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COMM 121: Behavior and Social Media

This course examines behavioral approaches to understanding social media. The course will begin by discussing the design factors that shape behavior online, considering research in human-computer interaction that reflects and reveals communication practices and contexts. Next, the course will examine the psychological aspects of computer-mediated communication and virtual collaboration, including impression formation and management, deception, audience and social networks. Finally, the course will explore the ways in which human behavior is situated inside of social and institutional structures and cultural formations; and with that in mind, it will examine the complex interactions between behavior, society, and information technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 121S: Audience 2.0: Changing Practices and Experiences of Audiencing in the Digital Age

This is an introductory media/cultural studies course that looks at the changing contours of audiencehood in the digital age. Although the term ¿audience¿ seems outmoded in the era of social media, instead of abandoning the term altogether, this course is aimed to expand its definitional boundary and infuse it with new meanings. Starting with a brief historical survey of major theoretical and methodological approaches to studying audiences of popular media and journalism, this course mainly concentrates on approaches associated with cultural studies traditions and their applications to understanding media-audience relationships. The course situates audiencehood in a global and transnational context.nnnTopics will include active audience and their roles in mass media age and digital era; debates about audience¿s power and resistance; fandom and participatory culture; the multifaceted roles of audiences (e.g. fans, activists, ¿produsers¿, laborers etc.); consumerism and commodification; alternative and minority media; emerging journalism practices and corresponding visions of audiences in the digital age; meanings of participation; journalism, affects/emotions and networked publics; the ideal of conversation and filter bubble debates etc.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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