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51 - 60 of 156 results for: ARTSTUDI

ARTSTUDI 163: Drawing with Code (ARTSINST 142)

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 164: Design in Public Places

How does our design of public spaces and elements of our built environment influence and control people's movements and expressions in these spaces? Can re-designing a trashcan or a stairway change how people throw away their trash or use the stairs? What are the principles of democracy, surveillance, or personal expression at stake in our current shared spaces? How have artists and designers used their skills to question or re-direct people's behavior in these public spheres, or in other spheres of shared cultural heritage? Strategies include re-designing components of the built environment, but also other strategies of intervention, tactical media and reality hacking.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 164M: Art of Resistance: Community Building and Self Preservation through Zine Making

This class explores the history, practice, and technique of creating fanzines as a device for protest or community building. Discussions, projects, and readings focus on the history of self-publishing for the preservation of minority and marginalized interests. This course will familiarize students with various techniques for using appropriated and original imagery by way of printmaking, photography, design, and illustration. In addition to engaging with imagery, students will learn effective ways to design using text and typography to support their message. Students will create a small number of zines, each focused on a particular discipline but using the content of their choice. Students will also have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers involved in zine-making and view zine collections from the San Francisco Library and Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art in Las Vegas, Nevada as well as the personal collection of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ramirez, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 165: Social Media and Performative Practices

How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study di more »
How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study different artist¿s approach to media, technically as well as conceptually. Experimentation is highly emphasized throughout this course, as the goal is for the students to create and produce works that uses social media in new ways to tell stories, connect with, mystify or surprise the audience.nnA selection of software such as Photoshop, Premiere Pro, After Affects, and other tools will be introduced in class that will assist the students in producing work for the required assignments.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 165M: Practice, Practice, Practice: Cultivating Creative Rituals and Routines

Focuses on the importance of daily rituals and routines through experiments and exercises in various mediums. We divide time between examining those who create daily using meditation, writing, drawing, performance, photography and more to tackle concepts of identity, time, endurance, memory, the mundane and the miraculous and working towards our own daily practice. Students set the rules for their daily practice. All experience levels welcome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Elkins, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 166: Sculptural Screens / Malleable Media (ARTSTUDI 266)

In this mixed intro and upper level studio course, students will experiment with video and computational outputs embedded in physical scenarios. What new physical formats are made possible by contemporary screen and projection-mapping technologies? How can we make expressive use of LCD screens, pico projectors, i-pad arrays, and LEDs? The class will address the screen as sculptural medium by examining established artists like Nam June Paik, Michael Snow, Tony Oursler, and Pippilotti Rist, as well as exploring emerging contemporary artists tackling this medium. Prerequisites to take the class at the 266 upper level include one of the following: Intro to Digital/Physical Design, Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor. The intro level 166 course can be taken with no prerequisites.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 167: Introduction to Animation

Projects in animation techniques including flipbook, cutout/collage, stop-motion such as claymation, pixilation, and puppet animation, rotoscoping, and time-lapse. Films. Computers used as post-production tools, but course does not cover computer-generated animation. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Miyazaki, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 167M: Animated By Origins: Africa and The Americas

When working with experimental animation, what can we learn from the Shangaan about compositing, layering and collaging, from the Dogon about counter-rhythms and remixing, or from the Lakota about observation and improvisation? In this class, we will gain a deep understanding of and draw connections between experimental creative practices in selected indigenous/vernacular cultures across Africa and the Americas. We will do this in order to reimagine frameworks for approaching, creating and experiencing experimental media art outside Western canons. Assignments will require students to engage either their own origin stories, histories and/or other archives of their choice or interest. This source material can be personal, collective, public, general, formal, informal, real or imagined. We will look at different ways of approaching archival material (photographs, sound, video, writing, memory) for the purposes of connecting disparate elements into brief and cohesive or anti-cohesive animations. This is an introductory experimental animation class, so no prior experience of animation or video/sound editing is needed.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Maelane, L. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 167S: DIY Animation and Video

This course will introduce students to stop-motion animation and video editing techniques for art making, created on cell phones and with freely available software and tools. Students in this class will analyze and create lo-res or "DIY" works designed for fast production and distribution via internet and social media channels.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 168: Data as Material

How can data be used as material in art and design projects? Beyond straight-forward ideas of data-visualization, this studio course investigates how we construct meaning from sets of information, and how the construction of those sets determines the meaning itself. This course also investigates different display aesthetics and how this is also a strategy for generating meaning. Artists studied include those who use various forms of personal, public, and social data as part of their practice. Historical examples from conceptual artists and other genres are considered along with contemporary artists working with data in digital or hybrid digital/physical formats.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ulfeldt, A. (PI)
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