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151 - 160 of 187 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGLISH 291: Advanced Creative Nonfiction

English 291 takes as its occasion for your creative and critical development an examination of essays and book excerpts in various creative nonfiction subgenres. These essays and excerpts work within traditional and innovative forms to find new and exciting ways to represent personal experience. This course also serves as the continuing examination and practice of creative nonfiction in English 191. You will write, workshop, present to the class, and revise drafts of work. All workshops will serve as the springboard for larger class conversations about theme and craft. A variety of creative prompts, critical exercises, and assigned readings will foster your understanding and appreciation of creative nonfiction, as well as your growth as a creative writer. All prompts will move you toward a culminating project of realizing either an essay to submit for possible publication or a draft book-length synopsis and outline. This course is designed for students who have completed English 191. Students who have completed creative nonfiction writing course elsewhere or who have extensive other writing workshop experience may petition the instructor for enrollment. Energetic, committed participation is a must.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 293: Literary Translation (COMPLIT 293, DLCL 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 305H: Readings in Close Reading

The difference between reading and reading closely. Is close reading a specific method of literary criticism or theory, or does it describe a sensibility that can accompany any interpretation? Categories and frameworks for this ubiquitous, often undefined critical practice. Different, sometimes competing, traditions of close reading and recent critiques and alternatives. Texts could include Empson, Barthes, Auerbach, T. J. Clark, Adorno, Brooks, de Man, D. A. Miller, Helen Vendler.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Woloch, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 307D: Bringing the Archives to Life

Introduction to the critical skills required for working in the archives. Students will be taught the core methods for working with archival sources, and will be trained in the transcription, editing, interpretation, and publication of primary textual materials. Our textual materials will be generically varied and chronologically diverse, and we shall move from late medieval to contemporary holdings in Stanford University Library¿s Special Collections, in other archives at Stanford, and in local private holdings.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ENGLISH 308: The Civilizing Process

This course considers historical changes in daily life, as practices and everyday ethics as well as ideas and rhetoric, to conceptualize the large-scale meanings of modernity and modernization, from roughly 1600 to the present. Beginning with a series of major thinkers from the mid-20th century Norbert Elias, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu we will assess the compatibility of their accounts of modern changes to domains they call, variously, habitus, interdependence, power, action, work, labor, and life. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to these theories. The second half will consider recent work in literary history, social and cultural history, gender and sexual theory, which has attempted to demarcate and explain a number of revolutions in human practices located in different historical moments and phases of the ongoing modernizing process: an affective revolution, humanitarian revolution, rights revolution, sex-gender and sexual revolutions, towards r more »
This course considers historical changes in daily life, as practices and everyday ethics as well as ideas and rhetoric, to conceptualize the large-scale meanings of modernity and modernization, from roughly 1600 to the present. Beginning with a series of major thinkers from the mid-20th century Norbert Elias, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu we will assess the compatibility of their accounts of modern changes to domains they call, variously, habitus, interdependence, power, action, work, labor, and life. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to these theories. The second half will consider recent work in literary history, social and cultural history, gender and sexual theory, which has attempted to demarcate and explain a number of revolutions in human practices located in different historical moments and phases of the ongoing modernizing process: an affective revolution, humanitarian revolution, rights revolution, sex-gender and sexual revolutions, towards revolutions, too, of practices concerning nonhuman entities and statistical or aggregated visions of humanity. Though oriented to literary-historical knowledge, reading will be heavily historical and social-scientific; students are expected to absorb and respect the disciplinary and methodological canons of various disciplines, and graduate students from outside literature will be welcomed. This course is for graduate students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Greif, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 313: Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 313, TAPS 313)

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 314: Epic and Empire (COMPLIT 320A)

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ENGLISH 316: American Story Cycles

A survey of US literature told through the history of an important, complex, and neglected genre, the short story cycle, ranging from Nathaniel Hawthorne¿s incomplete The Story Teller to Jennifer Egan¿s A Visit From the Goon Squad (2011). Other authors include Sarah Orne Jewett, Charles Chesnutt, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, and Louise Erdrich. An introduction to the patterns of American literary development, its social and cultural contexts, and the major critical/theoretical lenses through which it has been understood. We will consider the unique formal qualities of the story cycle: its liminal status between novel and story collection, its vacillation between unity and multiplicity, connection and disconnection, in relation to broader American questions of identity and community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 318: Pitching and Publishing in Popular Media (DLCL 312, FEMGEN 312F)

Most of the time, writing a pitch for a popular outlet just means writing an email. So why be intimidated? This course will outline the procedure for pitching essays and articles to popular media: how to convince an editor, agent, or anyone else that your idea is compelling, relevant, and deliverable. We'll take a holistic approach to self-presentation that includes presenting yourself with confidence, optimizing your social media and web platform, networking effectively, writing excellent queries and pitches, avoiding the slush pile, and perhaps most importantly, persevering through the inevitable self-doubt and rejection.We will focus on distinguishing the language, topics and hooks of popular media writing from those of academic writing, learn how to target and query editors on shortform pieces (personal essays, news stories, etc.), and explore how humanists can effectively self-advocate and get paid for their work.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Goode, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 318A: Advanced Workshop in Pitching and Publishing for Popular Media (FEMGEN 312G)

Graduate students may self-determine a popular media project¿such as an essay, column/series of essays, podcast, agent query, or book proposal¿to be completed, with consent, under the mentorship of the Graduate Humanities Public Writing Project. Prerequisite: Pitching and Publishing in Popular Media ( DLCL 312/ENG 318/ FEMGEN 312F), approved project proposal. Students will determine their individual meeting schedule with the instructor, and will also convene for at least one group meeting.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1
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