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61 - 70 of 285 results for: all courses

BIOHOPK 47: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introducesnstudents to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods & statistical analysis. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will learn how to formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to the planet¿s dynamic habitats, as well as inquiry-based experience in how to explore and understand complex systems in nature. nThis course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci

BIOHOPK 81: Introduction to Ecology (BIOHOPK 183H)

The course is designed to provide background on key concepts in ecology, familiarize students with key ecological processes and ecosystems, and the methods used in ecological studies. The course will further build students' skills in critical scientific thinking, reading the literature, and scientific communication. A major goal of the course is to train students to ask questions in ecology, and to design, conduct and report studies addressing these questions. Thus, emphasis is also placed, in additional to general ecological concepts, on field observations, experimental design, and the analysis, interpretation and presentation of ecological data (through computer laboratories, written assignments and presentations). Written assignments, presentations and discussions are designed to provide experience in organizing and presenting information and to expose students to multiple perspectives on ecological processes and their applications.nThis course fulfills the same requirement as BIO 81.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 150H: Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 250H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous but not necessary.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 263H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 175H: Marine Science and Conservation in a Changing World (BIOHOPK 275H)

Graduate students register for 275H. This hands-on, experiential course provides a broad foundation in marine science, and explores emerging opportunities for innovation in the study of life in the sea. Students are resident at Stanfords Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (90 miles south of main campus) where the diverse organisms and environments of Monterey Bay provide the focus for the course. Class meets daily with lectures, discussions, labs, and field work throughout the day. Three linked concentrations¿each 3 weeks long¿are taught sequentially to address (1) the extraordinary diversity of marine organisms and habitats, (2) the physiology and behavior of marine animals, and (3) the principles of marine ecology. Connecting these concentrations is a weekly seminar-based discussion of topics in marine conservation. This design permits deep concentration on each subject, and places emphasis on discussion, group dialog, individual exploration, and experiential learning. In the final week of the quarter, students complete an individual capstone project of their choosing. For the Biology major, this course fulfills the same requirements as BIO 47 and BIO 81. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 182H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major. 2020-21 academic year offering of this course is dependent on COVID-19 regulations.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 183H: Introduction to Ecology (BIOHOPK 81)

The course is designed to provide background on key concepts in ecology, familiarize students with key ecological processes and ecosystems, and the methods used in ecological studies. The course will further build students' skills in critical scientific thinking, reading the literature, and scientific communication. A major goal of the course is to train students to ask questions in ecology, and to design, conduct and report studies addressing these questions. Thus, emphasis is also placed, in additional to general ecological concepts, on field observations, experimental design, and the analysis, interpretation and presentation of ecological data (through computer laboratories, written assignments and presentations). Written assignments, presentations and discussions are designed to provide experience in organizing and presenting information and to expose students to multiple perspectives on ecological processes and their applications.nThis course fulfills the same requirement as BIO 81.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 185H: Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 285H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on scientific diving and quantitative ecological methods in kelp forests.. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes, and subtidal field techniques. Class projects contribute to long-term monitoring at Hopkins Marine Station. It is recommended (but not required) that students complete the Stanford Scientific Diver Training session, typically offered prior to the start of the course. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; rescue scuba certification and scuba equipment.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 187H: Sensory Ecology (BIOHOPK 287H)

(Graduate students register for 287H.) Topics: the ways animals receive, filter, and process information gleaned from the environment, sensory receptor mechanisms, neural processing, specialization to life underwater, communication within and between species, importance of behavior to ecosystem structure and dynamics, impact of acoustic and light pollution on marine animals. Emphasis is on the current scientific literature. The laboratory portion of the class explores sensory mechanisms using neurobiological methods and methods of experimental animal behavior.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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