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221 - 230 of 339 results for: CSI::certificate

INTLPOL 358: Business, Social Responsibility, and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, more »
Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? --What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? We will learn through seminar-style discussion, lectures, role play, and small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide insights from their experiences on the ground. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a long research paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 1047).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

INTNLREL 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTLPOL 230, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 123: The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 135A: International Environmental Law and Policy: Oceans and Climate Change

This seminar offers an introduction to International Environmental Law, with a strong emphasis on oceans and climate change, its underlying principles, how it is developed and implemented, and the challenges of enforcing it. We will focus on oceans and climate change, exploring the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS) and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC). We will explain why these agreements are described as ¿umbrella conventions¿ and how new conventions like the Paris Agreement fit within them. There will be guest speakers, a negotiation simulation, and a legal design sprint focused on re-imagining International Environmental Law.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Chand, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

This course explores the normative demands and definitions of justice that transcend the nation-state and its borders, through the lenses of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. What are our duties (if any) towards those who live in other countries? Should we be held morally responsible for their suffering? What if we have contributed to it? Should we be asked to remedy it? At what cost? These are some of the questions driving the course. Although rooted in political theory and philosophy, the course will examine contemporary problems that have been addressed by other scholarly disciplines, public debates, and popular media, such as immigration and open borders, climate change refugees, and the morality of global capitalism (from exploitative labor to blood diamonds). As such, readings will combine canonical pieces of political theory and philosophy with readings from other scholarly disciplines, newspaper articles, and popular media.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

INTNLREL 141A: Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED
Instructors: Bojic, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 384C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 808G: Policy Practicum: Alabama Innovation

Cross-listed with the Graduate School of Business ( GSBGEN 587). Client: Innovate Alabama, https://innovatealabama.org/. The newly established Alabama Innovation Commission, known as Innovate Alabama, has sought policy recommendations from a group of faculty at Stanford University, including representatives from Stanford Law School and the Stanford Graduate School of Business. The goal of the Alabama Innovation Commission is to identify and present to policymakers policies that will promote innovation, entrepreneurship, economic development, and high-skilled jobs in the state. In this policy lab, students will work on papers whose results will be incorporated with attribution into the recommendations provided to the Commission and the Governor. Where possible, projects will be conducted in partnership with students at the major research universities in Alabama. Available topics for projects include building on the state's existing competencies in medical research and space and defense more »
Cross-listed with the Graduate School of Business ( GSBGEN 587). Client: Innovate Alabama, https://innovatealabama.org/. The newly established Alabama Innovation Commission, known as Innovate Alabama, has sought policy recommendations from a group of faculty at Stanford University, including representatives from Stanford Law School and the Stanford Graduate School of Business. The goal of the Alabama Innovation Commission is to identify and present to policymakers policies that will promote innovation, entrepreneurship, economic development, and high-skilled jobs in the state. In this policy lab, students will work on papers whose results will be incorporated with attribution into the recommendations provided to the Commission and the Governor. Where possible, projects will be conducted in partnership with students at the major research universities in Alabama. Available topics for projects include building on the state's existing competencies in medical research and space and defense technology; assessing financial incentives for attracting businesses; deploying broadband-based education; fostering the role of universities in economic development; and drawing high-skilled workers through opportunities for outdoor recreation. Students admitted to the lab will work on one of the following projects (to be determined according to the priorities of the client): 1.) Business Incentives and Prosperity. High profile competitions for the headquarters of large corporations often lead states to offer large incentive packages. States that land the deal are often perceived as the winners. Some recruitment initiatives indeed bring substantial local economic benefits, yet recent research has called into question many commonly-held beliefs about state incentives. Such incentives often may have costs that exceed benefits, and there is some question even as to whether they increase local economic activity at the margin in most cases. This project will evaluate Alabama's existing incentives for attracting businesses and make recommendations based on the successes and failures of recent incentive programs around the country. The project will weigh the potential for traditional recruitment tactics such as tax incentives and subsidized industrial sites against alternatives such as infrastructure development, skills development programs, and customized business services. (S. Haber and J. Rauh). 2.) Deploying Broadband-Based Education. The future of Alabama rests on the talent and knowledge of its citizens so the success of K-12 public education must be a potent driver of human capital development. The work of the Stanford-AL team will look at the current and potential for deploying broadband-based education throughout the state to augment the current capacities of K-12 educators to deliver high quality instruction, especially in the priority areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) which ties in closely to economic development plans for the state. (M. Raymond). 3.) Fostering the Role of Universities. It is widely recognized that universities are key to the development of innovative economic activity at the state and local level. The most productive local innovation economies in the US have emerged in locations such as Silicon Valley, North Carolina's Research Triangle, and the Boston area, powered by research that has emerged from local universities. Success stories of the impact of universities on the innovative ecosystem also abound in smaller markets in recent decades. This project will aim to make specific, concrete recommendations for state government policy to build on the strength of Alabama's universities to grow Alabama's technology and innovation economy. (R. Banks and J. Rauh). 4.) The Outdoor Recreation Lab. Persuading someone to move thousands of miles to a new home, a new community, and a new state is not an event; it is a process. It often starts with a short visit that plants a seed in a person's mind. Those crucial, initial, short visits often occur because of tourism; and when it comes to people who have invested in human capital that is specific to high technology industries, that tourism tends to be focused on outdoor recreation. Outdoor recreation tourism is not, however, simply a way to draw high-skilled workers into a state; it is also a way to share the economic rents generated by high tech industries with rural areas. It is the working hypothesis of the Outdoor Recreation Lab that Alabama's Cumberland Plateau has necessary environmental characteristics to be a draw for high tech workers and entrepreneurs/and thus be an important part of building and sustaining a more innovative Alabama economy--but that potential has not been fully developed. The purpose of the Outdoor Recreation Lab is to assess the hypothesis that the Cumberland Plateau is an underdeveloped resource for the State of Alabama. Specifically, the lab will assess its natural endowments as compared to its physical and business infrastructure. An important component of this assessment is the extent of public lands, the interpretation of "public trust" in Alabama law regarding access to navigable rivers and streams, and the number and identity of agencies that would have to be coordinated to provide access to those lands and waterways. It will also learn about the attempts--both successful and not--by other states to leverage natural endowments to generate in-migration by tech workers and entrepreneurs. (S. Haber). Additional sub-projects if students are interested may include deep dives into how Alabama can build on existing competencies in Medical Research and in Space/Defense technology to foster the further development of its economy and technology center. The lab seeks students from the law and business schools, the graduate MS&E program, and other graduate students with a background in entrepreneurship and/or local governance. Students who have ties to Alabama are especially invited to apply. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. GSB students should sign up under GSBGEN 587. SLS students should go through the SLS Registrar's application portal: https://registrar.law.stanford.edu/
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance privat more »
Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 2513: Climate: Politics, Finance, and Infrastructure

