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91 - 100 of 340 results for: all courses

CSRE 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER

CSRE 180A: Foundations of Social Research (SOC 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

CSRE 180B: Introduction to Data Analysis (SOC 180B, SOC 280B)

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

CSRE 196C: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 260: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, URBANST 169)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 21: Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years (ANTHRO 18, ARCHLGY 12)

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

EARTHSYS 114: Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease (EARTHSYS 214, ESS 213, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 137: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (URBANST 132)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. Email lalitvak@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Repeatable 10 times (up to 40 units total)
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

ECON 1: Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ECON 1V: Principles of Economics

The course covers all of economics at a basic level. It stresses the key idea that economics is about making purposeful choice with limited resources and about people interacting with other people as they make these choices. Most of those interactions occur in markets, and the course is mainly about markets, including labor markets and capital markets. We show why free competitive markets can improve people's lives and how they have removed millions from people from poverty, with many more, we hope, to come; we show how monopolies and environmental spillovers cause market failures; we show how to remedy these failures through government policy; and we explain why government failure can also be a problem. The overall goal is to use economics to understand the big issues of the day including economic growth, inequality, crises, and unemployment. The goal of this course is to learn how to use economic analysis to reach reasoned conclusions about the big issues of the day from the workings and benefits of a market economy to the causes of economic growth, financial crises, and unemployment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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