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141 - 150 of 635 results for: all courses

CLASSICS 84: The Romans (HISTORY 102A)

How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 88: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (HISTORY 114)

What¿s the history of `History¿? The first ancient historians wrote about commoners and kings, conquest and power¿those who had it, those who wanted it, those without it. Their powerful ways of recounting the past still resonate today and can be harnessed to tell new stories. We will look at how ancients like Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, and Livy turned stories about the past into compelling narratives of loss, growth and decline¿inventing ¿History¿ as we know it. All readings in English.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 112: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (TAPS 167)

Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 123: Ancient Medicine

Contemporary medical practice traces its origins to the creation of scientific medicine by Greek doctors such as Hippocrates and Galen. Is this something of which modern medicine can be proud? The scientific achievements and ethical limitations of ancient medicine when scientific medicine was no more than another form of alternative medicine. Scientific medicine competed in a marketplace of ideas where the boundaries between scientific and social aspects of medicine were difficult to draw.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Netz, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 124: Ancient and Modern Medicine

Imagine a world where the Universe has a built-in purpose and point. How would this belief impact man's place in nature? Imagine a world where natural substances have "powers." How might this impact diet and pharmacology? Magical vs. scientific healing: a clear divide? Disease and dehumanization: epilepsy, rabies. Physical and mental health: black bile and melancholy. The ethical and scientific assumptions hidden in medical language and imagery. How ancient medicine and modern medicine (especially alternative medicine) illuminate each other.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

CLASSICS 136: The Greek Invention of Mathematics

How was mathematics invented? A survey of the main creative ideas of ancient Greek mathematics. Among the issues explored are the axiomatic system of Euclid's Elements, the origins of the calculus in Greek measurements of solids and surfaces, and Archimedes' creation of mathematical physics. We will provide proofs of ancient theorems, and also learn how such theorems are even known today thanks to the recovery of ancient manuscripts.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 145: Early Christian Gospels (RELIGST 132D)

An exploration of Christian gospels of the first and second century. Emphasis on the variety of images and interpretations of Jesus and the good news, the broader Hellenistic and Jewish contexts of the gospels, the processes of developing and transmitting gospels, and the creation of the canon. Readings include the Gospel of John, the Gospel of Mark, the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Mary and other canonical and non-canonical gospels.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 150: Majors Seminar

Required of Classics majors and minors in junior or senior year; students contemplating honors should take this course in junior year. Advanced skills course involving close reading, critical thinking, editing, and writing. In-class and take-home writing and revising exercises. Final paper topic may be on any subject related to Classics. Fulfills WIM requirement for Classics. Winter Quarter Topic: Why Classics? The question is pressing both politically and intellectually and we will explore its long history, from the culture wars in ancient Greece and Rome, to modern conflicts about ownership of classical monuments and ideals, to the choice of whether to major in Classics today. Critical analysis, discussion, reading (all in English) and writing about case studies (Parthenon, Hadrian¿s Wall, Thucydides, Tacitus, ancient comedy and tragedy, textual transmission) exercising historical, literary and archaeological approaches. Spring Quarter Topic: Spectacles, Performances, and other Entertainments in the Ancient World. Leisure and entertainment in Greece and Rome. How were Greek and Roman private parties organized and what other activities took place during wine-drinking? Public spectacles and how they were experienced by the audiences. Musical, theatrical, athletic, poetic, and dance performances from the early archaic period to late antiquity. In exploring these topics, we will read primary ancient sources (in English), and analyze a wide range of paintings and sculpture.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 154: Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean (ARCHLGY 145)

Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 161: Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period (ARTHIST 101)

This lecture course explores Greek art and culture from 1000-480. In the beginning archaic art forms are more abstract than life-like, closer to Calder than Michelangelo. While Homer describes the rippling muscles (and egos) of his heroes, vase-painters and sculptors prefer abstraction. This changes in the 7th C. as a result of commerce with the Near East and Egypt. Imported Near Eastern bronzes and ivories awaken the Greeks to a wider range of subjects, techniques and ambitions. Later in the century, Greeks in Egypt learn to carve hard stone from Egyptian masters. Throughout the 6th C. Greek artists assimilate what they had borrowed, compete with one another, defy their teachers, test the tolerance of the gods and eventually produce works of art that speak with a Greek accent. When the Persians invade the Acropolis in 480, they find artifacts with little trace of alien influence or imprint - omens of the defiant Greek military that would prevail at Salamis and Plataea.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)
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