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91 - 100 of 215 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 250A: Prints, Propaganda, Protest

From books to newspapers to posters, printed materials have generated and circulated political and social messages for centuries. This seminar takes a transhistorical and transnational approach to the history of print to explore its role in shaping public consciousness and producing social change from the fifteenth century to today. Attending to both medium and message, this course will address the graphic works of artists such as Honoré Daumier, Corita Kent, and Emory Douglas and cover topics such as religion, war, empire, disease, and civil rights. The seminar will incorporate visits to the Cantor Arts Center, pending the reopening of collections.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ARTHIST 251: Warhol's World (ARTHIST 451)

Andy Warhol's art has never before been more widely exhibited, published, or licensed for commercial use, product design, and publication than it is today. For all Warhol's promiscuous visibility and global cachet at the current moment, there is much we have yet to learn about his work and the conditions of its making. This course considers the wide world of Warhol's art and life, including his commercial work of the 1950s, Pop art and films of the 1960s, and celebrity portraiture of the 1970s and 80s. Of particular interest throughout will be Warhol's photography as it reflects his interest in wealth and celebrity on the one hand and on the everyday life of everyday people on the other.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 252A: Art and Power: From Royal Spectacle to Revolutionary Ritual (FRENCH 252)

From the Palace of Versailles to grand operas to Jacques-Louis David's portraits of revolutionary martyrs, rarely have the arts been so powerfully mobilized by the State as in early modern France. This course examines how the arts were used from Louis XIV to the Revolution in order to broadcast political authority across Europe. We will also consider the resistance to such attempts to elicit shock-and-awe through artistic patronage. By studying music, architecture, garden design, the visual arts, and theater together, students will gain a new perspective on works of art in their political contexts. But we will also examine the libelous pamphlets and satirical cartoons that turned the monarchy¿s grandeur against itself, ending the course with an examination of the new artistic regime of the French Revolution. The course will be taught in English with the option of French readings for departmental majors.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARTHIST 253: Aesthetics and Phenomenology (ARTHIST 453, FILMEDIA 253, FILMEDIA 453)

This course explores central topics in aesthetics where aesthetics is understood both in the narrow sense of the philosophy of art and aesthetic judgment, and in a broader sense as it relates to questions of perception, sensation, and various modes of embodied experience. We will engage with both classical and contemporary works in aesthetic theory, while special emphasis will be placed on phenomenological approaches to art and aesthetic experience across a range of media and/or mediums (including painting, sculpture, film, and digital media). PhD students in the Art History program may take the class to fulfill degree requirements in Modern/Contemporary Art or Film & Media Studies, depending on the topic of their seminar paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Denson, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 256: What Was Photography? (ARTHIST 456)

Digital imaging has largely replaced darkroom work over the past quarter century, yet analog practices still dominate theories of photography. Working closely with the Capital Group Foundation Collection at the Cantor, this class will explore how those theories relate to vintage photographic prints and whether they are still relevant to the photography being produced today. Students will select one photographer within the Collection and create a set of writings that help contemporary viewers see these mid-century American artists through diverse contemporary perspectives.

ARTHIST 260A: Histories of the Museum: Collecting, Preserving, and Exhibiting Art

Museums have a history. This course questions how museums have shaped and been shaped by society, from their origins in early modern cabinets of curiosity to their contemporary transformation into virtual galleries and online exhibitions. Incorporating visits to Stanford's diverse collections, this seminar considers the histories of museums as public institutions and explores key concepts guiding the acquisition and display of art.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ARTHIST 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, FILMEDIA 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 265A: Word and Image (ARTHIST 465A, COMPLIT 225, ITALIAN 265, ITALIAN 365)

What impact do images have on our reading of a text? How do words influence our understanding of images or our reading of pictures? What makes a visual interpretation of written words or a verbal rendering of an image successful? These questions will guide our investigation of the manifold connections between words and images in this course on intermediality and the relations and interrelations between writing and art from classical antiquity to the present. Readings and discussions will include such topics as the life and afterlife in word and image of Ovid's "Metamorphoses," Dante's "Divine Comedy," Ludovico Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso," and John Milton's "Paradise Lost;" the writings and creative production of poet-artists Michelangelo Buonarroti, William Blake, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti; innovations in and correspondences between literature and art in the modern period, from symbolism in the nineteenth century through the flourishing of European avant-garde movements in the twentieth century.
Last offered: Autumn 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 268: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 468)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 272: Feminist Avant-Garde Art in Germany and Beyond (1968-2019) (ARTHIST 472, FEMGEN 280, GERMAN 280)

In "Woman's Art: A Manifesto" (1972), the artist, performer and filmmaker Valie Export (*1940) proposed the transfer of women's experience into an art context and considered the body "a signal bearer of meaning and communication." In reconceptualizing and displaying "the" body (her body) as an aesthetic sign, Export's groundbreaking work paves the way towards questioning the concepts of a "female aesthetic" and a "male gaze" (L. Mulvey). Beginning with Export, we will discuss art informed by and coalescing with feminism(s): the recent revival of the 1970s in all-women group shows, the dialectic of feminist revolution, the breakdown of stable identities and their representations, point(s) of absorption of commodified femininities. Particular attention will be paid to German-language theory and its medial transfer into art works. For students of German Studies, readings and discussions in German are possible. Online discussions will be organized with contemporary artists and curators. Em more »
In "Woman's Art: A Manifesto" (1972), the artist, performer and filmmaker Valie Export (*1940) proposed the transfer of women's experience into an art context and considered the body "a signal bearer of meaning and communication." In reconceptualizing and displaying "the" body (her body) as an aesthetic sign, Export's groundbreaking work paves the way towards questioning the concepts of a "female aesthetic" and a "male gaze" (L. Mulvey). Beginning with Export, we will discuss art informed by and coalescing with feminism(s): the recent revival of the 1970s in all-women group shows, the dialectic of feminist revolution, the breakdown of stable identities and their representations, point(s) of absorption of commodified femininities. Particular attention will be paid to German-language theory and its medial transfer into art works. For students of German Studies, readings and discussions in German are possible. Online discussions will be organized with contemporary artists and curators. Emphasis will be on: the relationship between (female?) aesthetics and (gender) politics, between private and public spheres, between housework and artwork; conceptions of identity (crises) and corporeality in visual culture and mass media; categories of the artist´s self in relation to the use of media (video, photography, film, collage, installation art). This course will be taught by Professor Elena Zanichelli, a Berlin-based art historian, critic, and curator. She is junior professor for Art History and Aesthetic Theory at IKFK (Institute for Art History - Film History - Art Education) at the University of Bremen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
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