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ARTHIST 405A: Graduate Pedagogy Course

This course is designed for graduate students in Art History and Film Studies preparing to work as teaching assistants in the Department of Art and Art History. The seminar will focus on a range of theoretical and practical concerns pertaining to the successful conceptualization, organization, and execution of class lectures and discussion sections. Students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives and strategies related to quality teaching at the college level.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levi, P. (PI)

BIO 290: Teaching of Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 291: Development and Teaching of Core Experimental Laboratories

Preparation for teaching the core experimental courses (44X and 44Y). Emphasis is on lab, speaking, and writing skills. Focus is on updating the lab to meet the changing technical needs of the students. Taken prior to teaching either of the above courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: selection by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Malladi, S. (PI)

BIOHOPK 290H: Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 200A: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship.nn 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hildemann, L. (PI)

CEE 200B: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 200C: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 299: Teaching of Chemistry

Required of all teaching assistants in Chemistry. Techniques of teaching chemistry by means of lectures and labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (EDUC 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 220: Humanities Education

Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 302: The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures

This course is a follow-up to The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages (DLCL 301) and is structured to reflect the needs and challenges of students and teachers embarking on courses at the late second-year level and beyond. Participants will focus on a language and literary area within a chosen foreign language. They will interrogate how literature learning assists further language acquisition and how the level of language knowledge facilitates and impedes literary interpretation and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: DLCL 301.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 303: Language Program Management

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

EARTH 218: Communicating Science

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in teaching science in local schools. Inquiry-based science teaching methods. How to communicate scientific knowledge and improve presentations. Six weeks of supervised teaching in a local school classroom. Prerequisite: course in introductory biology, geology, chemistry, or marine sciences.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 213: Introduction to Teaching

Key concepts in teaching and learning; teacher content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge; student prior knowledge and preconceptions; cognition and metacognition; classroom culture, motivation, and management; teaching diverse populations; comparison of teaching models; analysis of teaching; standards, accountability, and assessment of learning; assessing teaching quality; online learning and teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wischnia, S. (PI)

EDUC 218: Topics in Cognition and Learning: Technology and Multitasking

In our new media ecology, has affinity for social media and multitasking become addictive? Detrimental to learning and well-being? What can we learn from studies in the developmental cognitive sciences and cognitive neurosciences of reward, attention, memory & learning, motivation, stress, and self-regulation for tackling the behavioral design problems we face in crafting better socio-technical systems? This seminar course is designed to engage students in recent advances in this rapidly growing research area via discussions of both historical and late-breaking findings in the literature. By drawing on a breadth of studies ranging from cognitive development, cognitive neuroscience, and educational/training studies, students will gain an appreciation for specific ways interdisciplinary approaches can add value to specific programs of research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McCandliss, B. (PI)

EDUC 239: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 266: Educational Neuroscience

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McCandliss, B. (PI)

EDUC 269: The Ethics in Teaching

Goal is to prepare for the ethical problems teachers confront in their professional lives. Skills of ethical reasoning, familiarity with ethical concepts, and how to apply these skills and concepts in the analysis of case studies. Topics: ethical responsibility in teaching, freedom of speech and academic freedom, equality and difference, indoctrination, and the teaching of values.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

EDUC 280: Learning & Teaching of Science (ENGR 295, PHYSICS 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 230, Learning Experience Design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 290: Instructional Leadership: Building Capacity for Excellent Teaching

This course focuses on the role of leaders in designing, supporting and sustaining excellent teaching. How do leaders create the organizational conditions to focus attention on the technical core of instruction, curriculum and assessment. Course goals: 1) explore a variety of educational leadership approaches, 2) investigate the theory of action underlying these approaches to leadership and consider the implications for instructional practice and 3) develop understanding of the relationship between the leadership approach and the learning environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brazer, S. (PI)

EDUC 297: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (VPTL 297)

