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131 - 140 of 339 results for: CSI::certificate

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Artiles, A. (PI)

EDUC 339: Advanced Topics in Quantitative Policy Analysis

For doctoral students. How to develop a researchable question and research design, identify data sources, construct conceptual frameworks, and interpret empirical results. Presentation by student participants and scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

EDUC 342: Child Development and New Technologies

Focus is on the experiences computing technologies afford children and how these experiences might influence development. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework for understanding how computing technologies interact with the social ecology of the child and how children actively use technology to meet their own goals. Emphasis is on influences of interactive technology on cognitive development, identity, and social development equity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EDUC 360: Child Development in Contexts of Risk and Adversity

This course provides an overview of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the study of child development in contexts of risk and adversity. We will begin by discussing different approaches to conceptualizing and measuring exposure to risk and adversity as well as conceptualizing and measuring children's adaptation. We will review different theoretical frameworks and empirical models that researchers employ to identify factors and processes that are associated with resilient or maladaptive developmental outcomes and trajectories over time. Finally, we will discuss how exemplar biological, family, school, cultural, and economic processes contribute to our understanding of children's adaptation and resilience. Throughout the course, we will discuss limitations of current research, directions for future research, and the translation of research findings for practitioners and policy makers. We will also consider equity issues relevant to studying adversity and adaptive functioning in diverse groups of children. Students will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in the course to develop a research proposal that is aligned with their own interests and work.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EDUC 366: Learning in Formal and Informal Environments

How learning opportunities are organized in schools and non-school settings including museums, after-school clubs, community art centers, theater groups, aquariums, sports teams, and new media contexts. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework. Readings from empirical journals, web publications, and books.Collaborative written or multimedia research project in which students observe and document a non-school learning environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EDUC 368: Cognitive Development in Childhood and Adolescence

This course aims to broaden and deepen students¿ understanding of cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. It will examine various theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to different domains of cognitive development, such as neurobiological plasticity, infant cognition, theory of mind, memory, language, and executive functions. Throughout the course, as we survey research findings, we will discuss (1) methods that researchers have employed in their study of cognitive development; (2) limitations of current research and directions for future research; and (3) translation of research findings for practitioners and policymakers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EDUC 371: Social Psychology and Social Change (PSYCH 265)

The course is intended as an exploration of the major ideas, theories, and findings of social psychology and their applied status. Special attention will be given to historical issues, classic experiments, and seminal theories, and their implications for topics relevant to education. Contemporary research will also be discussed. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students from other disciplines are welcome, but priority for enrollment will be given to graduate students. In order to foster a vibrant, discussion-based class, enrollment will be capped at 20 students. Interested students should enroll in the class through simple enroll or axess. There will be an application process on the first day of class if there is overwhelming interest. Please contact the course TA, Isabelle Tay (isabelletay[at]stanford.edu), if you have any further questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

EDUC 377B: Impact: Strategic Leadership of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

(Same as STRAMGT 368). This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jonker, K. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy, Inclusivity and Leadership

(Same as GSBGEN 581) A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, influence, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Regardless of one's age, background or profession, everyone has the potential to lead in a way that both tackles the complex social problems our interconnected world faces and creates greater inclusivity, access and impact. This demanding two-week, compressed course will provide passionate students with a brave space to develop and refine a plan for their own social change journey and amplify their potential to give, live and lead in a way that matters more. Using design thinking, students will challenge their preconceptions and wrestle with their social change approach, their privileged position as future Stanford graduates and philanthropy's role in society. Lectures and class discussions will inspire and prepare students to create social value with greater intentionality and humility. For the first class, s more »
(Same as GSBGEN 581) A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, influence, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Regardless of one's age, background or profession, everyone has the potential to lead in a way that both tackles the complex social problems our interconnected world faces and creates greater inclusivity, access and impact. This demanding two-week, compressed course will provide passionate students with a brave space to develop and refine a plan for their own social change journey and amplify their potential to give, live and lead in a way that matters more. Using design thinking, students will challenge their preconceptions and wrestle with their social change approach, their privileged position as future Stanford graduates and philanthropy's role in society. Lectures and class discussions will inspire and prepare students to create social value with greater intentionality and humility. For the first class, students will submit a proposed social impact plan for their professional, philanthropic and civic lives. Over the course's six sessions, students will refine their plan, creating a formal theory of change that strategically utilizes their unique leadership platform and asset portfolio to advance opportunity and justice for a target population. Potential guest speakers include Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation; Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org; Crystal Hayling, Executive Director of the Libra Foundation; Rob Reich of Stanford PACS and Laura Muñoz Arnold, Co-Chair of the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
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