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111 - 120 of 245 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 145D: Jewish American Literature and Film (AMSTUD 145D, JEWISHST 155D, REES 145D)

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnati more »
From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 145G: US Fiction 1945 to 2000

Major works of US fiction since World War II, in social, historical, and aesthetic perspective. Ellison, Bellow, O'Connor, Pynchon, Reed, Morrison, Robinson, DeLillo, Gaitskill.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: McGurl, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 145J: The Jewish-American Novel: Diaspora, Privilege, Anxiety, Comedy (AMSTUD 145J, JEWISHST 155J)

Jews are sometimes referred to as 'the people of the book.' Would Portnoy's Complaint count as a book that constitutes Jewish-American peoplehood? What about Fear of Flying? This seminar introduces students to influential Jewish-American novels (and some short stories and film) from the late nineteenth century to the present day. These works return time and again to questions of diaspora, race, queer social belonging, and the duty to a Jewish past, mythical or real. Through close readings of short stories and novels coupled with secondary readings about Jewish-American history and culture, we will explore how American Jewishness is constructed differently in changing historical climates. What makes a text Jewish? What do we mean by Jewish humor and Jewish seriousness? How do Jewish formulations of gender and power respond to Jews' entrance into the white American mainstream? As we read, we'll think through and elaborate on models of ethnicity, privilege, sexuality, and American pluralism. Authors include Cahan, Yezierska, Singer, Roth, Bellow, Malamud, Ozick, Mailer, Jong, and Englander.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

ENGLISH 146C: Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, and Fitzgerald (AMSTUD 146C)

While Hemingway and Fitzgerald were flirting with the expatriate avant-garde in Europe, Hurston and Faulkner were performing anthropological field-work in the local cultures of the American South. Focus on the tremendous diversity of concerns and styles of four writers who marked America's coming-of-age as a literary nation with their multifarious experiments in representing the regional and the global, the racial and the cosmopolitan, the macho and the feminist, the decadent and the impoverished.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 146S: Secret Lives of the Short Story

An exploration of the short story¿s evolution, variety of voices, and formal techniques from its emergence in the 19th century to the present day. We¿ll study a range of American writers, with an aim to uncover the historical, cultural, and stylistic secrets of the Short Story, from both a literary criticism and a creative writing viewpoint.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 150A: The Poetic Memory (ENGLISH 350A)

In this course, we'll read an array of contemporary poetry traversing personal and public history. As we generate original poetry and prose unearthing our personal narratives, we'll consider how poetry and memory intersect, what it means to explore your life and the past through the poetic lens, how autobiography works in books of poetry, and what "the truth" means when writing about life experiences.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENGLISH 150B: Poetry and Desire

A close reading of poems of love, lust, and longing from Sappho to the present. In this seminar, we will consider the erotic impulse as central to lyric, while also understanding poetry as a record of shifting attitudes toward sex and sexuality, love, marriage, and gender. Alongside theories of desire, we will examine the erotic poem¿s relationship with the elegy, the ode, and the political poem. Frequent written assignments, critical and creative, will respond to poems by a range of authors from Shakespeare and Crashaw to Whitman and Cavafy, Lucille Clifton, Louise Glück, and Carl Phillips.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Hofmann, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 150C: Reading and Writing Contemporary Environmental Poetry

In this course, we will learn what it means to write fluidly about oceans and rivers, to write beautifully about mulch, to think creatively about jellyfish, to center the climate catastrophe in verse. Considering the human animal in the fight with and for each other and the Earth, we will explore how the environmental justice movement has been shaped and described by the social justice movement and recent poetic innovations. Through careful reading, critical and creative responses, and both synchronous and asynchronous discussion, we will investigate the changing ways that contemporary environmental poets engage with the greater-than-human world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENGLISH 150G: The Woman Poet of the 21st Century

This class seeks to renew the paradigm of the woman poet: two words that Eavan Boland calls ¿magnetically opposed.¿ What and who is the woman poet in the 21st century? What artifice, myths, forms (such as the domestic poem) have women poets inherited? Students will read poetry by Gwendolyn Brooks, Jos Charles, Layli Long Soldier, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Natasha Trethewey, and others; as well as letters and memoirs. This class is driven by discussion based on students' mapping out the various context and expectations that these poets meet, suggest, or defy. Students should expect to write analytical responses and creative pieces that struggle with the context of the current day.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Lin, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 151H: Wastelands

Have human beings ruined the world? Was it war, or industry, or consumerism, or something else that did it? Beginning with an in-depth exploration of some of the key works of literary modernism, this class will trace the image of the devastated landscape as it develops over the course of the 20th and 21st centuries, arriving finally at literary representations of the contemporary zombie apocalypse. Authors to include T.S Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, Nathanael West, Willa Cather, Cormac McCarthy, and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: McGurl, M. (PI)
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