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11 - 20 of 289 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOE 376: Startup Garage: Design

A hands-on, project-based course, in which teams identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. This course integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOE 377: Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

STRAMGT 356/ BIOE 376 teams that concluded at the end of fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, may continue with STRAMGT 366/ BIOE 377 in winter quarter. Teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model, perform a series of experiments to test key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOHOPK 290H: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical supervised teaching experience in a biology or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation of course materials. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 323H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major. 2020-21 academic year offering of this course is dependent on COVID-19 regulations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16

BIOS 200: Foundations in Experimental Biology

This course is divided into two 3-week cycles. During the first cycle, students will be developing a 2-page original research proposal, which may be used for NSF or other fellowship applications. In the second cycle, students will work in small teams and will be mentored by faculty to develop an original research project for oral presentation. Skills emphasized include: 1) reading for breadth and depth; 2) developing compelling, creative arguments; 3) communicating with the spoken and written word; 4) working in teams. Important features of the course include peer assessment, interactive joint classes, and substantial face-to-face discussion with faculty drawn from across the Biosciences programs. Shortened autumn quarter class; class meets during weeks 1 through 8 of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

BIOS 225: Diversity and Inclusion in Science

Introduction to the social science literature on factors contributing to gender disparities in the scientific workplace (e.g. implicit bias and stereotype threat). Discussions focus on steps that individuals and institutions can take to promote the advancement of women and other underrepresented groups in science, and thus promote the advancement of science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Goodman, M. (PI)

BIOS 242: Writing Compelling Fellowships and Career Development Awards

An overview of principles and fundamentals for writing competitive fellowships (e.g. NIH F31, F32) and career development awards (e.g. NIH K Awards). Topics include: developing specific aims and career development plans; using the review criteria to inform writing; timelines and resources. Participants develop proposals through guided exercises with an emphasis on in-class peer review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Botham, C. (PI)

BIOS 263: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Fellowships

Graduate students in the Biosciences PhD Programs develop a fellowship proposal (e.g. NIH F31) focusing on required documents: 1-page specific aims as well as research and career development plans. Students establish a writing practice and learn fundamental grant writing skills through guided exercises, including in-class review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 20 units total)
Instructors: Botham, C. (PI)

BIOS 281: Career Explorations Opportunities: Transitioning to your Career Choice

The Career Exploration Opportunities (CEO) program highlights the skills necessary to make significant contributions to scientific research, business, policy, communication, and more. This course offers tools and exercises to help late-stage trainees clarify academic and professional priorities. Trainees will be empowered to take charge of their chosen career of choice options through hands-on experiences, which fit their skills, interests, and values.Throughout this course, trainees will receive ongoing support from mentors and employers in their desired field as they develop a job search plan, create tailored resumes/cvs, and cover letters, become more confident in their networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills, and choose the experiential learning options necessary to transition to the next phase of their professional development.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1

BIOS 282: Clarifying Career Choices: Your Self-Reflective Research Project

Using the ADAPT Integrated Development Model, this course will focus on the areas of Development and Awareness. It is designed for students who aspire to gain clarity and insights about themselves their career choices and options. It is designed to encourage self-knowledge and increased awareness of roles and job opportunities inside and outside of academia, where an in-depth Science background is desired. The course requires students to complete up to 3 assessments, short writing assignments, and participate in small group discussions. All students will have the opportunity to have a 1:1 follow-up session with the Instructor to discuss the insights gained from the course as well as opportunities to network with alumni and future employers from various fields.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
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