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321 - 330 of 362 results for: all courses

SOC 118: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 218)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 119: Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s (SOC 219)

The demographic, economic, political, and cultural roots of social change in the 60s; its legacy in the present U.S.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 120: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 220)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 132: Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools (EDUC 110, EDUC 310, SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 135: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States (SOC 235)

Over the last three decades, inequality in America has increased substantially. Why has this happened, and what can be done about it? The course will begin by surveying the basic features of poverty, inequality, and economic mobility in the 21st century. From here we will discuss issues related to discrimination, education and schools, criminal justice, and the changing nature of the family as forces that shape inequality. We will also focus on the main social policy options for addressing inequality in the United States, including income support for the poor, taxing higher incomes, efforts to encourage philanthropy, and other institutional reforms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: King, M. (PI)

SOC 136: Sociology of Law (SOC 236)

(Graduate students register for 236) This course explores major issues and debates in the sociology of law. Topics include historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance, with particular attention to the problem of mass incarceration; the "law in action" versus the "law on the books;" organizational responses to law, particularly in the context of labor and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change with particular emphasis on the American civil rights movement. Special Instructions: Students are expected to attend a weekly TA-led discussion section in addition to lecture. Sections will be scheduled after the start of term at times when all students can attend. Paper requirements are flexible. See "Special Instructions" in course description above. Cross-listed with Law 7511. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, paper proposal, three short papers and a final paper (see syllabus for details).
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 138: American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective (NATIVEAM 138, SOC 238)

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul
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