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AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI)

BIO 290: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical, supervised teaching experience in a biology lab or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation course materials. May be repeated for credit.nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 291: Development and Teaching of Core Experimental Laboratories

Preparation for teaching the core experimental courses (44X and 44Y). Emphasis is on lab, speaking, and writing skills. Focus is on updating the lab to meet the changing technical needs of the students. Taken prior to teaching either of the above courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: selection by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Malladi, S. (PI)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOC 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOE 273: Biodesign for Digital Health (MED 273)

Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors including: the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables; simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from wellness, to acute and chronic diseases, to care at the end of life. But how does one approach innovation in digital health to address these health care challenges while ensuring the greatest chance of success? At Stanford Biodesign, we believe that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and, it starts with a need. In Biodesign for Digital Health, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign needs-driven innovation process from over 50 industry experts. Over the course of ten weeks, these speakers join the teaching team in a dynamic classroom environment that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. These experts represent startups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, research labs, health organizations, and more. Student teams will take actual digital and mobile health challenges and learn how to apply Biodesign innovation principles to research and evaluate needs, ideate solutions, and objectively assess them against key criteria for satisfying the needs. Teams take a hands-on approach with the support of need coaches and mentors. On the final day of class, teams present to a panel of digital health experts and compete for project extension funding. Friday section will be used for team projects and for scheduled workshops. Limited enrollment for this course. Students need to submit their application online via: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_28ZWIF8RJsyMvCR
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aalami, O. (PI); Yock, P. (PI)

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 374B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (ME 368B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 376: Startup Garage: Design

A hands-on, project-based course, in which teams identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. This course integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 377: Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

STRAMGT 356/BIOE 376 teams that concluded at the end of fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, may continue with STRAMGT 366/BIOE 377 in winter quarter. Teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model, perform a series of experiments to test key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOHOPK 290H: Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 315H: Career Development for Graduate Students

The course will cover multiple skills required to succeed in graduate school and beyond, including fund raising, publishing, selecting career options, job application and negotiation, and teaching, through lectures, group discussions, and practical excercises.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 200: Foundations in Experimental Biology

This course is divided into two 3-week cycles. During the first cycle, students will be developing a 2-page original research proposal, which may be used for NSF or other fellowship applications. In the second cycle, students will work in small teams and will be mentored by faculty to develop an original research project for oral presentation. Skills emphasized include: 1) reading for breadth and depth; 2) developing compelling, creative arguments; 3) communicating with the spoken and written word; 4) working in teams. Important features of the course include peer assessment, interactive joint classes, and substantial face-to-face discussion with faculty drawn from across the Biosciences programs. Shortened autumn quarter class; class meets during weeks 1 through 8 of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 225: Diversity and Inclusion in Science

Introduction to the social science literature on factors contributing to gender disparities in the scientific workplace (e.g. implicit bias and stereotype threat). Discussions focus on steps that individuals and institutions can take to promote the advancement of women and other underrepresented groups in science, and thus promote the advancement of science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 242: Writing Compelling Fellowships and Career Development Awards

An overview of principles and fundamentals for writing competitive fellowships (e.g. NIH F31, F32) and career development awards (e.g. NIH K Awards). Topics include: developing specific aims and career development plans; using the review criteria to inform writing; timelines and resources. Participants develop proposals through guided exercises with an emphasis on in-class peer review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Botham, C. (PI)

BIOS 263: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Fellowships

Graduate students in the Biosciences PhD Programs develop a fellowship proposal (e.g. NIH F31) focusing on required documents: 1-page specific aims as well as research and career development plans. Students establish a writing practice and learn fundamental grant writing skills through guided exercises, including in-class review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 271: Writing Graduate Research Fellowships

Initial sessions focus on the basics of grantsmanship, review criteria (i.e. intellectual merit and broader impact), and required materials, with particular focus on the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP). Students draft a 2-page research proposal and 3-page personal, relevant background and future goals statement. During small group peer review sessions, students receive detailed feedback to improve the clarity of their writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 279: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Science and Engineering Students

