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BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

DLCL 311: Professional Workshop

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Surwillo, L. (PI)

EARTHSYS 277: Interdisciplinary Research Survival Skills (EARTHSYS 177, ENVRINST 177, ENVRINST 277)

Learning in interdisciplinary situations. Framing research questions. Developing research methods that benefit from interdisciplinary understanding. Writing for multiple audiences and effectively making interdisciplinary presentations. Discussions with interdisciplinary experts from across campus regarding interdisciplinary research projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Root, T. (PI)

EDUC 335X: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135X, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 688B: Intensive Academic Writing

For current graduate students. Focus on academic writing, with some work in reading and vocabulary development. Engineering, science, humanities, and social science students prepare a research paper; business students write one or more case studies. Fulfills requirement for EFSLANG 697 or 698A, subject to approval by the EFSLANG Director.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 691: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with videotaping for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693A: Listening Comprehension

Strategies for effective listening in an academic setting, focusing on identifying key ideas in lectures. Practice in understanding words and phrases commonly encountered in classroom settings. Computer-based exercises for comprehension of rapid, natural speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693B: Advanced Listening Comprehension, and Vocabulary Development

Listening strategies and vocabulary for understanding English in academic and non-academic contexts. Discussion and interpretation of communicative intent. Computer-based and video exercises across a range of genres; individual project. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693R: Graduate Reading and Vocabulary Development

Strategies for improving graduate and professional academic reading comprehension and critical analysis. Focus on applying specific techniques for different reading purposes. Expansion of both general and field-specific academic vocabulary and idioms. Includes individual reading projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Geda, K. (PI)

EFSLANG 698C: Writing and Presenting Research

For advanced graduate students completing major research projects. Revising and editing strategies for preparing papers, conference abstracts, and poster presentations. Adapting content and style to different audiences. Students present their research with participant feedback. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 698B and EFSLANG 691 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hubbard, P. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Writing

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, K. (PI)

ENVRINST 277: Interdisciplinary Research Survival Skills (EARTHSYS 177, EARTHSYS 277, ENVRINST 177)

Learning in interdisciplinary situations. Framing research questions. Developing research methods that benefit from interdisciplinary understanding. Writing for multiple audiences and effectively making interdisciplinary presentations. Discussions with interdisciplinary experts from across campus regarding interdisciplinary research projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Root, T. (PI)

ETHICSOC 278M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HRP 214: Scientific Writing

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly. Preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sainani, K. (PI)

HUMSCI 201: Graduate Environment of Support

Psychosocial, financial, and career issues in adapting graduate students to Stanford; how these issues relate to diversity, resources, policies, and procedures. Discussions among faculty, advanced graduate students, campus resource people, and the dean's office. (Thomas)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thomas, A. (PI)

ILAC 309: First Year Writing Workshop

This course enables students to develop the writing skills necessary in their academic careers. Course topics include writing in the discipline, critiques, and literature reviews.May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ORALCOMM 219: Oral Communication for Graduate Students

(Formerly CTL 219.) Graduate student speaking activities such as teaching (delivering lectures, guiding discussion, and facilitating small groups), professional presentations and conference papers, and preparing for oral exams and defenses. In-class projects, discussion, and individual evaluation assist students in developing effective techniques for improving oral communication skills.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Allen, D. (PI)
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