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101 - 110 of 187 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGLISH 168A: Imagining the Oceans

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Primary authors read might include Cook, Equiano, Ricketts, and Steinbeck; Defoe, Cooper, Melville, Conrad, Woolf, Hemingway and Ghosh; Coleridge, Baudelaire, Moore, Bishop and Walcott. Critical readings include Schmitt, Rediker and Linebaugh, Baucom, Best, Corbin, Auden, Sontag and Heller-Roazen. Possible field trips include the Cantor Arts Center and Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 169B: Asian-American Literature and Criticism (ASNAMST 168B)

This course provides a broad overview of twentieth and twenty-first century Asian-American fiction and memoirs as well as the major critical frameworks that have arisen since the emergence of the Asian-American studies as a formal discipline in the 1960s. We'll begin by reading early works such as the Filipino-American writer Carlos Bulosan's 1947 novel America is in the Heart within the context of Cold War America and end with an examination of post-9/11 Asian-American literature, including Ruth Ozeki's A Tale for the Time Being and Qais Akbar Omar's A Fort of Nine Towers. By comparing the experiences of writers from East, Southeast, and Central Asia, we'll aim to arrive at a nuanced understanding of how imperialism, war, immigration, and legal battles have shaped the experiences of Asian-Americans. In addition to our weekly discussions, this seminar will also feature intensive writing tutorials designed to challenge students to produce a work of original scholarship.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Wang, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 169C: Asian American Film and Popular Culture (AMSTUD 115, ASNAMST 115, COMPLIT 159)

Tracing the evolution of Asian American cultural representations from the silent film era through the first generation of Asian American YouTube stars, this course examines the economic, political, and cultural influence of Asian American screen images on U.S. society. Through a focus on both mainstream and independent productions, we discuss the work of Asian American actors, audience members, media producers, consumers, and activists. Possible films and TV shows to be discussed include The Cheat (1915), Shanghai Express (1932), Flower Drum Song (1961), Chan is Missing (1983) Who Killed Vincent Chin? (1989), Sa-I-Gu, (1992), aka Don Bonus (1995), Saving Face (2004), Crazy Rich Asians (2018) TV episodes of the Mindy Project, and work by early Asian American YouTube stars including Michelle Phan, HappySlip, and KevJumba. nn nnStudents will be accepted to the course by application. Please fill out the google form to apply: https://bit.ly/37Cb00d
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 169D: Contemporary Asian American Stories (ASNAMST 169D)

This course will examine the aesthetics and politics of contemporary Asian American storytellers, with an emphasis on work produced within the past five years. We will investigate the pressures historically placed on Asian Americans to tell a certain kind of story¿e.g. the immigrant story in a realist mode¿and the ways writers have found to surprise, question, and innovate, moving beyond those boundaries to explore issues of race, sexuality, science, memory, citizenship, and belonging. Course materials will consist of novels, short stories, graphic narrative, and film, and may include work by Ocean Vuong, Mira Jacobs, Gish Jen, Charles Yu, and Adrian Tomine, as well as Lulu Wang¿s 2019 film The Farewell. This seminar will feature both analytical and creative components, and students will be encouraged to produce both kinds of responses to the material.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Tanaka, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Al-Saber, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 172E: The Literature of the Americas (AMSTUD 142, COMPLIT 142, CSRE 142)

A wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas inncomparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism, the encounters between worldviews of European and indigenous peoples, the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations, slavery, the New World voice, myths of America as paradise or utopia, the coming of modernism, twentieth-century avant-gardes, and distinctive modern episodes--the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres--in unaccustomed conversation with each other.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 177B: Contemporary American Short Stories

An exploration of the power and diversity of the American short story ranging from the 1970s to the present day. By examining short stories historically, critically, and¿above all¿as art objects, students will learn how to read, interpret, critique, and enjoy short stories as social, political, and humanist documents. Students will learn techniques to craft their own short stories and their own critical essays in a course that combines creative practice and the art of critical appreciation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 182E: Photography in Fiction

Since its invention in the early 19th century, photography has found countless documentary and artistic applications. As an art form, it is not only a medium of its own, but one which has entered into fascinating dialogue with other media, from film to dance. Perhaps nowhere has photography been put to such intriguing multimedia use as in fiction. Since the early 20thcentury, authors as diverse as Virginia Woolf, German novelist W.G. Sebald, and the contemporary Sri-Lankan-Canadian writer Michael Ondaatje, have deployed photographs throughout their texts. In this course, we will look at this literary tradition, exploring the way that text and image enter into a complex dance, at times enhancing narrative, at times troubling it. What can we make of these strange and wonderful hybrids? What place do images have in traditional narratives? What are the ethics of such work in an age in which the technological distinction between truth and fiction is becoming ever more blurred? As we read (and look), we will find ourselves not only drawn into the narratives themselves, but sent beyond them, into questions of history, gender, trauma, and memory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 183E: Self-Impersonation: Autobiography, Memoir, Fictional Autobiography (COMPLIT 183)

This course will examine the intersecting genres of fiction, autobiography, and memoir. Topics will include the literary construction of selfhood and its constituent categories; the role of language in the development of the self; the relational nature of the self (vis-à-vis the family, "society," nation, God); the cultural status of "individuality"; conceptions of childhood; and the role of individual testimony in our understanding of family, religious and cultural identity. In addition to short theoretical works, authors may include: Marguerite Duras; Elena Ferrante; Sam Shepard; Gertrude Stein; Karl Ove Knausgaard; Marcel Proust; Vladimir Nabokov; Primo Levi; Roland Barthes; and J. M. Coetzee.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 184C: Data and Knowledge in the Humanities

How do different disciplines understand and use data, and how do skills such as interpretation and critical thought work with data to create knowledge? The introduction of mathematics reshaped disciplines like cosmology and sociology in the past while, in the present, the humanities are facing the same challenges with the emergence of fields such as spatial history and the digital humanities. In this class we will study how the introduction of data has transformed the way that we create knowledge.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
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