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41 - 50 of 300 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 142: Architecture Since 1900 (CEE 32G)

Art 142 is an introduction to the history of architecture since 1900 and how it has shaped and been shaped by its cultural contexts. The class also investigates the essential relationship between built form and theory during this period.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 142A: The Architecture of Thought: Artists and Thinkers Design for Themselves (ARTHIST 342A)

This course investigates houses, hideaways, and studios that artists and thinkers have designed for themselves with varying degrees of self-consciousness, from subconscious images of the self to knowing stages for the contemplative life. Case studies range from antiquity to the present, from the studio-house of Peter Paul Rubens to that of Kurt Schwitters; from the house-museum of Sir John Soane to the Vittoriale of Gabriele D'Annunzio; from the philosophical dwelling of the Emperor Hadrian to that of Ludwig Wittgenstein.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 143A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 343A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 144: On Looking: Art, Obscenity, and the Ethics of Spectatorship

This course considers the ethics of looking at art, photography, and other forms of visual representation that have been declared obscene or indecent, whether by religious authorities, government officials, community representatives, or legal opinions. What are the ethical stakes of looking at such materials? And what are the ethical implications of looking away and insisting that others do so as well? nnThe creation of vanguard art since the late 19th-century has often been linked to the concept of transgression. Is it, we will ask, the modern artist's responsibility to challenge accepted standards of representation and the protocols of looking? If so, how are we, as viewers and students of art, to distinguish between legitimate art and unfit obscenity?
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ARTHIST 144B: Modern Design from the Eiffel Tower to Yves Saint Laurent (ARTHIST 344B)

Iconic episodes in the history of modern European and American design, including production, consumption, circulation and display -- from iron architecture of the department store and the universal exhibition to the branding practices of Andy Warhol and Yves Saint Laurent.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 145: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 345, FEMGEN 145)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 147: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 347)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 148: Art and the First Amendment: Testing the Limits of Expression (SIW 148)

This course will take place in Washington D.C.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ARTHIST 151: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 351, ASNAMST 151D, CSRE 151D)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect and help shape cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 152: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
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