2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023 2023-2024
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 1 of 1 results for: LAW5006

LAW 5006: International Business Transactions and Litigation

Lawyers are increasingly asked to advise clients with global operations: Twitter reacts to free speech limitations in Turkey, governments around the world regulate Facebook's user data, Nike weighs the legal risk from factory fires in Bangladesh, investors consider spending billions in China without legal protections common elsewhere, companies worry about the consequences of being complicit in human rights violations, governments threaten to expropriate intellectual and real property, and US litigators face court rulings abroad that may conflict with the orders of US courts. What legal problems arise when firms go global? Through a series of case studies, we put you in the driver's seat and ask you to consider the challenges of doing business around the world, subject to multiple and sometimes inconsistent national laws. We will examine how treaties, international agreements, and informal norms can constrain or supplement national laws and review the risks of doing business in nations whose laws are ineffective or unreliable. We also consider some of the costs of globalization. We'll hear from current or former general counsel from global firms such as Intel and G.E. Special Instructions: Students who take this course have priority in the lottery for field study trips organized by the law school in September and during Spring Break. Elements used in grading: a short paper, class participation, and written assignments. This class is open to ALL students (except 1Ls), and is not limited to students enrolled in the Global Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints