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201 - 210 of 286 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

INDE 215: Queer Health & Medicine

Explores specific, pertinent, and timely issues impacting the health of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community; examines the role of the primary care physician in addressing the health care needs of this community. Guest lecturers provide a gender-sensitive approach to the medical care of the LGBT patient, breaking down homophobic barriers and reaffirming patient diversity. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

INDE 273: Medical Improvisation

Medicine, like theater, is both a skill set and an art form. The practice of medicine demands exceptional communicative, cognitive, and interpersonal skills in order to respond to unpredictable situations while interacting with a wide variety of individuals. Improvisational theater skills have a surprising and substantial overlap with those required of clinicians. Improv is a genre of performance art grounded in principles of spontaneity, adaptability, collaboration, and skilled listening. In this course, the principles and training techniques of improvisational theater are used to highlight and improve awareness, communication, and teamwork in the field of medicine. Limited enrollment. Class meets on five consecutive Mondays 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 from 5:30-7:30 pm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

INDE 290A: Walk With Me: A Patient and Family Centered Exploration of Health & The Health Care System

This innovative course for first year students places patients, families, and caregivers front and center in the journey to explore health from a person-centered perspective and better understand the challenges of managing optimal health in a complex health care system. The curriculum is organized around a monthly workshop series, which explores a different health systems science topic each month through lectures from experts from Stanford and the community and from the perspectives of an individual patient or caregiver, or panel, with time to engage in discussion and explore patient-centered solutions to real-world problems. Students are also paired with a patient partner for the year with whom they meet (online) monthly, outside of class, to explore the patient and caregiver journey by developing an individual relationship. Participation in this course can fulfill the ECE requirement. Enrollment by Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by September 11 at 11:59PM: https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bvzt6ZZqAg5Vvkp. Those selected will be informed by September 14 at 11:59PM so that they may enroll in the course. For questions, please email Marcello Chang (TA): marcelkc@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

LAWGEN 112N: Law and Inequality

Most Americans know that discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and religion is unlawful. Seems simple enough. But advertisements in the back of newspapers still announce: "Single White Female Seeks Single White Male?" Isn't that discrimination on the basis of race and sex? Most businesses don't consider men for women's locker room or bathroom attendant. And why aren't those men and women's bathrooms and locker rooms illegal segregation? After all we know what would happened if some business set up separate bathrooms for blacks and whites. Isn't it discrimination for an employer to insist that men wear a jacket and tie and women wear nylons and a skirt? Why are some forms of discrimination unlawful and others not? Why is discrimination against short people, overweight people, or people with annoying personalities not against the law? We will answer these and many other questions by looking at court cases, legal theory, and philosophy. We may also have conversations with guest lectur more »
Most Americans know that discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and religion is unlawful. Seems simple enough. But advertisements in the back of newspapers still announce: "Single White Female Seeks Single White Male?" Isn't that discrimination on the basis of race and sex? Most businesses don't consider men for women's locker room or bathroom attendant. And why aren't those men and women's bathrooms and locker rooms illegal segregation? After all we know what would happened if some business set up separate bathrooms for blacks and whites. Isn't it discrimination for an employer to insist that men wear a jacket and tie and women wear nylons and a skirt? Why are some forms of discrimination unlawful and others not? Why is discrimination against short people, overweight people, or people with annoying personalities not against the law? We will answer these and many other questions by looking at court cases, legal theory, and philosophy. We may also have conversations with guest lecturers who work in civil rights enforcement, and the seminar may include a field trip to visit the offices of civil rights lawyers (lawyers tend to be busy people so these opportunities will depend on their schedules). Class participation and a short final paper are required, but here are no prerequisites other than an open mind and a willingness to delve into unfamiliar material.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Ford, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 236: Tales to Design Cars By

Students learn to tell personal narratives and prototype connections between popular and historic media using the automobile. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and preserved car histories. Storytelling techniques serve to make sense of car experiences through engineering design principles and social learning, Replay memories, examine engagement and understand user interviews, to design for the mobility experience of the future. This course celebrates car fascination, and leads the student through finding and telling a car story through the REVS photographic archives, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and film. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology design thinking, and fine art; applied to car storytelling. Course culminates in a final story presentation and showcase. Restricted to co-term and graduate students. Class Size limited to 18.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)
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