Participants develop proposals in the non-medical fields of science and engineering (e.g. for the National Science Foundation) focusing on required documents such as the 1-page Project Summary, Broader Impacts, Intellectual Merit, and Research Plan. Students establish a writing practice and learn fundamental grant writing skills through guided exercises, including in-class review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOS 281: Career Explorations Opportunities: Transitioning to your Career Choice

The Career Exploration Opportunities (CEO) program highlights the skills necessary to make significant contributions to scientific research, business, policy, communication, and more. This course offers tools and exercises to help late-stage trainees clarify academic and professional priorities. Trainees will be empowered to take charge of their chosen career of choice options through hands-on experiences, which fit their skills, interests, and values.Throughout this course, trainees will receive ongoing support from mentors and employers in their desired field as they develop a job search plan, create tailored resumes/cvs, and cover letters, become more confident in their networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills, and choose the experiential learning options necessary to transition to the next phase of their professional development.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 282: Clarifying Career Choices: Your Self-Reflective Research Project

Using the ADAPT Integrated Development Model, this course will focus on the areas of Development and Awareness. It is designed for students who aspire to gain clarity and insights about themselves their career choices and options. It is designed to encourage self-knowledge and increased awareness of roles and job opportunities inside and outside of academia, where an in-depth Science background is desired. The course requires students to complete up to 3 assessments, short writing assignments, and participate in small group discussions. All students will have the opportunity to have a 1:1 follow-up session with the Instructor to discuss the insights gained from the course as well as opportunities to network with alumni and future employers from various fields.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eberle, S. (PI)

BIOS 289: Preparation & Practice: Biotechnology Business and Finance

This course combines guest lectures with case study and hands-on projects to examine the necessary skills and practical steps necessary to create a business from biotechnology invention. Students will interface with current CEOs, expert practitioners, and investment professionals to gain practical insight into the mechanics and practices of the biotechnology industry, and the variety of roles and responsibilities available to them.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eberle, S. (PI)

BIOS 290: Preparation & Practice: Law

Through tailored lecture, case study and a practical final project, Biosciences and interdisciplinary sciences students and trainees will learn how to apply the skills they acquired in their academic training to a career in Patent Prosecution and related fields. Taught by field and faculty experts, this is your opportunity to network with IP law representatives and to gain hands-on experience in a new career of choice option. Topics include: applying for positions, the importance of IP protection, licensing, overview of the patent process, drafting applications and litigation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 291: Preparation & Practice: Management Consulting

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning about consulting including tools and techniques to gain a consulting mindset. The course requires students to complete short assignments, participate in classroom discussions, and a team project. Students will have the opportunity to understand the consulting process right from sourcing and starting engagements to closure and follow up engagements. Further, with the help of some practical execution in the classroom, students will also learn how to manage client needs and situations, articulating client needs in a succinct proposal, planning and executing consulting assignments, managing client interactions and in the process, learn to leverage some common frameworks for consulting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 292: Preparation & Practice: Science Communication & Media

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry. This course assists students in developing the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field and it provides an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it. Through connections with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations, as well as hands-on experience with the techniques and methodologies most useful on the job market, students will define their own professional goals, increase their awareness of industry terminology and theories, and hone expertise in the areas of: publishing, editing, workflow, ethics, trends, principles of effective scholarly/news writing, interviewing techniques, and media/website management.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 293: Preparation & Practice: Science Policy

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science policy industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it. This course aims to demystify the U.S. science policy process and teach both how policy affects scientific funding and administration, and how science is used to create and influence the creation of law and policy in the U.S. This course will be taught in two parts. The first part outlines the basic structure of the US government, and fundamental issues in US political system, and refreshes students who haven't encountered basic civics since high school, this introductory material will cover the structure of the US government, the governance of key agencies, broad concepts of federalism and shared federal and power, the political party system, and a brief and general modern history of the role of science in policy making. The second part will review four key concepts: 1) who's who and how they work. 2) The policy making process and the role of science in creating policy. 3) Government funding science. 4) Issues, theories and trends in science and policy. This final section will review a variety of cross-cutting issues in science policy development, including innovation theory, the role of uncertainty, and a discussion of the government's role as a developer and repository of science data, and other current topics in the relationship between science and government.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 200A: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship: 200A. Aut; 200B. Win; 200C. Spr
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hildemann, L. (PI)

CEE 200B: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 200C: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hildemann, L. (PI)

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 246: Venture Creation for the Real Economy

CEE 246 is a unique course geared toward developing entrepreneurial businesses (both start-ups and internal ventures). This team, project-based class teaches students how to exploit emerging materials science, engineering and IT technologies to radically apply innovation to the real economy e.g., new products and services that produce real economic value for society as well as for the entrepreneurs. Areas of focus include: Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure, Digital Cities and Communities, Clean Energy, Transportation and Logistics, Advanced Manufacturing, Digital Health Care, and Education. nnWith one-on-one support from seasoned industry mentors and influential guest speakers, the course guides students through the three key elements of new venture creation: identifying opportunities, developing business plans, and determining funding sources. The class culminates with business presentations to industry experts, VCs and other investors. The goal is to equip students with the knowledge and network to create impactful business ideas, many of which have been launched from this class. To apply for this limited enrollment course, students must submit the following application: https://goo.gl/forms/uerr4gcMpIabUDxM2
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 251: Negotiation (CEE 151, EARTH 251, PUBLPOL 152)

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Canvas before March 18. Note: there is a class fee of $130 for access to case files and readings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 275A: California Coast: Science, Policy, and Law (CEE 175A)

This interdisciplinary course integrates the legal, scientific, and policy dimensions of how we characterize and manage resource use and allocation along the California coast. We will use this geographic setting as the vehicle for exploring more generally how agencies, legislatures, and courts resolve resource-use conflicts and the role that scientific information and uncertainty play in the process. Our focus will be on the land-sea interface as we explore contemporary coastal land-use and marine resource decision-making, including coastal pollution, public health, ecosystem management; public access; private development; local community and state infrastructure; natural systems and significant threats; resource extraction; and conservation, mitigation and restoration. Students will learn the fundamental physics, chemistry, and biology of the coastal zone, tools for exploring data collected in the coastal ocean, and the institutional framework that shapes public and private decisions affecting coastal resources. There will be 3 to 4 written assignments addressing policy and science issues during the quarter, as well as a take-home final assignment. Special Instructions: In-class work and discussion is often done in interdisciplinary teams of students from the School of Law, the School of Engineering, the School of Humanities and Sciences, and the School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences. Students are expected to participate in class discussion and field trips. Elements used in grading: Participation, including class session and field trip attendance, writing and quantitative assignments. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE 175A/275A), Earth Systems (EARTHSYS 175/275), and Law (LAW 2510). Open to graduate students and to advanced undergraduates with instructor consent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI); Sivas, D. (PI)

CEE 275S: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 175S)

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of ENGR 177A/277A, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177B/277B Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 296: Creating and Leading New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEMENG 196, CHEMENG 296)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEM 299: Teaching of Chemistry

Required of all teaching assistants in Chemistry. Techniques of teaching chemistry by means of lectures and labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEMENG 296: Creating and Leading New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEM 296, CHEMENG 196)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEMENG 482: The Startup Garage: Design (SOMGEN 282)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHEMENG 484: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (SOMGEN 284)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMM 177D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 277D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brenner, R. (PI)

COMM 208: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 108)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from seema@yasminacademy.com . (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bailenson, J. (PI)

