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1 - 6 of 6 results for: ILAC ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ILAC 123A: Resisting Coloniality: Then and Now (COMPLIT 123A)

What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class more »
What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class, gender, ethnicity, and race, and whose effects are still impactful for many groups of people nowadays. Authors may include Isabel Guevara, Catalina de Erauso, el Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, Simón Bolívar, Flora Tristán, Silvina Ocampo, Jorge Luis Borges, and Gabriel García Márquez. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ILAC 126: Latin American Art and Literature: 100 Years of Modernisms (ARTHIST 293A)

This course will explore some of the most important Latin American artists and artistic movements of the last century. We will appreciate and discuss artworks across different media like painting, sculpture, performance, or installations coupled with different literary texts. The artistic movements may include: Antropofagia (Brazil), Mexican Muralism, Tropicalia (Brazil), and Latin American Pop Art. Some of the artists that we will focus on are: Xul Solar (Argentina), Frida Kahlo (Mexico), Cecilia Vicuña (Chile), Adán Vallecillo (Honduras), Allora & Calzadilla (US/Cuba), and Tania Bruguera (Cuba). We will discuss their visual artworks alongside short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, Leonora Carrington, Julio Cortázar, Clarice Lispector, and Ted Chiang. Some guiding questions will be: What is art? What is Latin America? And what we talk about when we talk about Latin American art? Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Soler, C. (PI)

ILAC 131: Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

This course serves as an introduction to Latin American history and culture by exploring six macro-regions: the Southern Cone, the Andes, the Brazilian coast, the Amazonian Rainforest, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica. By looking at documents, works of art, articles, and films, students will acquire familiarity with critical historical and current problems in Latin American societies and practice their academic skills of argumentation and presentation in Spanish. This course will pay particular attention to the racial and ethnic struggles of various minority groups for political participation, problems regarding foreign and local extraction of natural resources, and the political disputes between nation-states with their peripheral regions. As part of this course, you will read and watch works created by diverse Latin American authors: indigenous pre-independence leaders (Tupac Amaru II), Cuban modernist poets (José Martí), exiled Chilean documentarists (Patricio Guzmán), and afro-descendent environmental activists (Francia Márquez). Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ILAC 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ILAC 399: Individual Work

For Spanish and Portuguese department graduate students only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ILAC 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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