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91 - 100 of 339 results for: CSI::certificate

ECON 162: Games Developing Nations Play (POLISCI 247A, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

ECON 165: International Finance

This is a first course in open economy macroeconomics. The course's objective is to build the analytical foundation for understanding key macro issues in the world economy such as global capital flows, the behavior of exchange rates, currency and sovereign debt crises. While a significant portion of the course will be theoretical, there will be several occasions for linking the theory to real-world events. Prerequisite: ECON 52.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 214: Development Economics I

This course uses microeconomic theory and empirical analyses to understand barriers to human and economic development in lower income countries, as well as how public policies are formulated and their effectiveness at alleviating poverty. Topics include institutions and governance; human capital accumulation; productivity; inequality; poverty traps. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Dupas, P. (PI)

ECON 226: U.S. Economic History

The role of economic history as a distinctive approach to the study of economics, using illustrations from U.S. history. Topics include: historical and institutional foundations of the U.S. rise to world economic preeminence; economic causes and consequences of slavery; the American national system of technology; the Great Depression of the 1930s and the policy response; inequality and intergenerational mobility; the growth of social insurance. Intended for graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 241: Public Economics I

Design of tax systems, transfers intended to alleviate poverty, the effect of taxes on earnings, fees intended to internalize externalities like pollution, school finance and other forms of fiscal federalism, local public goods such as schools, policy evaluation with behavioral decision makers. Students will learn to apply sophisticated applications of frontier applied econometric techniques including synthetic controls, regression discontinuity, advanced instrumental variables methods. Prerequisites: ECON 202-204, ECON 210, ECON 270, ECON 271, or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 250: Environmental Economics

Theoretical and empirical analysis of sources of and solutions to environmental problems, with application to local pollution challenges and global environmental issues such as climate change. Topics include: analysis of market failure, choice of environmental policy instruments, integrating environmental and distortionary taxes, environmental policy making under uncertainty, valuing environmental amenities, and measuring /promoting sustainable development.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 341: Public Economics and Environmental Economics Seminar

Issues in measuring and evaluating the economic performance of government tax, expenditure, debt, and regulatory policies; their effects on levels and distribution of income, wealth, and environmental quality; alternative policies and methods of evaluation. Workshop format combines student research, faculty presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ECON 241 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

This service-learning course presents the experience of learning to read and write through the eyes of a child. Participants will learn about theories and pedagogical approaches for teaching beginning reading and will engage in tutoring a child in grades K-3 via Zoom. Participants receive tutor training and learn about relevant research including the role of instruction in developing language and literacy, issues of access and equity, and bilingual literacy instruction. Practical topics include lesson planning and new technologies to address challenges of distance learning. Attendance is expected for online tutoring two times per week in addition to the weekly class meeting. The course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 40 units total)
Instructors: Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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