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1 - 7 of 7 results for: BIOHOPK ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIOHOPK 47: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introducesnstudents to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods & statistical analysis. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will learn how to formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to the planet¿s dynamic habitats, as well as inquiry-based experience in how to explore and understand complex systems in nature. nThis course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 144H: Ocean Life and Ecosystems in Monterey Bay (BIOHOPK 244H)

Monterey Bay is a jewel in North America's National Marine Sanctuary system. It supports a diverse marine ecosystem with open sea pelagic animals such as blue whales and white sharks, a large undersea canyon with deep ocean environments close to shore, kelp forests and wind-swept sandy shores. This region of complex oceanography supports a hot spot of rich marine biodiversity. This class will explore the amazing ecosystems and vertebrate animals of the Monterey Bay thru the lens/interface of animal physiology, biologging and ecology. Lectures will be on local animal athletes and inhabitants including white, salmon and mako sharks, bluefin and albacore tunas, blue whales, orcas, salmon, otters and kelp forest ecology, the remarkable diving physiology of elephant seals and the trans-oceanic flights of albatross. Lecture/seminar and discussion formats will be used.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Block, B. (PI)

BIOHOPK 234H: Topics in Comparative and Environmental Physiology

Seminar and discussion focused on current topics and research at the interface of physiology and ecology
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 1

BIOHOPK 244H: Ocean Life and Ecosystems in Monterey Bay (BIOHOPK 144H)

Monterey Bay is a jewel in North America's National Marine Sanctuary system. It supports a diverse marine ecosystem with open sea pelagic animals such as blue whales and white sharks, a large undersea canyon with deep ocean environments close to shore, kelp forests and wind-swept sandy shores. This region of complex oceanography supports a hot spot of rich marine biodiversity. This class will explore the amazing ecosystems and vertebrate animals of the Monterey Bay thru the lens/interface of animal physiology, biologging and ecology. Lectures will be on local animal athletes and inhabitants including white, salmon and mako sharks, bluefin and albacore tunas, blue whales, orcas, salmon, otters and kelp forest ecology, the remarkable diving physiology of elephant seals and the trans-oceanic flights of albatross. Lecture/seminar and discussion formats will be used.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Block, B. (PI)

BIOHOPK 300H: Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of more »
Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission);
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 350H: Life history variation in the evolution of developmental mechanisms

We study the development of adult body plans by a strong focus on understanding embryonic development. Most animal developmental models are defined by direct development, where the adult body plan forms directly during embryogenesis. However, in many bilaterian phyla, the embryo gives rise to a larval body plan, that is often characterized by a body plan very distinct from the adults that they give rise to. The adult body plan forms postembryonically, often weeks into larval development. Most broad evolutionary body plan comparative studies compare developmental mechanisms of embryos without considering the mode of development of the animals being compared and how this may affect the analysis. In this course we will explore the diversity of developmental strategies in animal phyla and discuss the importance of integrating a more explicit consideration of life history into broad body plan comparisons across distantly related phyla.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1

BIOHOPK 802H: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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