COMM 318: Quantitative Social Science Research Methods

An introduction to a broad range of social science research methods that are widely used in PhD work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 339: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (POLISCI 421K, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

CS 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (EDUC 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gregg, C. (PI)

CS 402: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (EDUC 236)

This course is a practicum in the design of technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. It focuses on the theories, concepts, and practices necessary to design effective, low-cost educational technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. We will explore theories and design frameworks from constructivist and constructionist learning perspectives, as well as the lenses of critical pedagogy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and interaction design for children. The course will concretize theories, concepts, and practices in weekly presentations (including examples) from industry experts with significant backgrounds and proven expertise in designing successful, evidence-based, educational technology products. The Practicum provides the design foundation for EDUC 211 / CS 402 L, a hands-on lab focused on introductory prototyping and the fabrication of incipient interactive, educational technologies. (No prior prototyping experience required.) Interested students must also register for either EDUC 211 or CS 402L, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grant, W. (PI)

CS 402L: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (EDUC 211)

This lab course is a hands-on introduction to the prototyping and fabrication of tangible, interactive technologies, with a special focus on learning and education. (No prior prototyping experience required.) It focuses on the design and prototyping of low-cost technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. You will be introduced to, and learn how to use state-of-the-art fabrication machines (3D printers, laser cutters, Go Go Boards, Sensors, etc.) to design educational toolkits, educational toys, science kits, and tangible user interfaces. The lab builds on the the theoretical and evidence-based foundations explored in the EDUC 236 / CS 402 Practicum. Interested students must also register for either EDUC 236 or CS 402, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grant, W. (PI)

CSRE 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Enrollment limited to 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

DESINST 215: The Design of Data

Our world is increasingly complex and laden with many forms of measurable data. Infographics abound, but whether explicit or not, the stories they tell are all designed. In this hyper-concentrated, hands-on course, students will learn to use mapping and design techniques to sort and synthesize data, unlock insights and communicate information. We will create four different types of maps and infographics and students will practice finding insight from both qualitative and quantitative information. Take this course if you are interested in learning how to navigate through and create for the complicated intersection of data and design.nnAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 240: Designing Machine Learning: A Multidisciplinary Approach

As machine learning makes its way into all kinds of products, systems, spaces, and experiences, we need to train a new generation of creators to harness the potential of machine learning and also to understand its implications. This class invites a mix of designers, data scientists, engineers, business people, and diverse professionals of all backgrounds to help create a multi-disciplinary environment for collaboration. Through a mixture of hands-on guided investigations and design projects, students will learn to design systems of machine learning that create lasting value within their human contexts and environments. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DESINST 270: Visual Design Fundamentals

Introduction to the principles, tools, and techniques of visual design and visual communication. Students learn the fundamentals of line, shape, color, composition, and type and use these basic building blocks to communicate with clarity, emotion, and meaning. Four successive design projects introduce new principles and techniques each week. Projects focus on the digital realm of mobile phones, tablets, websites, and other screen-based interfaces. Students get hands-on experience with both vector and bitmap software packages. No prior experience required. Accepting 24 students. Graduate and undergraduate students encouraged to apply. Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 310: Negotiation by Design: Applied Design Thinking for Negotiators

AN APPLICATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE. PLEASE SUBMIT IT AND WAIT FOR THE ACCEPTANCE NOTICE BEFORE ENROLLING ON AXESS. See https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/negotiation-by-design for more information. nnWhere many stakeholders are working within a complex scenario, the skilled negotiator is comfortable with the inherent ambiguity, at once nimble and careful in responding to new information and changing positions. In this advanced negotiation course, we will crack open some of the fundamental negotiation principles and show you how, where and why design thinking can add unique value to your negotiation skills and outcomes. Mapping and designing the structure and process of your negotiation; understanding tools to gain empathy for the stakeholders involved in the negotiation; learning different styles of negotiation; practicing spontaneity, adaptability and presence in the moment; team brainstorming in preparation, and team dynamics in the execution of a negotiation. You will work through exercises that isolate these skills and then apply them in simulated negotiations, at least one in every class session, to improve your confidence and competence as a negotiator. You and your teammates will then bring them all to bear in a capstone, multi-party, multi-issue negotiation simulation. If you have already taken a basic negotiation course, or have demonstrable experience, we invite you to apply. No previous design thinking experience is required, though certainly useful.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 311: Design Abilities Studio

