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ARTHIST 405A: Graduate Pedagogy

This course is designed for graduate students in Art History and Film Studies preparing to work as teaching assistants in the Department of Art and Art History. The seminar will focus on a range of theoretical and practical concerns pertaining to the successful conceptualization, organization, and execution of class lectures and discussion sections. Students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives and strategies related to quality teaching at the college level.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Levi, P. (PI)

BIO 290: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical, supervised teaching experience in a biology lab or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation course materials. May be repeated for credit.nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

BIO 291: Development and Teaching of Core Experimental Laboratories

Development and Teaching of Core Experimental LaboratoriesnPreparation for teaching the core experimental lab courses (45 and 47). Emphasis is on practicing the lab, speaking, and writing skills. Taken simultaneously while teaching (for BIO 45) or during the previous quarter (for teaching BIO 47). May be repeated for credit. Meeting times TBD.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Malladi, S. (PI)

BIOHOPK 290H: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical supervised teaching experience in a biology or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation of course materials. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 200A: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship: 200A. Aut; 200B. Win; 200C. Spr
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 200B: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 200C: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHEM 299: Teaching of Chemistry

Required of all teaching assistants in Chemistry. Techniques of teaching chemistry by means of lectures and labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CS 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (EDUC 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Gregg, C. (PI)

CTL 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (ENGR 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 302: The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures

This course is a follow-up to The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages (DLCL 301) and is structured to reflect the needs and challenges of students and teachers embarking on courses at the late second-year level and beyond. Participants will focus on a language and literary area within a chosen foreign language. They will interrogate how literature learning assists further language acquisition and how the level of language knowledge facilitates and impedes literary interpretation and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: DLCL 301.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 303: Language Program Management

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-3
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 230: Learning Experience Design

This course explores the design of tools for learning, leveraging scholarship and real-world projects to create prototypes of new digital learning tools. Students will engage in design activities to come up with prototypes of new learning tools for community partners. This year the course will focus on museums. Designing these tools will require project groups to gather and apply knowledge, evaluating options and synthesizing ideas in order to create an effective (and elegant!) solution. A community-based Cardinal Course. This course is designed to complement EDUC 281, Technology for Learners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 266: Educational Neuroscience

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)
Instructors: ; McCandliss, B. (PI)

EDUC 280: Learning & Teaching of Science (ENGR 295, MED 270, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 230, Learning Experience Design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (CS 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Gregg, C. (PI)

EDUC 366: Learning in Formal and Informal Environments

How learning opportunities are organized in schools and non-school settings including museums, after-school clubs, community art centers, theater groups, aquariums, sports teams, and new media contexts. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework. Readings from empirical journals, web publications, and books.Collaborative written or multimedia research project in which students observe and document a non-school learning environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Barron, B. (PI)

EDUC 377F: Disruptions in Education

(Same as GSBGEN 345). This course will explore the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for investors, entrepreneurs, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education administrators. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the post-secondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors and entrepreneurs. Attendance at first class meeting is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Urstein, R. (PI)

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EDUC 398: Core Mechanics for Learning

In game play, core mechanics refers to the rules of interaction that drive the game forward. This class will consider whether there are core mechanics that can drive learning forward, and if so, how to build them into learning environments. The course mixes basic theory, research methods, and application of learning principles.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Blair, K. (PI)

EFSLANG 692: Speaking and Teaching in English

This course is an opportunity for international students to develop their oral communication and teaching skills to be a course assistant, teaching assistant, or instructor, especially those planning an academic career in an English-speaking context. It focuses on understanding the culture of the classroom and on developing clarity and communicative effectiveness through periodic micro-teaching presentations and role plays simulating typical teaching situations, including short lectures, problem set and review sessions, office hours, discussion leading, and student project consultations. Extensive feedback is provided on comprehensibility and accuracy along with development of interpersonal and intercultural communication skills. The instructor will meet with students regularly throughout the quarter for one-on-one tutorials. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

ENERGY 359: Teaching Experience in Energy Resources Engineering

For TAs in Energy Resources Engineering. Course and lecture design and preparation; lecturing practice in small groups. Classroom teaching practice in an Energy Resources Engineering course for which the participant is the TA (may be in a later quarter). Taught in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 396L: Pedagogy Seminar I

Required for first-year Ph.D students in English. Prerequisite for teaching required for Ph.D. students in English, Modern Thought and Literature and Comparative Literature. Preparation for surviving as teaching assistants in undergraduate literature courses. Focus is on leading discussions and grading papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, MED 270, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

ENGR 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (CTL 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

ENGR 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (EDUC 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 345: Disruptions in Education

Never before has higher education been as severely disrupted as it has in the past year, surfacing novel needs, while at the same putting decades long trends in sharper focus. This course explores the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurs, investors, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education institutions and leaders. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the postsecondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; affordability, student debt, and education financing models; investing in the education space; workforce, skills development, and lifelong learning; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors, entrepreneurs, and social entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Urstein, R. (PI)

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

ME 492: Mechanical Engineering Teaching Assistance Training

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Poggensee, K. (PI)

MED 270: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

MUSIC 280: TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Ellis, G. (PI); Zhu, J. (PI)

PHIL 239: Teaching Methods in Philosophy

For Ph.D. students in their first or second year who are or are about to be teaching assistants for the department. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Turman, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 294: Teaching of Physics Seminar

Weekly seminar/discussions on interactive techniques for teaching physics. Practicum which includes class observations, grading and student teaching in current courses. Required of all Teaching Assistants prior to first teaching assignment. Mandatory attendance at weekly in-class sessions during first 5 weeks of the quarter; mandatory successful completion of all practicum activities. Students who do not hold a US Passport must complete the International Teaching/Course Assistant Screening Exam and be cleared to TA before taking the class. Details: https://language.stanford.edu/programs/efs/languages/english-foreign-students/international-teachingcourse-assistant-screening. Enrollment in PHYSICS 294 is by permission.To get a permission number please complete form: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4OqeEFITqCyW0Pb. If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, MED 270, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

VPTL 280: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, MED 270, PHYSICS 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)
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