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261 - 270 of 285 results for: all courses

PHYSICS 83N: Physics in the 21st Century

Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics ¿ everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nnWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome more »
Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics ¿ everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nnWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome to contribute to the discussion about these big ideas. Learning Goals: By the end of the quarter you will be able to explain the major questions that drive physics research to your friends and peers. You will understand how scientists study the impossibly small and impossibly large and be able to convey this knowledge in clear and concise terms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Kuo, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 96N: Harmony and the Universe

Harmony is a multifaceted concept that has profoundly connects music, mathematics, physics, philosophy, physiology, and psychology. We will explore the evolution of our understanding of harmony and its immediate application in the function of musical instruments, and employ it as a nexus to understand its role in revolutionary scientific advances in gravity, relativity, quantum mechanics, and cosmology. In these explorations, we will examine some of the fundamental mathematical tools which provide us our current understanding of harmony. We will also see how the some concepts surrounding harmony are in tension, if not conflict, and how some great thinkers have followed them down down blind alleys and dead ends. The aim of the course is to show the enormous consequences of harmony in the evolution of our understanding of the universe, and how science itself progresses in fits, starts, and setbacks as old ideas intermingle with new developments. We will also see how objective/quantitative aspects of harmony interact with subjective/qualitative considerations, and how cultural perspectives and prejudices can affect the progression of science.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Tanaka, H. (PI)

PHYSICS 100: Introduction to Observational Astrophysics

Designed for undergraduate physics majors but open to all students with a calculus-based physics background and some laboratory and coding experience. Students make and analyze observations using the telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Topics covered include navigating the night sky, the physics of stars and galaxies, telescope instrumentation and operation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques, quantitative error analysis, and effective scientific communication. The course concludes with an independent project where student teams propose and execute an observational astronomy project of their choosing, using techniques learned in class to gather and analyze their data, and presenting their findings in the forms of professional-style oral presentations and research papers. Enrollment by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: https://forms.gle/kXzpiMSRLjWKqY826. If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 105: Intermediate Physics Laboratory I: Analog Electronics

Introductory laboratory electronics, designed for Physics and Engineering Physics majors but open to all students with science or engineering interests in analog circuits, instrumentation and signal processing. The course is focused on laboratory exercises that build skills needed for measurements, including sensors, amplification and filtering, and fundamentals of noise in physical systems. The hands-on lab exercises include DC circuits, RC and diode circuits, applications of operational amplifiers, non-linear circuits and optoelectronics. The class exercises build towards a lock-in amplifier contest where each lab section designs and builds a synchronous detection system to measure a weak optical signal, with opportunities to understand the limits of the design, build improvements and compare results with the other lab sections. The course focuses on practical techniques and insight from the lab exercises, with a goal to prepare undergraduates for laboratory research. No formal electronics experience is required beyond exposure to concepts from introductory Physics or Engineering courses (Ohm's law, charge conservation, physics of capacitors and inductors, etc.). Recommended prerequisite: Physics 43 or 63, or Engineering 40A or 40M.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 107: Intermediate Physics Laboratory II: Experimental Techniques and Data Analysis

Experiments on lasers, Gaussian optics, and atom-light interaction, with emphasis on data and error analysis techniques. Students describe a subset of experiments in scientific paper format. Prerequisites: completion of PHYSICS 40 or PHYSICS 60 series, and PHYSICS 70 and PHYSICS 105. Recommended pre- or corequisites: PHYSICS 120 and 130. WIM
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 108: Advanced Physics Laboratory: Project

Have you ever wanted to dream up a research question, then design, execute, and analyze an experiment to address it, together with a small group of your fellow students? This is an accelerated, guided experimental research experience, resembling real frontier research. Phenomena that have been studied include magnetization of ferromagnets, quantum hall effect in graphene, interference in superconducting circuits, loss in nanomechanical resonators, and superfluidity in helium. But most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter and recently also particle physics) have never been done in the class before. Our equipment and apparatus for Physics 108 are very flexible, not standardized like in most other lab classes. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Often, with instructors' help, students obtain unique samples from Stanford research groups. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 105, or other experience in electronics. Suggested but less critical: Physics 130 (many phenomena you mi more »
Have you ever wanted to dream up a research question, then design, execute, and analyze an experiment to address it, together with a small group of your fellow students? This is an accelerated, guided experimental research experience, resembling real frontier research. Phenomena that have been studied include magnetization of ferromagnets, quantum hall effect in graphene, interference in superconducting circuits, loss in nanomechanical resonators, and superfluidity in helium. But most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter and recently also particle physics) have never been done in the class before. Our equipment and apparatus for Physics 108 are very flexible, not standardized like in most other lab classes. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Often, with instructors' help, students obtain unique samples from Stanford research groups. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 105, or other experience in electronics. Suggested but less critical: Physics 130 (many phenomena you might study build on quantum mechanics) and Physics 107 (experience with data analysis and useful measurement tools: lock-in amplifier, spectrum analyzer.) We recommend taking this class in junior year if possible, as it can inform post-graduation decisions and can empower the professor to write a powerful letter of recommendation.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 110: Advanced Mechanics (PHYSICS 210)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Principle of least action, Euler-Lagrange equations. Small oscillations and beyond. Symmetries, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables. Introduction to classical field theory. Selected other topics, including nonlinear dynamical systems, attractors, chaotic motion. Undergraduates register for Physics 110 (4 units). Graduates register for Physics 210 (3 units). Prerequisites: MATH 131P or PHYSICS 111. Recommended prerequisite: PHYSICS 130.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 120: Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I

Vector analysis. Electrostatic fields, including boundary-value problems and multipole expansion. Dielectrics, static and variable magnetic fields, magnetic materials. Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 43 or PHYS 63; MATH 52 and MATH 53. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 111, MATH 131P or MATH 173. Recommended corequisite: PHYS 112.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 130: Quantum Mechanics I

The origins of quantum mechanics and wave mechanics. Schrödinger equation and solutions for one-dimensional systems. Commutation relations. Generalized uncertainty principle. Time-energy uncertainty principle. Separation of variables and solutions for three-dimensional systems; application to hydrogen atom. Spherically symmetric potentials and angular momentum eigenstates. Spin angular momentum. Addition of angular momentum. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 65 or PHYSICS 70 and PHYSICS 111 or MATH 131P or MATH 173. MATH 173 can be taken concurrently. Pre- or corequisites: PHYSICS 120.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hall, S. (PI)
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