In this Design Abilities Studio students will learn and practice several applied skills with hands-on activities that vary in length, duration, deliverables, and concept. This course focuses on developing core design abilities that make individuals better design thinkers and creative problem solvers. This class is for students of any discipline. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 302: The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures

This course is a follow-up to The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages (DLCL 301) and is structured to reflect the needs and challenges of students and teachers embarking on courses at the late second-year level and beyond. Participants will focus on a language and literary area within a chosen foreign language. They will interrogate how literature learning assists further language acquisition and how the level of language knowledge facilitates and impedes literary interpretation and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: DLCL 301.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 303: Language Program Management

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bernhardt-Kamil, E. (PI)

DLCL 311: Professional Workshop

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kassabova, B. (PI)

EARTH 200A: Your Professional Development

Navigating the transition from student to professional is a daunting and often times unpredictable journey. This course is designed to help start the process of career planning and development early on. Beginning with navigating career uncertainty, through thoughtful self-assessment, to resume building, the power of negotiation, and managing up - this course builds a solid foundation on which to explore your long-term career goals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yau, A. (PI)

EARTH 200B: Your Personal Development

Success in both your professional and personal life requires emotional, financial, and social intelligence. This course is designed to build on those soft skills that will better prepare you to successfully navigate your life. Develop skills in areas ranging from emotional intelligence, decision making courage, living well under pressure, managing procrastination, conflict resolution, relationship building, influencing, ethics & integrity, and financial literacy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yau, A. (PI)

EARTH 200P: Your Professional Development Practicum

Developing a strong portfolio of skills and tools takes resources and partners. This practicum enables the freedom to explore and develop a specific component of your professional portfolio with instructor support. You will set a professional development goal at the start of the quarter and then build a self-directed set of experiences that engage on-campus resources, professional society opportunities, and/or external partners to explore and develop new skills. Completion will include reflection on the experience, feedback from peers and mentors, and a concrete product that expands your professional ¿toolkit.¿ This practicum is recommended for latter stage graduate students, or following completion of Earth 200A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunbar, R. (PI); Yau, A. (PI)

EARTH 251: Negotiation (CEE 151, CEE 251, PUBLPOL 152)

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Canvas before March 18. Note: there is a class fee of $130 for access to case files and readings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from seema@yasminacademy.com . (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from seema@yasminacademy.com . (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 291: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 191)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in Earth or environmental science and/or policy studies, or in communication or journalism studies with a specific interest in environmental and science communication. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 292: Multimedia Environmental Communication

Introductory theory and practice of effective, accurate and engaging use of photography, audio and video production in communicating environmental science and policy concepts to the public. Emphasis on fundamental techniques, storytelling and workflow more than technical how to or gear. Includes extensive instructor and peer critiquing of work and substantial out-of-class group project work. Limited class size, preference to Earth Systems master's students. No previous multimedia experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

ECON 292: Quantitative Methods for Empirical Research

This is an advanced course on quantitative methods for empirical research. Students are expected to have taken a course in linear models before. In this course I will discuss modern econometric methods for nonlinear models, including maximum likelihood and generalized method of moments. The emphasis will be on how these methods are used in sophisticated empirical work in social sciences. Special topics include discrete choice models and methods for estimating treatment effects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Imbens, G. (PI)

