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371 - 380 of 442 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 345A: Race and Power: The Making of Human Difference in History, Biology and Capital

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the reality of race as a literally constructed phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, penal, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race in systems of capital accumulation.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 346: The Social Imagination

The imagination as such has not been an accustomed object of ethnographic fieldwork or theoretical debate in anthropology. This seminar consists of a cluster of thematic explorations including: the spatial imagination of states; the imagination of race, colonialism, and domination; the social imagination of evil and of the good; and conceptualizations of the creative imagination.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

ANTHRO 346A: Sexuality Studies in Anthropology

Current research on sexuality from perspectives including paleoanthropology, archaeology, ethnography, and linguistic anthropology. Readings paired with case studies that explore theoretical and methodological issues. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2011

ANTHRO 347: Religion and Modernity (RELIGST 332X)

What role has the category of religion played in the development of the modern state, both colonial and national? How have central concepts of liberal political thought, such as freedom, progress, and history, depended on certain normative ideas of religion? Through various genealogical, historical, and ethnographic inquires, this course examines how the category of religion has both subtended and disturbed formations of colonial and post-colonial modernity.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ANTHRO 348: Representing Medicine

The seminar will offer the opportunity to discuss the recent work of a series of 9 scholars known for their innovation in writing and research. The seminar will offer professional networking as well as the opportunity to engage authors in questions of writing, approaches to fieldwork, strategies for career advancement, and brainstorming on how to structure relevant arguments. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 348A: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 348B: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, HISTORY 349)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 349: Anthropology of Capitalism

This advanced graduate seminar explores capitalism as an historically-situated and culturally-mediated articulation of practices rather than as an economic system or social structure governed by an internal logic. It draws on poststructural theories of culture, society and subjectivity to investigate the processes through which diverse capitalist practices are produced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Previous graduate level coursework in cultural anthropology, social theory or cultural studies is required. No auditing is permitted. Enrollment limited to 12.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 349A: Advanced Archaeological Field Methods: A Practical Approach to Working With and Within Communities

This is a graduate level course (open to undergraduates with permission) in archaeological field methods at several archaeological and cultural sites in the San Francisco Bay area. This is a practical course designed to help students identify potential archaeological sites (using GIS) historical maps, historical archives and extant site reports. Students will gain hands-on experience with mapping, field survey and strategies and methods of field excavation. Study of local artifact types and lab techniques for artifact cleaning and identification and written analysis. The course emphasizes a community based model of archaeology, working with members of local indigenous cultures. The seminar will begin with readings and classroom instruction and proceed to the field. Students will be required to hike to field sites and conduct experiments using a variety of equipment, recording devices and strategies. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ANTHRO 350A: Writing as Intervention: Science, Medicine, and Ethics in Today's World

In this course we will explore contemporary issues of culture and power rooted in science, medicine, technology and futurist proposals to better the human condition with technological fixes. We will investigate anthropological and ethnographic-based theories and methods to propose alternative ethical solutions. These readings will be rooted in examining global stratification, economic metrics of progress, and the routinization of human degradation ranging from norms around sexual power, labor exploits, privacy infringements, data sharing, and automation.nnThe course will be structured as a writing workshop with frequent, short writing assignments to be shared with others in the course. The workshop format will facilitate the course goal of each student producing at least one publishable op-ed, article or other product of intervention at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
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