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261 - 270 of 335 results for: CSI::certificate

OB 348: Leading and Managing Health Care Organizations: Innovation and Collaboration in High Stakes Settings

Leading and managing in complex, high stakes settings, like health care, where lives and livelihoods are on the line, presents distinctive challenges and constraints. This course challenges you to apply seminal and contemporary theories in organizational behavior to evaluate managerial decisions and develop evidence-based strategies for leading and managing health care teams and organizations. Topics include leading systems that promote learning; implementing change; and interdisciplinary problem-solving, decision-making, and collaboration. Group work and exercises will simulate high pressure and risk-taking under uncertainty. While the focus of this course will be on health care situations, lessons are relevant to other settings including consulting, banking, and high tech, and prior experience in the health sector is not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

OBGYN 216: Current Issues in Reproductive Health

Reproductive Health is a broad subject encompassing many concepts and practices. Issues and services within the context of reproductive health include such diverse topics as fertility, pregnancy, contraception, abortion, sexuality, menopause and parenting. Course focuses on topics related to abortion services, fertility and contraception; current research and practices in family planning; legislation and issues of access.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability is a two-quarter project-based course hosted by Stanford's d.school and jointly offered by the Graduate School of Business and the School of Mechanical Engineering. We focus on the development of products and services to improve the lives of the our poorest citizens. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change lives. Topics include user empathy, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social entrepreneurship, business modeling, ethics, equity, partnerships, team dynamics and project management. Since the course was first offered, we have executed 168 projects with 72 partners. Many of the projects have been implemented and are achieving significant social impact. This year we will launch for the first time, Extreme Local, where we will team up with local Bay Area partners to address some of their challenges, We will continue to publish latest information for prospective students here: https://extreme.stanford.edu/prospective-students
Terms: Win | Units: 4

OIT 334: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability is a two-quarter project-based course hosted by Stanford's d.school and jointly offered by the Graduate School of Business and the School of Mechanical Engineering. We focus on the development of products and services to improve the lives of the our poorest citizens. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change lives. Topics include user empathy, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social entrepreneurship, business modeling, ethics, equity, partnerships, team dynamics and project management. Since the course was first offered, we have executed 168 projects with 72 partners. Many of the projects have been implemented and are achieving significant social impact. This year we will launch for the first time, Extreme Local, where we will team up with local Bay Area partners to address some of their challenges, We will continue to publish latest information for prospective students here: https://extreme.stanford.edu/prospective-students
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

OIT 384: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2021), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2021), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coa more »
In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2021), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2021), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

OIT 385: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2021), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2021), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coa more »
In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2021), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2021), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

Race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are just a few of the social determinants that contribute to health disparities. Apply a racial equity lens to drive a deeper understanding of how vulnerable populations are uniquely at risk for poorer health outcomes. Explore how where we live, work, learn, and play influences health status, and examine the processes through which social and environmental determinants adversely affect health and drive inequities across the lifespan. With experts from multiple sectors, this course will discuss innovative clinical, public health, policy, advocacy, and community engaged solutions to advance health equity. Explore the unique role of health professionals in addressing health inequities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. Med/Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

PEDS 222: Beyond Health Care: the effects of social policies on health (HUMBIO 122)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122. Med/Graduate students must enroll in PEDS 222.) Available evidence at the national and cross-country level linking social welfare interventions and health outcomes. If and how non-health programs and policies could have an impact on positive health outcomes. Evaluation of social programs and policies that buffer the negative health impact of economic instability and unemployment among adult workers and their children. Examination of safety nets, including public health insurance, income maintenance programs, and disability insurance. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisites: HUMBIO 3B or equivalent, and some background in research methods and statistics, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health

Open to medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. Examines the newly emerging field of human rights and global health, beginning with the essential background into the field of human rights, and the recent emergence of health as a human right. Emphasis is on the pioneering work of Dr. Paul Farmer and Partners in Health and the challenge he and his organization have posed to the conventional wisdom about approaches to combating poor health and disease worldwide. Topics include the "big three" infectious diseases -- tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS -- as well as emerging infectious diseases, clean water and sanitation, and malnutrition and famine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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