While climate change is often considered an 'environmental problem', the risks and opportunities embedded in a changing climate go well beyond the natural environment. This course reframes climate as a macroeconomic challenge, one in which multilateral politics, global investment, and distribution of impacts must be understood and reconsidered. Based on readings and guest speakers, this interdisciplinary course traces the arc of climate past, present and future on the pillars of politics, finance, and infrastructure (both physical and institutional). Grounded in the latest climate science and the history of global climate negotiations, the bulk of the course will investigate innovations at the intersection of finance, law and policy, with particular emphasis on risk management, legal liability, corporations, climate justice and resilience. The final sessions will consider the future, taking a look at how the next generation of leaders might solve the greatest challenge of our time. Ele more »
While climate change is often considered an 'environmental problem', the risks and opportunities embedded in a changing climate go well beyond the natural environment. This course reframes climate as a macroeconomic challenge, one in which multilateral politics, global investment, and distribution of impacts must be understood and reconsidered. Based on readings and guest speakers, this interdisciplinary course traces the arc of climate past, present and future on the pillars of politics, finance, and infrastructure (both physical and institutional). Grounded in the latest climate science and the history of global climate negotiations, the bulk of the course will investigate innovations at the intersection of finance, law and policy, with particular emphasis on risk management, legal liability, corporations, climate justice and resilience. The final sessions will consider the future, taking a look at how the next generation of leaders might solve the greatest challenge of our time. Elements used in grading: Students may take the course for 2 units (section 1) or 3 units (section 2). Section 1 and 2 students will both receive grades for attendance, in class participation and guest-speaker questions. Section 1 students will also complete a group presentation on the design of a financial, business, legal or policy intervention with the potential to reduce emissions on a large scale. Section 2 students will be required to write an individual research paper meeting the Law School's R paper requirements. This class is limited to 30 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (15 students will be selected by lottery) and 15 non-law students by consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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