(Same as LAW 303) This course is co-taught by Tom Ehrlich, GSE, and Mariatte Denman, Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching & Learning. It provides doctoral and masters students with an opportunity to focus on teaching and learning along with graduate students from many disciplines throughout the university. Students watch and interview master teachers at Stanford, prepare a syllabus module for a workshop or class they might teach, and learn a range of effective pedagogical methods. The course is open not only to masters students and doctoral students from all schools who expect to work in higher education, but also to students interested in K-12 education, and they may develop a teaching module for use in those schools.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (CS 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 303: Designing Learning Spaces

Project-based. How space shapes personal interactions and affords learning opportunities In formal and informal settings. How to integrate learning principles into the design of spaces and develop a rubric to assess the impact on learning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 318: The Discourses of Teaching Reading

Students examine language, social relationships, and students' textual sense-making to further develop their conceptions of reading comprehension and their pedagogical practice as reading teachers. What it means to comprehend text; how classroom discourse matters in the development of textual understanding; and what understandings, purposes, and relationships should matter in classroom talk about text. Field work in which students facilitate small group text discussions for the duration of the quarter at a location of their choice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 319: Research on Teaching

Introduction and historical perspective to theory, methods, and substantive findings of research on teaching.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Borko, H. (PI)

EDUC 328: Topics in Learning and Technology: Core Mechanics for Learning

Contents of the course change each year. The course can be repeated. In game play, core mechanics refers to the rules of interaction that drive the game forward. This class will consider whether there are core mechanics that can drive learning forward, and if so, how to build them into learning environments.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 330: Teaching English Language Learners: Issues in Policy, Leadership, and Instruction

Current perspectives and research on issues facing educators serving the English language learner population. Issues include federal education legislation, civil rights law, national Common Core Standards, content and language proficiency standards assessment and accountability, school improvement models, school structure, community engagement, addressing issues of long-term English learners, programming for newcomer ELLs, early childhood education, and promoting bilingualism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 333A: Understanding Learning Environments

Advanced seminar. Theoretical approaches to learning used to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 338: Innovations in Education

Each year students in this course explore a new design challenge related to teaching. This year we will focus on creating school models. We welcome graduate students from a wide range of disciples. Admission by application. Please see more information at http://dschool.stanford.edu.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 366: Learning in Formal and Informal Environments

How learning opportunities are organized in schools and non-school settings including museums, after-school clubs, community art centers, theater groups, aquariums, sports teams, and new media contexts. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework. Readings from empirical journals, web publications, and books.Collaborative written or multimedia research project in which students observe and document a non-school learning environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barron, B. (PI)

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 405: Teaching the Humanities

This course, designed for graduate students in the humanities and education, explores approaches to teaching the humanities at both the secondary and collegiate levels, with a focus on the teaching of text, and how the humanities can help students develop the ability to read and think critically. The course explores purposes and pedagogical approaches for teaching humanities through a variety of texts and perspectives. The course is designed as an opportunity for doctoral students in the Humanities both to enrich their own teaching, and to broaden their understanding of professional teaching opportunities, including community college and secondary school teaching.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 421: Powerful Ideas for Learning Sciences and Technology Design: Sociocultural Practices of the Blues

This course is intended as a graduate level seminar that provides in-depth readings and discussions, Professor Roy Pea's professional reflections, and student essay-writing on topics examined in Dr. Pea's select publications and associated influential writings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 692: Speaking and Teaching in English

For non-native speakers who must teach in English. Focus is on developing clarity, intelligibility, and effectiveness through weekly presentations simulating actual teaching assistant responsibilities. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 359: Teaching Experience in Energy Resources Engineering

For TAs in Energy Resources Engineering. Course and lecture design and preparation; lecturing practice in small groups. Classroom teaching practice in an Energy Resources Engineering course for which the participant is the TA (may be in a later quarter). Taught in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gerritsen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 396L: Pedagogy Seminar I

