2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

231 - 240 of 582 results for: all courses

FRENCH 228E: Getting Through Proust

Selections from all seven volumes of "In Search of Lost Time". Focus on issues of personal identity (perspective, memory, life-narrative); interpersonal relations (friendship, love, homosexuality, jealousy, indirect expression); knowledge (objective truth, subjective truth, necessary illusions); redemption (enchantment, disenchantment, re-enchantment); aesthetics (music, painting, fiction); and Proust's own style (narrative sequence, sentence structure, irony, metaphor, metonymy, metalepsis). Taught in English; readings in French or English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Landy, J. (PI)

GERMAN 131: What is German Literature?

How have migration and minority discourses changed the German literary and cultural tradition? What is German literature today, and how does it differ from the traditional notion of Germany as the land of "Dichter und Denker?" We will read texts by Goethe, Novalis, Annette von Droste-Hülshoff, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Anna Seghers, Brecht, Christa Wolf, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, and Sasha Marianna Salzmann, and discuss such topics as identity formation, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, class, and ecocriticism. Taught in German. GERLANG 3 or equivalent required.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

GERMAN 134: Freud's Vienna

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of Vienna between 1890 and 1918. The last decades of the Habsburg Empire are often considered a "Golden Age" for bourgeois Viennese Jews, albeit one with its end already visible on the horizon. Students in the course will explore the city through the eyes of several of Vienna's most prominent writers, including Sigmund Freud and Arthur Schnitzler, and seek their own answers to the questions of the era: Was this a Golden Age at all, and if so, for whom?
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

GERMAN 283A: Modern Notions of 'The Holy' (COMPLIT 283A, COMPLIT 383A, GERMAN 383A, RELIGST 283A, RELIGST 383A)

This course explores the question, "What may we call 'holy' in the modern era?" by focusing on key writers and thinkers, who in various ways, and in different times raised this question: Friedrich Hölderlin, Hermann Cohen, Franz Kafka, Martin Heidegger, Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Else Lasker-Schüler, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Hannah Arendt, Margarete Susman, Nelly Sachs, Paul Celan, and Judith Butler.nnThis course will be synchronous-conducted, but will also use an innovative, Stanford-developed, on-line platform called Poetic Thinking. Poetic Thinking allows students to share both their scholarly and creative work with each other. Based on the newest technology and beautifully designed, it will greatly enhance their course experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, hierarchy, and large-scale belief systems.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

(Course is offered for 3 OR 5 units.) Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 1C: Global History: Modern Times

History 1C explores the making of our modern world. It investigates the interconnectednhistories of revolution, war, imperialism, migration, race, slavery, democracy, rebellion, nnationalism, feminism, socialism, fascism, genocide, anti-colonialism, neoliberalism, and npopulist authoritarianism. Analyzing memoirs, novels, films, and other sources, we will ninvestigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies nacross the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 33A: Blood and Roses: The Age of the Tudors

(Same as HISTORY 133A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 133A.) English society and state from the Wars of the Roses to the death of Elizabeth. Political, social, and cultural upheavals of the Tudor period and the changes wrought by the Reformation. The establishment of the Tudor monarchy; destruction of the Catholic church; rise of Puritanism; and 16th-century social and economic changes.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints