2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

191 - 200 of 272 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 385: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 185)

From the late Ming period (ca. 1600) to early 20th century Chinese arts. Topics include: urban arts and print culture; commodification of art; painting theories; self portrayals; art sponsorship, collecting, and ideological programs at the Qing imperial court; media and modernity in Shanghai; art and politics in early 20th century China.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ARTHIST 386: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, JAPAN 186, JAPAN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 387: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, JAPAN 185, JAPAN 285)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ARTHIST 388A: The History of Modern and Contemporary Japanese and Chinese Architecture and Urbanism (ARTHIST 188A)

The recent rapid urbanization and architectural transformation of Asia; focus is on the architecture of Japan and China since the mid-19th century. History of forms, theories, and styles that serve as the foundation for today's buildings and cityscapes. How Eastern and Western ideas of modernism have merged or diverged and how these forces continue to shape the future of Japanese and Chinese architecture and urban form.
Last offered: Spring 2011

ARTHIST 388B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art (ARTHIST 188B)

Chinese artistic engagements with international arenas and with the cultural politics of modernity, from the late 19th century to the present. Topics will include Shanghai modernity and public media; artistic reform and political activism at the end of empire; competition between national style painting and international modernisms; politicized arts of resistance and revolution; post-Mao era experimental and avant-garde movements; transnational careers and exhibition circuits.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ARTHIST 389C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 189C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 400M: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (ARTHIST 200M)

An exploration of the low status of artists in a culture that valued their work but not the men themselves. Potters were especially scorned but even sculptors of gold and ivory statues were seen as "mechanics" (Herodotus), with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon), "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch). Topics include case studies of individual artists, their importance to the polis, their workshops, wages and occupational hazards and the impact of social isolation on the quality of their work.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 401: World War Two: Place, Loss, History (COMPLIT 343, GERMAN 343)

A consideration of how the Second World War still goes on today in the form of haunted absences and vivid representations. Studying literature and art in detail, the seminar will center on some of the places where those absences and representations gather: Portbou, Pearl Harbor, Auschwitz, Guadalcanal, London, Berlin, Hamburg, Rome, Omaha Beach, Peleliu, Monte Cassino, Hollywood. Writers and artists include: James Jones, Georges Didi-Huberman, Walter Benjamin, Eduardo Cadava, W.G. Sebald, Rachel Whiteread, Ingeborg Bachman, Wis¿awa Szymborska, Eugene Sledge, Hans Erich Nossack, Jorie Graham, Gerhard Richter, Dani Karavan, Tom Lea, W. Eugene Smith, Val Lewton, and Terrence Malick.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ARTHIST 402: Inherent Vice (ARTHIST 202)

Taught jointly by an art historian and a senior conservator, this research seminar focuses on selected objects (mostly) of modern and contemporary art many in Stanford collections -- that pose significant condition and/or conservation challenges for long term maintenance and display. Together we will examine the objects in the conservation lab and/or the gallery; students will then confer with appropriate museum staff, consult relevant curatorial and conservation files, research and debate potential treatments, and write up reports of their findings. Issues of aesthetics, ethics and other problems bearing on the material longevity of art will be explored together in class discussions as a foundation for thinking about the preservation and exhibition of works of art.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 405: Art, Ekphrasis, and Music in Byzantium and Islam (CLASSICS 376)

Focus is on the interrelation of art, architecture, verbal description, poetry, and music, including the singing of psalms and recitation of the Qur'an. How ekphrasis, the style of writing vividly intended to transform the listeners into spectators, structures the perception of and response to artistic production be it an art object, building, or a musical performance. The role of ekphrasis in animating the inanimate and the importance of breath and spirit, which become manifest in visual, acoustic, olfactory, and gustatory terms. Religious and courtly settings: Hagia Sophia, the Great Palace of Constantinople, the Dome of the Rock, the palaces of Baghdad and Samarra, the mosque at Cordoba, Medinat al-Zahra and the Alhambra. Greek and Arabic writers on ekphrasis in translation, juxtaposing the medieval material to the ancient theories of ekphrasis and modern scholarship.
Last offered: Autumn 2013
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints