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131 - 140 of 635 results for: all courses

CLASSICS 40: Greek Philosophy (PHIL 100)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory. No prereqs, not repeatable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 41: Herodotus

For Ancient History field of study majors; others by consent of instructor. Close reading technique. Historical background to the Greco-Persian Wars; ancient views of empire, culture, and geography; the wars and their aftermath; ancient ethnography and historiography, including the first narrative of ancient Egypt.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

CLASSICS 42: Philosophy and Literature (COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 43: Exploring the New Testament (JEWISHST 86, RELIGST 86)

To explore the historical context of the earliest Christians, students will read most of the New Testament as well as many documents that didn't make the final cut. Non-Christian texts, Roman art, and surviving archeological remains will better situate Christianity within the ancient world. Students will read from the Dead Sea Scrolls, explore Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing divine temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse an ancient marriage guide, and engage with recent scholarship in archeology, literary criticism, and history.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 52: Introduction to Roman Archaeology (ARCHLGY 81)

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

CLASSICS 54: Introduction to World Architecture (ARTHIST 3)

This course offers an expansive introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the mid-20th century. The examples range from the Americas to Europe and the Middle East and Asia. The business of architecture, its structure and materials, are addressed in each case, because designs have to leave the paper to achieve a presence in the world, and an overriding concern is to understand architecture as a sensible manifestation of particular cultures, whether societies or individuals. To the same ends, student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local space, whether a room or a building, and then the built environment at large.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

CLASSICS 56: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (ARTHIST 1A)

This course explores monuments from the pre-historic through the medieval periods with a focus on their sensory dimensions. How did the ritual and the décor manipulate the viewer and produced different states of consciousness in the cave art of Lascaux? How was power structured as a sensual experience in the empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Egypt? How did the concept of democracy realize itself in the development of pictorial and sculptural naturalism in Classical Athens? We will engage some of the greatest monuments of human civilization produced in the most distant past in places far away and bring them nearby engaging also with the art at the Cantor Museum and the facsimiles of manuscripts at the Stanford Libraries. The lectures introduce major monuments, while the discussion sections allow students to gain new powers of observation and deepen their analytical skills through a direct engagement with objects on display at the museum.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CLASSICS 76: Global History: The Ancient World (HISTORY 1A)

This course examines the emergence of "world empires"-- the first way of constituting a world-- in four regions of the eastern hemisphere from the first millennium BCE to the year 900 CE. It will study the pivotal role of cities, the importance of rulers, the incorporation of diverse peoples, and how the states that followed their collapse constituted new world orders through combining imitation of the vanished empire with the elaboration of the new "world religions."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 83: The Greeks (HISTORY 101)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
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