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181 - 190 of 253 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 387: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, JAPAN 185, JAPAN 285)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ARTHIST 388A: The History of Modern and Contemporary Japanese and Chinese Architecture and Urbanism (ARTHIST 188A)

The recent rapid urbanization and architectural transformation of Asia; focus is on the architecture of Japan and China since the mid-19th century. History of forms, theories, and styles that serve as the foundation for today's buildings and cityscapes. How Eastern and Western ideas of modernism have merged or diverged and how these forces continue to shape the future of Japanese and Chinese architecture and urban form.
Last offered: Spring 2011

ARTHIST 388B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art (ARTHIST 188B)

Chinese artistic engagements with international arenas and with the cultural politics of modernity, from the late 19th century to the present. Topics will include Shanghai modernity and public media; artistic reform and political activism at the end of empire; competition between national style painting and international modernisms; politicized arts of resistance and revolution; post-Mao era experimental and avant-garde movements; transnational careers and exhibition circuits.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ARTHIST 389C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 189C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 400M: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (ARTHIST 200M)

An exploration of the low status of artists in a culture that valued their work but not the men themselves. Potters were especially scorned but even sculptors of gold and ivory statues were seen as "mechanics" (Herodotus), with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon), "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch). Topics include case studies of individual artists, their importance to the polis, their workshops, wages and occupational hazards and the impact of social isolation on the quality of their work.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 405: Art, Ekphrasis, and Music in Byzantium and Islam (CLASSICS 376)

Focus is on the interrelation of art, architecture, verbal description, poetry, and music, including the singing of psalms and recitation of the Qur'an. How ekphrasis, the style of writing vividly intended to transform the listeners into spectators, structures the perception of and response to artistic production be it an art object, building, or a musical performance. The role of ekphrasis in animating the inanimate and the importance of breath and spirit, which become manifest in visual, acoustic, olfactory, and gustatory terms. Religious and courtly settings: Hagia Sophia, the Great Palace of Constantinople, the Dome of the Rock, the palaces of Baghdad and Samarra, the mosque at Cordoba, Medinat al-Zahra and the Alhambra. Greek and Arabic writers on ekphrasis in translation, juxtaposing the medieval material to the ancient theories of ekphrasis and modern scholarship.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 405A: Graduate Pedagogy Course

This course is designed for graduate students in Art History and Film Studies preparing to work as teaching assistants in the Department of Art and Art History. The seminar will focus on a range of theoretical and practical concerns pertaining to the successful conceptualization, organization, and execution of class lectures and discussion sections. Students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives and strategies related to quality teaching at the college level.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

ARTHIST 405B: Iberian World Architecture (ARTHIST 205B)

The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what it means to encounter, study, and write about an architectural phenomenon of transoceanic cohesion within competing chronologies, and how that experience should transform us in return: it is no coincidence that after pondering the art and architecture of the Iberian World and its roots, Kubler published his groundbreaking The Shape of Time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ARTHIST 406C: Nostos: The Survival of Antiquity in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 206C)

This seminar explores the processes of survival and activation of Greco-Roman art in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, modalities of reuse, trajectories of return (nostos), and the poetics of embodiment. Focusing on specific case studies from Italy, Spain, France, and England, this course offers in-depth analyses of some of the most remarkable artworks of the Middle Ages in different media, paying special attention to sculpture. Reading assignments will give students the background to engage critically with the thought of scholars such as A. Warburg, E. Panofsky, S. Freud, W. Benjamin, G. Agamben, M. Schapiro, P. Nora, L. Steinberg, and others, with the aim of gaining a rich theoretical perspective on Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) ¿ one of the central themes in the history of art from Vasari to the most recent Warburgian revival.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ARTHIST 407: The Resurrected Body: Animacy in Medieval Art

This course explores the relationship of spirit and matter in medieval art and architecture, more specifically how the changing appearance of objects and spaces evokes the presence of the metaphysical as glitter, reverberation, and shadow. We will engage objects and monuments across the Mediterranean, studying the way they were staged in order to produce the perception of liveliness. The phenomenology of liveliness will be tied to the development of the theology of resurrection of the body.
Last offered: Spring 2016
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