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31 - 40 of 245 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 14Q: It's the Freakiest Show: David Bowie's Intertextual Imagination

David Bowie's career began in the early 60s with a mix of folk, rock, and psychedelia; he then helped define an era with his performance of a gender bending, glam rock alien prior to engaging with German expressionism and minimalist electronic music; in the `80s, he brought a generation to the dance floor with chart topping hits before turning to drum `n bass and industrial music for inspiration; he finished his life as an enigmatic but engaged artist releasing poignant albums until his death. Through these many transitions, Bowie had a constant ¿ he was a voracious reader ¿ a practice that informed his work throughout his life.n nIn this class students will explore the place of literature in the work of musician, actor, and visual artist David Bowie. They will consider how Bowie's work embodies, questions, critiques, and engages with ¿the literary.¿ This course will focus on the relationship between Bowie's artistic output and work by other artists, both canonical and Avant Garde such more »
David Bowie's career began in the early 60s with a mix of folk, rock, and psychedelia; he then helped define an era with his performance of a gender bending, glam rock alien prior to engaging with German expressionism and minimalist electronic music; in the `80s, he brought a generation to the dance floor with chart topping hits before turning to drum `n bass and industrial music for inspiration; he finished his life as an enigmatic but engaged artist releasing poignant albums until his death. Through these many transitions, Bowie had a constant ¿ he was a voracious reader ¿ a practice that informed his work throughout his life.n nIn this class students will explore the place of literature in the work of musician, actor, and visual artist David Bowie. They will consider how Bowie's work embodies, questions, critiques, and engages with ¿the literary.¿ This course will focus on the relationship between Bowie's artistic output and work by other artists, both canonical and Avant Garde such as Andy Warhol, Iggy Pop, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Elliot, and William Burroughs. It will involve close readings of song lyrics and comparative reading of albums with literary forms such as the novel, poetry, and critical essay. We will also consider how Bowie's music was fueled by and in turn inspires new relationships between music, literature, cinema, and theater.n nThroughout, students will engage with and apply theories of writing, reading, and authorship and will explore questions of time, place, style, gender, and mortality. In addition to written analytical work, students will produce their own creative projects (poem, short story, song, album cover, etc.) in relation to something they find interesting or inspiring in Bowie¿s ouvre. Students will compose in varied modes (speaking, writing, video), in varied situations, and for varied audiences. Doing so, will enable students to explore the interplay between written, oral, and visual forms of communication, learn skills and strategies of oral delivery, and craft messages for both academic and public audiences.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2
Instructors: Naiman, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 15Q: Family Trees: The Intergenerational Novel

The vast majority of novels feature a central protagonist, or a cast of characters whose interactions play out over weeks or months. But some stories overflow our life spans, and cannot be truthfully told without the novelist reaching far back in time. In this Sophomore Seminar, we will consider three novels that seek to tell larger, more ambitious stories that span decades and continents. In the process, we will discuss how novelists build believable worlds, craft memorable characters, keep us engaged as readers, and manage such ambitious projects.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 16Q: Family Stories

This creative writing workshop will explore the idea of family. We¿ll begin with our questions: How do we conceptualize the word family? How do family histories, stories, mythologies, and languages shape our narratives? What does family have to do with the construction of a self? How can we investigate the self and all of its many contexts in writing? We¿ll consider how we might work from our questions in order to craft work that is meaningful and revealing. Students will have the opportunity to write in both poetry and prose, as well as to develop their own creative cross-genre projects. Along the way, we¿ll discuss elements of craft essential to strong writing: how to turn the self into a speaker; how create the world of a piece through image, detail, and metaphor; how to craft beautiful sentences and lines; how to find a form; and many other topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Perham, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 17N: Animal Poems

Animals have always appealed to the human imagination. This course provides basic a rubric for analyzing a variety of animal poems in order (1) to make you better readers of poetry and (2) to examine some of the most pressing philosophical questions that have been raised in the growing field of animal studies. The animals that concern us here are not allegorical¿the serpent as evil, the fox as cunning, the dove as a figure for love. Rather, they are creatures that, in their stubborn animality, provoke the imagination of the poet.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Gigante, D. (PI)

ENGLISH 17Q: Political Poetry

This workshop is devoted to reading and creating politically engaged poetry. Students will look closely at the intersection between activism, identity, and form, focusing on 20th and 21st century poets responding to their sociohistorical moment.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 18Q: Writer's Salon

This course explores from a writer's perspective what it takes to craft a successful novel, short story collection, or book of poetry. You will read three prize-winning books from Bay Area authors, including Creative Writing instructors here at Stanford. Each author will visit our class to talk about their work and the writing process. From week to week, you will complete short writing exercises culminating in a longer story or series of poems that you share with class. For undergrads only.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 19Q: I Bet You Think You're Funny: Humor Writing Workshop

Nothing is harder than being funny on purpose. We often associate humor with lightness, and sometimes that's appropriate, but humor is inextricably interlinked with pain and anger, and our funniest moments often spring from our deepest wounds. Humor can also allow us a platform for rage and indignation when other forms of rhetoric feel inadequate. This workshop will take students through the techniques and aesthetics of humor writing, in a variety of forms, and the main product of the quarter will be to submit for workshop a sustained piece of humor writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Porter, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 21Q: Write Like a Poet: From Tradition to Innovation

In this poetry workshop, we will spend the first half of the quarter reading and writing in traditional forms and the second half innovating from those forms. When discussing poetry, what do we mean when we talk about craft? What is prosody and why is it important? What are the relationships between form and content? What does a modern sonnet look like? We will consider how a writer might honor a tradition without being confined by it. The culmination of the course will be a project in which the student invents (and writes in) a form of their own. All interested students are welcome¿beginners and experts alike.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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