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151 - 160 of 207 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 410: The Masters: Raphael

Five hundred years after Raphael mysteriously died (April 6, 1520), this seminar reflects on his contributions to the arts. Raphael's art is often defined as a negation of death. He painted eternal myths, unearthly saints, and timeless beauties. His sketches served as exemplars and the very paragon of drawing for hundreds of years. So much so that art historians have done little more than admire his art. How come Raphael has resisted criticism for half a millennium? What does his unremitting fame tell us about the state of art history? While studying eight of Raphael's masterpieces in depth, this course also reflects on the shortcomings and potentials of art history as a critical discipline. [Undergraduate enrollment with consent of one of the instructors].
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 411: Childish Enthusiasms, Perishable Manias (FILMEDIA 411)

Universities are sites of gravitas, but what of levitas -- a lighter, more playful category? Does intellectually credible work depend upon a ⿿critical distance⿝ between scholar and object of study? Can we take something seriously without imposing a seriousness that it may not possess (or want)? How to retain (or recover) the intensely pleasurable relation to objects that we were allowed when younger? The seminar is predicated upon the proposition that effective scholarship need not suck the joy from the world.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 412: Desiring Machines: Buildings, Maps, and Clouds (ARTHIST 212, COMPLIT 212A, COMPLIT 312A, ILAC 212A, ILAC 312A)

Focus is on early modern machines as tools for experience and action. In their break with Freudian psychoanalysis, French theorists Deleuze and Guattari speak of the machine as a tool of desire and attraction itself as "machinic" rather than desire for something that is missing. The goal of this course is to equip students with a different way of thinking by exploring a large group of objects from the early modern world (poems, buildings, costumes, maps, nets, and clouds) that help us to approach the period in a new way.
Last offered: Winter 2022

ARTHIST 417: Architecture, Mysticism, and Myth (ARTHIST 217)

This course examines global origin myths for architecture, for example cosmic symbolism (e.g. the Mandala/dome), and the magic of technologies (e.g. the "petrification" of the wooden hut in permanent architecture). Examples range from Ethiopian rockcut churches, to the Parthenon, to the Ise Grand Shrine, to Fire Temples, and Navajo lodges. The course concludes with the modern mythology of industrialisation and the mechanised building.

ARTHIST 417B: Architectural Design Theory (ARTHIST 217B)

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture.  Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media.  nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice.  nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.nCEE 32B is a crosslisting of ARTHIST 217B/417B.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 418A: Michelangelo: Gateway to Early Modern Italy (ARTHIST 218A, HISTORY 237B, HISTORY 337B, ITALIAN 237, ITALIAN 337)

Revered as one of the greatest artists in history, Michelangelo Buonarroti's extraordinarily long and prodigious existence (1475-1564) spanned the Renaissance and the Reformation in Italy. The celebrity artist left behind not only sculptures, paintings, drawings, and architectural designs, but also an abundantly rich and heterogeneous collection of artifacts, including direct and indirect correspondence (approximately 1400 letters), an eclectic assortment of personal notes, documents and contracts, and 302 poems and 41 poetic fragments. This course will explore the life and production of Michelangelo in relation to those of his contemporaries. Using the biography of the artist as a thread, this interdisciplinary course will draw on a range of critical methodologies and approaches to investigate the civilization and culture of Italy in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Course themes will follow key tensions that defined the period and that found expression in Michelangelo: physical-spiritual, classical-Christian, tradition-innovation, individual-collective.
Last offered: Spring 2022

ARTHIST 421: Art and Visual Culture in Europe: The 1920s and 30s

This seminar focuses attention on European art institutions, exhibitions, journals, and movements, most of which intersected with one another across national borders during the interwar period, including Cubism, De Stijl, Purism, Art Deco, the Bauhaus, and Surrealism. Media include painting, architecture, photography, film, fashion and (graphic) design. We will examine period sources in Stanford library special collections and visit the permanent collection at SFMOMA.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 424: Architecture as Performance from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (ARTHIST 224)

This seminar examines the nature of architectural representation in the western tradition, from antiquity until the 18th century. It considers the ancient theatre as an icon of representation and the afterlife of the stage building as a model for western architecture, including ephemera. It concludes a distinction between the theatrical and the more recent concept of the theatrical.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ARTHIST 426: New Landscapes of China: Ecologies, Media, Imaginaries (ARTHIST 226)

An exploration of new forms of landscape art in China's contemporary era, 1980s-present. Studies of new media platforms for landscape related imagery, imagined landscapes, and expanded concepts of landscape in an era of heightened ecological consciousness.
Last offered: Spring 2022

ARTHIST 430: Cinema and Ideology (FILMEDIA 430)

The relationship between cinema and ideology from theoretical and historical perspectives, emphasizing Marxist and psychoanalytic approaches. The practice of political filmmaking, and the cinema as an audiovisual apparatus and socio-cultural institution. Topics include: dialectics; revolutionary aesthetics; language and power; commodity fetishism; and nationalism. Filmmakers include Dziga Vertov, Jean-Luc Godard, Bruce Conner, and Marco Ferreri. Theoretical writers include Karl Marx, Sergei Eisenstein, and Slavoj Zizek. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2019
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