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161 - 170 of 312 results for: all courses

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

HISTORY 284F: Empires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World Between Europe and China, 1400-1900 (HISTORY 384F)

Focuses on political regimes, transregional connections, economic interactions and sociocultural formations in the early modern Islamic Afro-Eurasia. Topics include complex political-economic systems of the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires and expansion of Turco-Persianate political and literary cultures across the Post-Mongolian Eurasia; experiences of various Muslim, Christian, Jewish and Hindu, as well as urban, rural and nomadic communities and networks under Islamicate political regimes; consolidation of transregional commerce and cultural exchange with the proliferation of networks of merchants, scholars and sufis; new tendencies in knowledge, individual, gender, family, social order, and religion; incorporation of the Islamic world in the global economy; Muslims in the age of revolutions; political and social reforms and consolidation of Muslim internationalism in the age of imperialism.
Last offered: Autumn 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HISTORY 292D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 392D)

( History 292D is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 392D is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 293F: Chinese Politics and Society (HISTORY 393F, SOC 217B, SOC 317B)

(Doctoral students register for 317B.) This seminar examines scholarship on major political developments in the People's Republic of China during its first four decades. The topics to be explored in depth this year include the incorporation of Tibet and Xinjiang into the new Chinese nation-state during the 1950s, political violence during the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s, and the nationwide political upheavals of 1989.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Walder, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 2B: Culture, Evolution, and Society

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity, the origins of social complexity, and the field of demography. Topics will include hominid evolution, population dynamics and the demographic transition, the impact of disease on societies, social theory, and patterns and consequences of inequality. HUMBIO2B, with HUMBIO3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently. Periodically there will be joint module lectures that address related content in the two courses. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors to meet recommended declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 3B: Environmental and Health Policy Analysis

Connections among the life sciences, social sciences, climate science, public health, and public policy. The economic, social, and institutional factors that underlie environmental degradation and challenges facing the health care system including high spending and inequalities in access to health care. Public policies to address these problems. Topics include pollution regulation, climate change policy, health insurance, health care delivery, health care regulation, health disparities, and health care reform. HUMBIO 3B, with HUMBIO 2B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 3A and HUMBIO 3B are designed to be taken concurrently. Periodically there will be joint module lectures that address related content in the two courses. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors to meet recommended declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HUMBIO 4B: Behavior, Health, and Development

Research and theory on human behavior, health, and life span development. How biological factors and cultural practices influence cognition, emotion, motivation, personality, and health in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. HUMBIO 4B, with HUMBIO2B and HUMBIO 3B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 4A and HUMBIO 4B are designed to be taken concurrently. Periodically there will be joint module lectures that address related content in the two courses Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors to meet recommended declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 114: Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease (EARTHSYS 114, EARTHSYS 214, ESS 213)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132, CSRE 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 149L: Longevity (MED 229, PSYCH 102)

Interdisciplinary. Challenges to and solutions for the young from increased human life expectancy: health care, financial markets, families, work, and politics. Guest lectures from engineers, economists, geneticists, and physiologists.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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