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21 - 30 of 260 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 80A: Heritage and Human Rights (ARCHLGY 80)

What does archaeology have to say about human rights? Is there a right to cultural heritage? How can archaeology and heritage help protect rights¿or encroach upon them? Themes we will address in this course include the archaeological investigation of human rights topics; the right to heritage; conflicts of different rights regimes in heritage contexts; and ethical considerations about rights during research and heritage management. These questions will take us to cases as diverse as forensic investigation of the disappeared in Argentina, the archaeology of homelessness in the U.K., the destruction of heritage as cultural genocide in Bosnia and the Middle East, and the rights of indigenous groups in Australia and the U.S. to control cultural heritage.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 82P: The Literature of Psychosis (HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ANTHRO 84B: Incas, Spaniards, and Africans: Archaeology of the Kingdom of Peru (ARCHLGY 84)

Students are introduced to Andean archaeology from the rise of the Inca empire through the Spanish colonial period. We will explore archaeological evidence for the development of late pre-Hispanic societies in western South America, the Spanish conquest, and the origins of key Spanish colonial institutions in the Andean region: the Church, coerced indigenous labor, and African slavery. Central to this course is an archaeological interrogation of the underpinnings and legacies of colonialism, race, and capitalism in the region. Students will also consider the material culture of daily life and those living on the social margins, both in pre-Hispanic societies and under Spanish rule.
Last offered: Autumn 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 89: Undergraduate Reading Group

Undergraduate student reading group on a thematic topic of interest. Sections: All faculty.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 5 units total)

ANTHRO 90B: Theory of Cultural and Social Anthropology

This undergraduate seminar offers students the foundations of theory in social and cultural anthropology. Each section begins with a close reading of the work of a contemporary anthropologist and then traces the intellectual legacies that have shaped it. This is a required course for Anthropology majors. The course also fulfills the requirement for Writing in the Major (WIM). To sharpen students' critical writing skills, there will be several writing and rewriting assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 91: Method and Evidence in Anthropology

This course provides a broad introduction to various ways of designing anthropological questions and associated methods for collecting evidence and supporting arguments. We review the inherent links between how a question is framed, the types of evidence that can address the question, and way that data are collected. Research activities such as interviewing, participant observation, quantitative observation, archival investigation, ecological survey, linguistic methodology, tracking extended cases, and demographic methods are reviewed. Various faculty and specialists will be brought in to discuss how they use different types of evidence and methods for supporting arguments in anthropology. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kendra, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 91A: Archaeological Methods (ARCHLGY 102)

Methodological issues related to the investigation of archaeological sites and objects. Aims and techniques of archaeologists including: location and excavation of sites; dating of places and objects; analysis of artifacts and technology and the study of ancient people, plants, and animals. How these methods are employed to answer the discipline's larger research questions. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 92A: Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop

Practicum. Students develop independent research projects and write research proposals. How to formulate a research question; how to integrate theory and field site; and step-by-step proposal writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Kendra, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 92B: Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop

Practicum. Students develop independent research projects and write research proposals. How to formulate a research question; how to integrate theory and field site; and step-by-step proposal writing.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Kendra, A. (PI)
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