: Unsettling Museum Spaces: Decolonisation, Diversity, and Discourse.

The past year has presented serious challenges to those who work in cultural heritage, not only has tourism and site attendance been disrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic, but social justice movements have raised critical awareness of these sites. What is the purpose of the museum? This course explores the ways the British museum sector has adapted and responded to criticism, and analyses the underlying purpose of cultural sites. This course invites students to learn about british history while also learning about objections to its typical portrayal in the public spaces of britain.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Durand, O. (PI)
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