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1 - 10 of 29 results for: LINGUIST

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This introductory-level course is targeted to students with no linguistics background. It is designed to provide an overview of methods, findings, and problems in eight main areas of linguistics: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, Historical Linguistics, and Sociolinguistics. Through lectures, in-class activities, and problem sets, you will come away with an overview of various linguistic phenomena, a sense of the diversity across languages, skills of linguistic analysis, an awareness of connections between these linguistics and applications of linguistics more broadly, and a basis for understanding the systematic, but complex nature of human language. While much of the course uses English to illuminate various points, you will be exposed to and learn to analyze languages other than English. By the end of the course, you should be able to explain similarities and differences of human languages, use basic linguistic terminology appropriately, apply the tools of linguistic analysis to problems and puzzles of linguistics, understand the questions that drive much research in linguistics, and explain how understanding linguistics is relevant for a variety of real-world phenomena.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 35: Minds and Machines (CS 24, PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Students must take this course before being approved to declare Symbolic Systems as a major. All students interested in studying Symbolic Systems are urged to take this course early in their student careers. The course material and presentation will be at an introductory level, without prerequisites. If you have any questions about the course, please email symsys1staff@gmail.com.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 110: Introduction to Phonology

Introduction to the sound systems of the world's languages, their similarities and differences. Theories that account for the tacit generalizations that govern the sound patterns of languages. Prerequisite: Linguist 1 or Linguist 105
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 145: Introduction to Psycholinguistics (LINGUIST 245A, PSYCH 140)

How do people do things with language? How do we go from perceiving the acoustic waves that reach our ears to understanding that someone just announced the winner of the presidential election? How do we go from a thought to spelling that thought out in a sentence? How do babies learn language from scratch? This course is a theoretical introduction to psycholinguistics -- the study of how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. The course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of both the research methodologies used in psycholinguistic research and many of the well-established findings in the field. Topics covered include language acquisition, speech perception, word recognition, sentence processing, sentence production, and discourse and inference.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

LINGUIST 160: Historical Linguistics

Principles of historical linguistics:, the nature of language change. Kinds and causes of change, variation and diffusion of changes through populations, differentiation of dialects and languages, determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, the reconstruction of ancestral languages and intermediate changes, parallels with cultural and genetic evolutionary theory, and implications of variation and change for the description and explanation of language in general. Prerequisite: introductory course in linguistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 196: Introduction to Research for Undergraduates

Introduction to linguistic research via presentations by Stanford linguistics faculty and graduate students. Open to undergraduate students interested in linguistics. Required for linguistics majors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Lu, J. (PI)

LINGUIST 198: Honors Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

LINGUIST 199: Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

LINGUIST 225S: Syntax and Morphology Research Seminar

Presentation of ongoing research in syntax and morphology. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)
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