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81 - 90 of 260 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 129B: Black Geographies: An Orientation

This introductory course examines racialization and antiblackness as spatial practices as well as the placemaking practices and sensibilities across and within Black communities throughout the Americas. Rather than focusing merely on where Black people live, this course explores the socio-political production of space and the ways Black subjectivity and Black social life imperatively produce a sense of place that often complicate traditional geographic rules. Putting into conversation key texts at the intersection of Anthropology, Human Geography, and Black Studies, we consider how space and place are bound up with contestations over citizenship, autonomy, environmental justice, and state violence¿¿in addition to the alternative spatial imaginations produced therein¿¿ in rural and urban geographies across the Americas.

ANTHRO 129C: A Deep Dive Into the Indian Ocean: From Prehistory to the Modern Day (ANTHRO 229C, ARCHLGY 129C)

The Indian Ocean has formed an enduring connection between three continents, countless small islands and a multitude of cultural and ethnic groups and has become the focus of increasing interest in this geographically vast and culturally diverse region. This course explores a range of topics and issues, from the nature and dynamics of colonization and cultural development as a way of understanding the human experience in this part of the world, to topics such as religion, disease, and heritage The course guides studies in the many ways in which research in the Indian Ocean has a direct impact on our ability to compare developments in the Atlantic and Pacific. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 130D: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 132: Religion and Politics in the Muslim World

This course provides an ethnographic examination of religion and politics in the Muslim world. What is the role of Islam in the political life of modern Muslim societies? Conversely, how do modern political powers shape and constrain the terms of religious life? This course takes an anthropological perspective on the study of Islam: our investigations will not focus on the origins of scriptures and doctrines but rather on the use of religious texts and signs in social context and on the political significance of ritual and bodily practices. A major aim of the course is provide students with analytical resources for thinking critically about the history and politics of modern Muslim societies, with a particular focus on issues of religious authority, gender and sexuality, and the politics of secularism.
Last offered: Spring 2022 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 132A: Power and Counter-Power: Anti-Elite Politics in Contemporary Times

We live in politically turbulent times, and so much of the confounding social and political movements of our times seem to position themselves against ¿the elite¿: feminist movements against patriarchal states, autonomists against neoliberal capitalism and the police, White nationalists, nativists and populist strongmen against `liberals¿, etc. These expressions of social and political discontent stand oddly at their political opposites [Left v. Right], share common grievances around the lack of structural responses by the states and the international community towards climate change, neoliberalism, racism and the like. They also all use decentralized, global networks and mediascapes to make themselves present. This course looks at social formations that emerge at the absence, or in opposition to, state and elite control. We will begin by delving into the anthropological record to understand how people throughout history have developed forms of counter-power that delegitimized or put t more »
We live in politically turbulent times, and so much of the confounding social and political movements of our times seem to position themselves against ¿the elite¿: feminist movements against patriarchal states, autonomists against neoliberal capitalism and the police, White nationalists, nativists and populist strongmen against `liberals¿, etc. These expressions of social and political discontent stand oddly at their political opposites [Left v. Right], share common grievances around the lack of structural responses by the states and the international community towards climate change, neoliberalism, racism and the like. They also all use decentralized, global networks and mediascapes to make themselves present. This course looks at social formations that emerge at the absence, or in opposition to, state and elite control. We will begin by delving into the anthropological record to understand how people throughout history have developed forms of counter-power that delegitimized or put the elites in check. Then, we will look into contemporary ethnographic studies of social and political mobilization that might adopt such strategies of counter-power for different and often contradictory and antagonistic goals. Case-studies will be drawn from Europe, Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East.

ANTHRO 132C: Technology and Inequality (CSRE 132C)

In this advanced interdisciplinary seminar we will examine the ways that technologies aimed to make human lives better (healthier, freer, more connected, and informed) often also harbor the potential to exacerbate social inequalities. Drawing from readings in the social sciences on power and ethics, we will pay special attention to issues of wealth, race, ethnicity, sex, gender, globalization and humanitarianism.
Last offered: Autumn 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 132D: Thinking Technology: Anthropological Perspectives

What role does technology play in society, and vice-versa? This course considers the question from an anthropological perspective, pairing different conceptual models of social-technical relations (Social Constructivism, Actor-Network Theory, Cyborg Anthropology) with real world examples. Through such technologies as factory machines, trains, Bakelite, slot machines, computers, missiles, and PET scanners, students will gain insights both on how the social suffuses the mundane objects around us, and how technologies have radically redefined how we see the world.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ANTHRO 133: Masculinity: Technologies and Cultures of Gender (ANTHRO 233, FEMGEN 133M)

What is masculinity? How are masculinities invested with power and meaning in cultural contexts? How is anthropological attention to them informed by and extending inquiry across the academy in spheres such as culture studies, political theory, gender studies, history, and science and technology studies? Limited enrollment.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 134: Language, Gender and Sexuality (ANTHRO 234)

This course explores how identities of gender and sexuality are linked to particular ways of speaking and using language, and how language itself becomes the site of the politics of gender and sexuality. Enrolled students should have completed prior coursework in Anthropology, Linguistics, or Feminist Studies. Prerequisite: by instructor consent.
Last offered: Autumn 2021

ANTHRO 134C: Movements and Migrations: Understanding the Movements of People (ARCHLGY 163, ASNAMST 163)

Mass movements of people across the world is not a new phenomenon. And yet, in the contemporary moment, the pace of migration from global business networks to displacements from violence and climate change as well as the interconnectivity of social networks is unprecedented. In this discussion seminar class, we will focus on the movements and migrations of people in North America. Though we will focus on the contemporary era, we start with examining the multiple ways that anthropologists understand, document, and make sense of the ways in which people have moved throughout history from bioanthropological, linguistic, archaeological, and ethnographic methodologies. We will further unpack some of the key theoretical discourses around the movement of people, and the frames of analysis that are commonly applied. By considering this topic through multiple lenses we will begin to appreciate the complexities of studying the movement of people and the relevance that these questions have to the present day. In addition to understanding the myriad of debates and case studies around movement and migration, students will develop their own research projects, learning essential skills in executing ethnographic approaches and applying the knowledge we survey throughout the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
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