Required for first-year Ph.D students in English. Prerequisite for teaching required for Ph.D. students in English, Modern Thought and Literature and Comparative Literature. Preparation for surviving as teaching assistants in undergraduate literature courses. Focus is on leading discussions and grading papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moya, P. (PI)

ENGR 290: Graduate Environment of Support

For course assistants (CAs) and tutors in the School of Engineering tutorial and learning program. Interactive training for effective academic assistance. Pedagogy, developing course material, tutoring, and advising. Sources include video, readings, projects, and role playing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lozano, N. (PI)

ENGR 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (VPTL 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 313: Topics in Engineering and Science Education

This seminar series focuses on topics related to teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses based on education research. Each year focuses on a different topic related to STEM education. This course may be repeated for credit each year. This year we will explore problem-based learning in STEM courses, particularly focusing on design and evaluation of problem-based learning activities. The course will involve in-class discussions, small group activities, and guest lectures. Throughout the quarter, there will be several opportunities for directly practicing and applying STEM education strategies to specific teaching goals in your field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI)

LINGUIST 291: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 191)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 231: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, EDUC 239, ME 139)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 492: Mechanical Engineering Teaching Assistance Training

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MUSIC 280: TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHIL 239: Teaching Methods in Philosophy

For Ph.D. students in their first or second year who are or are about to be teaching assistants for the department. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Madigan, T. (PI)

PHYSICS 294: Teaching of Physics Seminar

Weekly seminar/discussions on interactive techniques for teaching physics. Practicum which includes class observations, grading and student teaching in current courses. Required of all Teaching Assistants prior to first teaching assignment. Mandatory attendance at weekly in-class sessions during first 5 weeks of the quarter; mandatory successful completion of all practicum activities. Enrollment by permission. Apply by December 14th to get a response before class starts. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/dept/physics/academics/TA/PH294Winapp.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 391: Teaching Religious Studies

Workshop/seminar for doctoral students in Religious Studies and adjacent fields designed to cultivate methods for teaching Religious Studies in an academic setting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Penn, M. (PI)

SOC 300: Workshop: The Art and Joy of Teaching

Note: for first-year Sociology Doctoral Students only.nThis class will prepare you for the important roles as undergraduate instructors at Stanford. It rests on the idea that teaching is not only an art that we can all learn, continually improve, and cultivate; teaching can also become a source of great joy and personal meaning during your graduate career, and beyond. You will not only learn how to become an effective instructor in your day-to-day teaching roles (e.g., how to write a compelling syllabus, deliver a powerful lecture, lead an engaging discussion section, build an inclusive classroom, juggle with teaching logistics, make best use of technology, campus resources etc.); you will also discover that teaching is - above all a deeply personal process. While your students will all have different backgrounds, stories and learning styles, we, too, all have different philosophies and ways of teaching. Throughout this class, we will help each other explore what these might be, how we can develop and cultivate them, and, finally, how we can actively employ them to foster learning environments that allow for both academic, as well as personal growth. It is my hope that, at the end of this class, you will embark on your very own educational journeys as teacher-learners who unlock the many great potentials that reside not only in your students, but also in you: plus est en vous! There is more in you (than you think!) With this in mind and the right tools in our hands, we can begin to positively transform our students, while allowing ourselves to be transformed by them at the very same time: this is the art and joy of teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Boch, A. (PI)

VPTL 297: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDUC 297)

(Same as LAW 303) This course is co-taught by Tom Ehrlich, GSE, and Mariatte Denman, Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching & Learning. It provides doctoral and masters students with an opportunity to focus on teaching and learning along with graduate students from many disciplines throughout the university. Students watch and interview master teachers at Stanford, prepare a syllabus module for a workshop or class they might teach, and learn a range of effective pedagogical methods. The course is open not only to masters students and doctoral students from all schools who expect to work in higher education, but also to students interested in K-12 education, and they may develop a teaching module for use in those schools.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

VPTL 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (ENGR 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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