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201 - 210 of 245 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 292: Advanced Poetry Writing

Focus is on generation and discussion of student poems, and seeking published models for the work.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 293: Literary Translation (COMPLIT 293, DLCL 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 300R: Reading for Justice: A collaboration (ENGLISH 2)

The video-taped 8 minute and 46 second murder of George Floyd in May 2020, at the height of the Coronavirus pandemic shutdown in the U.S., lit a match on the tinderbox of racial injustice. The callousness with which the murder was carried out, the calm refusal of the policeman kneeling on Floyd's neck to heed the horrified objections of witnesses at the scene, and an in-the-bones familiarity for too many of us across the country regarding disproportionate police violence against people of color was finally too much to bear. Only the last in a long list of maiming and murders by state authorities of men, women, and children from racialized communities (African American, Latinx, and Native) across the country, Floyd's murder precipitated an anguished outcry for justice by feeling people of all races across the world. Floyd was not the first, and unfortunately, he is not the last, to be so abused. The difference now is that many more of us understand that we have to stand up and demand an more »
The video-taped 8 minute and 46 second murder of George Floyd in May 2020, at the height of the Coronavirus pandemic shutdown in the U.S., lit a match on the tinderbox of racial injustice. The callousness with which the murder was carried out, the calm refusal of the policeman kneeling on Floyd's neck to heed the horrified objections of witnesses at the scene, and an in-the-bones familiarity for too many of us across the country regarding disproportionate police violence against people of color was finally too much to bear. Only the last in a long list of maiming and murders by state authorities of men, women, and children from racialized communities (African American, Latinx, and Native) across the country, Floyd's murder precipitated an anguished outcry for justice by feeling people of all races across the world. Floyd was not the first, and unfortunately, he is not the last, to be so abused. The difference now is that many more of us understand that we have to stand up and demand an end to the injustice. nAmid calls to urgent action in support of racial and gender justice, this reading group/course considers literatures in English specifically through the lens of Reading and Teaching for Justice. The goal of this course is to train readers to attend to the perspectives of those whose lives are often denied, dismissed, disregarded, even as we attend to how and why works of literature that exclude such voices who hail from a variety of equity-seeking groups, both within and without the literary texts selected. Reading for Justice requests that as readers we engage deeply with what justice means for us today, and what it has meant historically.

ENGLISH 302: Early Modern Prose Fictions

The course considers the English and European prose fictions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries--romances, picaresques, pastorals, narratives of social class, and other genres--in the context of Renaissance and present-day theories of fiction. How is narrative form conditioned by social reality, and in turn how does it provide a zone for reflection on that reality in terms different from those of the more codified genres of drama and poetry?
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ENGLISH 305H: Readings in Close Reading

The difference between reading and reading closely. Is close reading a specific method of literary criticism or theory, or does it describe a sensibility that can accompany any interpretation? Categories and frameworks for this ubiquitous, often undefined critical practice. Different, sometimes competing, traditions of close reading and recent critiques and alternatives. Texts could include Empson, Barthes, Auerbach, T. J. Clark, Adorno, Brooks, de Man, D. A. Miller, Helen Vendler.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Woloch, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 307D: Bringing the Archives to Life

Introduction to the critical skills required for working in the archives. Students will be taught the core methods for working with archival sources, and will be trained in the transcription, editing, interpretation, and publication of primary textual materials. Our textual materials will be generically varied and chronologically diverse, and we shall move from late medieval to contemporary holdings in Stanford University Library¿s Special Collections, in other archives at Stanford, and in local private holdings.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ENGLISH 308: The Civilizing Process

This course considers historical changes in daily life, as practices and everyday ethics as well as ideas and rhetoric, to conceptualize the large-scale meanings of modernity and modernization, from roughly 1600 to the present. Beginning with a series of major thinkers from the mid-20th century Norbert Elias, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu we will assess the compatibility of their accounts of modern changes to domains they call, variously, habitus, interdependence, power, action, work, labor, and life. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to these theories. The second half will consider recent work in literary history, social and cultural history, gender and sexual theory, which has attempted to demarcate and explain a number of revolutions in human practices located in different historical moments and phases of the ongoing modernizing process: an affective revolution, humanitarian revolution, rights revolution, sex-gender and sexual revolutions, towards r more »
This course considers historical changes in daily life, as practices and everyday ethics as well as ideas and rhetoric, to conceptualize the large-scale meanings of modernity and modernization, from roughly 1600 to the present. Beginning with a series of major thinkers from the mid-20th century Norbert Elias, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu we will assess the compatibility of their accounts of modern changes to domains they call, variously, habitus, interdependence, power, action, work, labor, and life. The first half of the quarter will be devoted to these theories. The second half will consider recent work in literary history, social and cultural history, gender and sexual theory, which has attempted to demarcate and explain a number of revolutions in human practices located in different historical moments and phases of the ongoing modernizing process: an affective revolution, humanitarian revolution, rights revolution, sex-gender and sexual revolutions, towards revolutions, too, of practices concerning nonhuman entities and statistical or aggregated visions of humanity. Though oriented to literary-historical knowledge, reading will be heavily historical and social-scientific; students are expected to absorb and respect the disciplinary and methodological canons of various disciplines, and graduate students from outside literature will be welcomed. This course is for graduate students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Greif, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 310B: The Riddle of the Author

Even after "the death of the author," the author has proven hard to replace or ignore in literary analysis. The concept remains unsettled but inescapable. This course explores the ways authorship manifests itself within different types of scholarship, ranging from single-author criticism to biography. How do these different modes interpret, and represent, an author? How do they understand the relationship between writer, life and work? Possible authors include Auden, Bishop, Dickens, George Eliot, Ellison, Freud, Hurston, James, Orwell, and Plath.

ENGLISH 313: Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 313, TAPS 313)

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 314: Epic and Empire (COMPLIT 320A)

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
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