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31 - 40 of 286 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 246: Venture Creation for the Real Economy (MS&E 273)

A project-based course where teams of 4 prepare their entrepreneurial venture for fundraising and launch. Students acquire the experience of an early-stage entrepreneur as they progress through stages of team building, opportunity assessment, product-market fit analysis, business model architecture, go-to market strategy, product planning, financial modelling, and fundraising planning. The course structure includes weekly workshops, guest presentations from seasoned entrepreneurs, weekly meetings with the teaching team, and one-on-one support from a dedicated industry mentor. The experience culminates in three pitches to panels of VCs and other industry experts. By the end of the class, successful students will be equipped with the knowledge and network to create impactful business ideas, many of which have been launched from this class. Open to all Stanford students. No prerequisites. For more information, visit the course website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/msande273. Enrolment by application: https://web.stanford.edu/class/msande273/apply.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CEE 251: Negotiation (CEE 151, EARTH 251, PUBLPOL 152)

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Canvas by March 24, 2021. Application can also be accessed at http://bit.ly/Negotiation2021. Synchronous participation required for students who wish to take this class. Note: There is a class fee of $130 for access to case files and readings. If the course fee is of concern, please email the TA at cbh21@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 277S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

CEE 277X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, sociopolitical, organizational, technical, and ethical issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in a developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs, local communities, and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on cultural awareness, ethical implications, user requirements, conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation planning. Admission is by application. Students should plan to enroll in CEE 177S/277S ( ENGR 177B/277B) Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation following successful completion of this course. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service. To satisfy a Ways requirement, students must register for an undergraduate course number ( CEE 177S or ENGR 177A) and this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or `CR' grade satisfies the Ways requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3

CHEM 296: Creating and Leading New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEMENG 196, CHEMENG 296)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CHEM 299: Teaching of Chemistry

Required of all teaching assistants in Chemistry. Techniques of teaching chemistry by means of lectures and labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

CHEMENG 296: Creating and Leading New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEM 296, CHEMENG 196)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CHEMENG 482: The Startup Garage: Design (SOMGEN 282)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

CHEMENG 484: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (SOMGEN 284)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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