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21 - 30 of 187 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGLISH 11A: Introduction to English II: From Milton to the Romantics

English majors must take class for 5 units. Major moments in English literary history, from John Milton's 'Paradise Lost' to John Keats's 'Hyperion'. The trajectory involves a variety of literary forms, including Augustan satire, the illuminated poetry of William Blake's handcrafted books, the historical novel invented by Sir Walter Scott, the society novel of Jane Austen, and William Wordsworth's epic of psychological and artistic development. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them civil war, religious dissent, revolution, commercialization, colonialism, and industrialization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ENGLISH 11B: Introduction to English II: American Literature and Culture to 1855 (AMSTUD 150)

A survey of early American writings, including sermons, poetry, captivity and slave narratives, essays, autobiography, and fiction, from the colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 11C: Introduction to English II: Revolutionary Energies: Milton and the Transcendentalists

This course will study four literary masterpieces in depth: John Milton's Paradise Lost (1667; 1674); Book 4 of Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726); Jane Austen's Persuasion (1817); and Herman Melville's Moby Dick (1851). All of these works are complex and will repay close study. But they also work their way into an ongoing literary conversation in the western world and in that sense serve as touchstones for later writers. We will consider each work not only for its own aesthetic accomplishment but also in sometimes passionate debate with its author's historical circumstances.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5

ENGLISH 12A: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AFRICAAM 43, AMSTUD 12A)

In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond. English majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 12B: Introduction to English III: Literature and the Crises of Humanism

Traces the development of British and American literature from 1850 to present in relation to nineteenth and twentieth-century crises of humanism. Starting with the realist novel, we will explore how poetry and fiction challenged and reinforced the exclusion of certain classes of people from full humanity. We will see how modernist writers demolished humanist norms of character and plot, and weigh literature¿s responses to the inhumanities of WWII and totalitarianism. Finally, we will encounter critiques of the humanist legacy from postcolonial and ethnic writers, and from posthuman speculative fiction. Concludes with a discussion of humanism and the ¿humanities¿ today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 14Q: It's the Freakiest Show: David Bowie's Intertextual Imagination

David Bowie's career began in the early 60s with a mix of folk, rock, and psychedelia; he then helped define an era with his performance of a gender bending, glam rock alien prior to engaging with German expressionism and minimalist electronic music; in the `80s, he brought a generation to the dance floor with chart topping hits before turning to drum `n bass and industrial music for inspiration; he finished his life as an enigmatic but engaged artist releasing poignant albums until his death. Through these many transitions, Bowie had a constant ¿ he was a voracious reader ¿ a practice that informed his work throughout his life.n nIn this class students will explore the place of literature in the work of musician, actor, and visual artist David Bowie. They will consider how Bowie's work embodies, questions, critiques, and engages with ¿the literary.¿ This course will focus on the relationship between Bowie's artistic output and work by other artists, both canonical and Avant Garde such more »
David Bowie's career began in the early 60s with a mix of folk, rock, and psychedelia; he then helped define an era with his performance of a gender bending, glam rock alien prior to engaging with German expressionism and minimalist electronic music; in the `80s, he brought a generation to the dance floor with chart topping hits before turning to drum `n bass and industrial music for inspiration; he finished his life as an enigmatic but engaged artist releasing poignant albums until his death. Through these many transitions, Bowie had a constant ¿ he was a voracious reader ¿ a practice that informed his work throughout his life.n nIn this class students will explore the place of literature in the work of musician, actor, and visual artist David Bowie. They will consider how Bowie's work embodies, questions, critiques, and engages with ¿the literary.¿ This course will focus on the relationship between Bowie's artistic output and work by other artists, both canonical and Avant Garde such as Andy Warhol, Iggy Pop, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Elliot, and William Burroughs. It will involve close readings of song lyrics and comparative reading of albums with literary forms such as the novel, poetry, and critical essay. We will also consider how Bowie's music was fueled by and in turn inspires new relationships between music, literature, cinema, and theater.n nThroughout, students will engage with and apply theories of writing, reading, and authorship and will explore questions of time, place, style, gender, and mortality. In addition to written analytical work, students will produce their own creative projects (poem, short story, song, album cover, etc.) in relation to something they find interesting or inspiring in Bowie¿s ouvre. Students will compose in varied modes (speaking, writing, video), in varied situations, and for varied audiences. Doing so, will enable students to explore the interplay between written, oral, and visual forms of communication, learn skills and strategies of oral delivery, and craft messages for both academic and public audiences.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2
Instructors: Naiman, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 16Q: Family Stories

This creative writing workshop will explore the idea of family. We¿ll begin with our questions: How do we conceptualize the word family? How do family histories, stories, mythologies, and languages shape our narratives? What does family have to do with the construction of a self? How can we investigate the self and all of its many contexts in writing? We¿ll consider how we might work from our questions in order to craft work that is meaningful and revealing. Students will have the opportunity to write in both poetry and prose, as well as to develop their own creative cross-genre projects. Along the way, we¿ll discuss elements of craft essential to strong writing: how to turn the self into a speaker; how create the world of a piece through image, detail, and metaphor; how to craft beautiful sentences and lines; how to find a form; and many other topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Perham, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 17N: Animal Poems

Animals have always appealed to the human imagination. This course provides basic a rubric for analyzing a variety of animal poems in order (1) to make you better readers of poetry and (2) to examine some of the most pressing philosophical questions that have been raised in the growing field of animal studies. The animals that concern us here are not allegorical¿the serpent as evil, the fox as cunning, the dove as a figure for love. Rather, they are creatures that, in their stubborn animality, provoke the imagination of the poet.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Gigante, D. (PI)
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