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GERMAN 120B: Fairy Tales

In this course, we will explore the fairy tale genre both from a systematic and historical perspective. We will start by asking how fairy tales differ from other short prose texts like legends and fables. We will then focus on bigger themes allowing us to discern differences within this literary form, namely: the fantastic and the real, motif constancy and variation, narration and orality, animality and the human. Over the course of the seminar, we will not only delve into the world-famous folk tale collection of the Grimm brothers, but also the more stylized Romantic `Kunstmärchen¿ tradition (Goethe, Brentano, Hoffmann). Examples from the later 19th-century (Keller, Storm) and the 20th century (Hofmannsthal, Kafka, Döblin, Bachmann) demonstrate attempts to reformulate the fairy tale tradition by transgressing its boundaries. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

HISTORY 201D: History Goes Pop! Songwriting the Past (HISTORY 301D)

Historical research doesn't always take the form of a thesis, an article, or a book. Sometimes, research leads to film, museum exhibits, works of art, or... music. In this class, students will collaborate to write, record, and produce original pop music (perhaps even an entire album) based on original research in Stanford's wealth of archives and Special Collections. Background in music is NOT required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of poetry (meter, rhythm, lineation, rhetorical figures and tropes) and the exploration of lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poem). Students write original poems throughout the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (FRENCH 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ITALIC 92: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Interpreting

ITALIC 92, Interpreting. Why do artworks affect us and how do we make sense of them? What makes it difficult to describe works of art and how can we do this well? How do our individual experiences influence our responses and interpretations? ITALIC will address these questions in lecture and see art on and off campus, including performances of Gloria the new play by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and the ballet Rite of Spring choreographed by Yang Liping.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Challenging

ITALIC 93, Challenging. Challenging is the third part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. How does an artwork influence or challenge the society in which (and outside of which) it is situated? How does the structure of a society determine and challenge the qualities of its art? How do artworks challenge their medium and material? Where does an artwork end? Where is the border between life and art? The quarter, and the year, culminates in a three-day field trip to Los Angeles where we will attend a performance of the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall, and visit art and artists around the city.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ITALIC 100: ITALIC Seminar: Notes to a Young Artist

Working with the Haas Center, students in this seminar will create a mini-magazine/online course about art to share with students at a Bay Area high school. You will assemble a list of suggested readings and brief essays on key artistic texts and concepts, as well as images and links to the artistic examples you find most inspiring. You will create a variety of media about these ideas and artists, from illustrated slideshows to video essays or podcasts to short explanatory texts and longer personal essays. The guiding question of the course is: What does a young artist need to know?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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