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ILAC 107N: 3D Modeling, Virtual Media, and the Poetics of the Self: The Art and Lives of Fernando Pessoa

Preference to freshmen. The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa, Portugal'€™s greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work (in Portuguese and English) as for his complex understanding of selfhood (he would divide his own subjectivity into 106 different, autonomous selves), Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa'€™s work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, art, and the self. Class field trip to San Francisco. Written assignments include a journal, blog posts, and a final paper written as someone else. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 108N: Masterpieces: García Márquez

Extensive and detailed reading of the major works and a selection of the most significant critical texts about the author. Secondary readings by Vargas Llosa, Ludmer, Moretti, and Bloom. Topics include: macondismo, magical realism, canonicity, representations of violence, and autobiography.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 111Q: Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 239: Borges and Translation (DLCL 239)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poetry) and formal elements of poetry (e.g. meter, rhythm, rhetorical figures, and tropes). Students write original poems over the course of the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Authors include Dari­o, Machado, Jimenez, Vallejo, Huidobro, Salinas, Pales Matos, Lorca, Aleixandre, Cernuda, Neruda, Girondo. Course is offered every other year. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course taught in Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10 students.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

ITALIC is an arts-minded, residence-based academic program for freshmen. It's built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art. It also builds community. This yearlong experience fosters close exchanges among faculty, students, guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We¿ll trace the challenges that works of art have presented to history, politics, and culture, particularly since the 19th century. We'll look at ways arts can inform creative problem-solving, confront uncertainty and ambiguity, and experiment with different sets of rules. Through rigorous inquiry, ITALIC seeks to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

JEWISHST 147B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (COMPLIT 127B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ME 13AX: Form & Space

In this course students will explore the inherent order in 3-dimensional space that underlies and determines nature of form and structure, and then use that knowledge to inform the design and fabrication of original artworks. A survey of relevant artists and architects will suggest the rich potential for creative expression that results from a deep understanding of the nature of space. Topics will include: symmetry, pattern, tessellation, duality, transformation, polyhedra, space-filling.

The course will be conducted in Room 36, a state-of-the art maker space. Students will learn how to use a professional CAD program and a computer-controlled laser cutter to create models out of paper, plastic, and wood. Students will have access to 3D printers, and other digital and analog fabrication tools.

Students considering taking this course need not have any background in the visual arts, but should have a firm foundation and avid interest in geometry. Access to a Mac or Windows Laptops is required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Edmark, J. (PI)
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