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121 - 130 of 251 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 196F: The Worlds of Labor in Modern India (HISTORY 296L)

This colloquium will introduce students to the exciting and expanding field of Indian labor history and provide them a comprehensive historiographical foundation in this area of historical research. Seminars will engage with one key monograph in the field every week, with selected chapters of the monograph set as compulsory reading. In these seminars, we will explore the world of the working classes and the urban poor in colonial and post-colonial India, as also the Indian labor diaspora. We will understand myriad workplaces such as jute and cotton mills, small workshops, farms and plantations. We will also explore forms of protest and political mobilization devised by workers in their struggles against structures of oppression and in their quest for a life of dignity. Most importantly, these seminars will train students in the methods deployed by labor historians to access the lives of the largely unlettered workers of the region who seldom left a trace of their consciousness in archival documents. Overall, we will connect the debates in the history of labor in modern India to wider discussions about the nature of capitalism, colonial modernity, gender, class, caste and culture.
Last offered: Winter 2022 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 197C: The Structure of Colonial Power: South Asia since the Eighteenth Century (HISTORY 197C)

How did the colonial encounter shape the making of modern South Asia? Was colonial rule a radical rupture from the pre-modern past or did it embody historical continuities? Did colonial rule cause the economic underdevelopment of the region or were regional factors responsible for it? Did colonial forms of knowledge shape how we think of social structures in the Indian subcontinent? Did the colonial census merely register pre-existing Indian communities or did it reshape them? Did colonialism break with patriarchal power or further consolidate it? How did imperial power regulate sexuality in colonial India? What was the relationship between caste power and colonial power? How did capital and labor interact under colonial rule? How did colonialism mediate the very nature of modernity in the region?This lecture-based survey course will explore the nature of the most significant historical process that shaped modern South Asia from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries -- colonialism. It primarily deals with the regions that constituted the directly administered territories of British India, specifically regions that subsequently became the nation-states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
Last offered: Autumn 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ANTHRO 198A: Archaeological Geographic Information Systems (ANTHRO 298A)

This advanced undergraduate and graduate seminar will provide students with practical and theoretical training in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as applied to archaeological research, introducing students to spatial theories and GIS methodological applications to research design and analysis. Topics covered in the course will include: cartographic skills of displaying and visualizing archaeological data, GIS applications to research design and sampling, data acquisition and generation, spatial analyses of artifacts, features, sites, and landscapes, as well as a critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations of GIS spatial analyses and epistemologies. Prerequisites: By instructor consent. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student in this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Kendra, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 201: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites. In addition to class meeting time, a one-hour, once weekly required discussion section will be assigned in the first week of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ANTHRO 203A: Human Osteoarchaeology (ANTHRO 103A, ARCHLGY 103A)

The course will cover the methodological and theoretical backgrounds to human osteoarchaeology, introduce the student to the chemical and physical characteristics of bone, and to the functional morphology of the human skeleton. Classes will consist of a taught component that outlines how osteoarchaeologists reconstruct individual life-histories based on age, sex etc.; this is combined with hands-on identification of different skeletal elements and the markers used to inform the analytical methods. Additional scientific methodologies are also introduced that increasingly form a major component of human osteoarchaeology.
Last offered: Winter 2022

ANTHRO 206A: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ANTHRO 209A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 109A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ANTHRO 210: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 110, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Last offered: Winter 2022

ANTHRO 210B: Examining Ethnographies (ANTHRO 110B)

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Last offered: Autumn 2021
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