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111 - 120 of 228 results for: SOC

SOC 229X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Last offered: Winter 2018

SOC 230: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 130)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

SOC 231: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 136, EDUC 306D)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

SOC 232: Genetics and Society (EDUC 373)

This course will focus on social science engagement with developments in genetic research, focusing on two key issues. First, social scientists are trying to figure out how genetic data can be used to help them better understand phenomena they have been long endeavoring to understand. Second, social scientists try to improve understanding of how social environments moderate, amplify, or attenuate genetic influences on outcomes.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

SOC 233A: Building and Leading Inclusive Organizations (SOC 133A)

This course takes a problem-solving focus. Our main goal is to learn to design research-based interventions to improve diversity, equity and inclusion outcomes in organizations. U.S. society has become increasingly more diverse, and yet our organizations do not reflect that diversity. Further, even successful efforts to improve diversity are often not accompanied by a plan to create truly inclusive organizations that support a diverse workforce or student body. We will begin by comparing explanations for the lack of diversity and inclusion in modern organizations. We will then examine research that illustrates the cost to individuals and organizations for failing to leverage the diverse talent in our society. Guest speakers will share their challenges and successes in increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the organizations where they work. Then, it will be your turn. Working in teams you will design your own research-based intervention to promote DEI at the organizational, team, and individual level and present your intervention to the class. Along the way, you will also learn effective strategies for navigating non-inclusive organizations and for being an effective change agent in your own environment.

SOC 235: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States (SOC 135)

Over the last three decades, inequality in America has increased substantially. Why has this happened, and what can be done about it? The course will begin by surveying the basic features of poverty, inequality, and economic mobility in the 21st century. From here we will discuss issues related to discrimination, education and schools, criminal justice, and the changing nature of the family as forces that shape inequality. We will also focus on the main social policy options for addressing inequality in the United States, including income support for the poor, taxing higher incomes, efforts to encourage philanthropy, and other institutional reforms.
Last offered: Winter 2019

SOC 236: Sociology of Law (SOC 136)

(Graduate students register for 236) This course explores major issues and debates in the sociology of law. Topics include historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance, with particular attention to the problem of mass incarceration; the "law in action" versus the "law on the books;" organizational responses to law, particularly in the context of sexual harassment and discrimination in education and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change with particular emphasis on the American civil rights movement. Special Instructions: Students are expected to attend a weekly TA-led discussion section in addition to lecture. Sections will be scheduled after the start of term at times when all students can attend. Paper requirements are flexible. Cross listed with the Law School ( LAW 7511). See "Special Instructions" in course description above. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, paper proposal, three short papers and a final paper (see syllabus for details).
Last offered: Winter 2020

SOC 238: Market Oriented Policies in Education (EDUC 238)

Introducing market dynamics in education remains a highly controversial policy issue. In this course we will discuss the main ideas supporting the market approach in education and the key arguments against these policies; we will also review some of the evidence concerning the effects of market policies in education such as privatization, vouchers, and school choice; and finally, we will study several issues related to market oriented reforms, such as performance accountability, school segregation, and peer effects in education.
Last offered: Spring 2020

SOC 241: Monitoring the Crisis (PSYCH 145A, PUBLPOL 141, SOC 141, URBANST 149)

A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbWMGw/viewformnnThe course is open to students who have taken it in earlier quarters, with repeating students allowed to omit the training sessions and, in lieu of those sessions, complete additional field work and writing. Field work will include unique interviews with new participants each lab period, along with corresponding coding, analyses, and reports.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

SOC 241P: Public Interest Tech: Case Studies (SOC 141P)

What does public interest technology look like in practice? Each week, a guest speaker will present a case study of their work to improve government and public systems through innovative methods, data-driven efforts, emerging technology, and human-centered design. Students will reflect on the practicalities, ethics, and best practices of public interest technology work.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Repeatable 16 times (up to 16 units total)
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