EDUC 200A: Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation

Primarily for master's students in the School of Education. Focus is on reading literature and interpreting descriptive and inferential statistics, especially those commonly found in education. Topics: basic research design, instrument reliability and validity, descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression. All offerings of this course (whether meeting on Mon & Weds or Tues & Thurs) will be taught identically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 200B: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

(Formerly EDUC 151.) Primarily for master's students: An introduction to the core concepts and methods of qualitative research. Through a variety of hands-on learning activities, readings, field experiences, class lectures, and discussions, students will explore the processes and products of qualitative inquiry.nnThis is a graduate level course. No undergraduates may enroll. Priority will be given to GSE students, and final enrollment depends on instructor approval after the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 202I: International Education Policy Workshop (EDUC 102I)

This is a project-based workshop. Practical introduction to issues in educational policy making, education reform, educational planning, implementation of policy interventions, and monitoring and evaluation in developing country contexts. Preference to students enrolled in ICE/IEAPA, but open to other students interested in international development or comparative public policy with instructor's consent. Attendance at first class required for enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 211: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (CS 402L)

This lab course is a hands-on introduction to the prototyping and fabrication of tangible, interactive technologies, with a special focus on learning and education. (No prior prototyping experience required.) It focuses on the design and prototyping of low-cost technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. You will be introduced to, and learn how to use state-of-the-art fabrication machines (3D printers, laser cutters, Go Go Boards, Sensors, etc.) to design educational toolkits, educational toys, science kits, and tangible user interfaces. The lab builds on the the theoretical and evidence-based foundations explored in the EDUC 236 / CS 402 Practicum. Interested students must also register for either EDUC 236 or CS 402, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grant, W. (PI)

EDUC 213: Introduction to Teaching

Key concepts in teaching and learning; teacher content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge; student prior knowledge and preconceptions; cognition and metacognition; classroom culture, motivation, and management; teaching diverse populations; comparison of teaching models; analysis of teaching; standards, accountability, and assessment of learning; assessing teaching quality; online learning and teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wischnia, S. (PI)

EDUC 230: Learning Experience Design

This course explores the design of tools for learning, leveraging scholarship and real-world projects to create prototypes of new digital learning tools. Students will engage in design activities to come up with prototypes of new learning tools for community partners. Designing these tools will require project groups to gather and apply knowledge, evaluating options and synthesizing ideas in order to create an effective (and elegant!) solution. A community-based Cardinal Course. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 281, Technology for Learners
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 236: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (CS 402)

This course is a practicum in the design of technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. It focuses on the theories, concepts, and practices necessary to design effective, low-cost educational technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. We will explore theories and design frameworks from constructivist and constructionist learning perspectives, as well as the lenses of critical pedagogy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and interaction design for children. The course will concretize theories, concepts, and practices in weekly presentations (including examples) from industry experts with significant backgrounds and proven expertise in designing successful, evidence-based, educational technology products. The Practicum provides the design foundation for EDUC 211 / CS 402 L, a hands-on lab focused on introductory prototyping and the fabrication of incipient interactive, educational technologies. (No prior prototyping experience required.) Interested students must also register for either EDUC 211 or CS 402L, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grant, W. (PI)

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

EDUC 260B: Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies (CHPR 266, HRP 292, STATS 266)

Design principles and statistical methods for observational studies. Topics include: matching methods, sensitivity analysis, and instrumental variables. 3 unit registration requires a small project and presentation. Computing is in R. Pre-requisites: HRP 261 and 262 or STATS 209 (HRP 239), or equivalent. See http://rogosateaching.com/somgen290/
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EDUC 266: Educational Neuroscience

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McCandliss, B. (PI)

EDUC 278: Introduction to Issues in Evaluation

Open to master's and doctoral students with priority to students in the School of Education. Focus is on the basic literature and major theoretical and practical issues in the field of program evaluation. Topics include: defining purpose, obtaining credible evidence, the role of the evaluator, working with stakeholder, values in evaluation, utilization, and professional standards. The course project is to design an evaluation for a complex national or international program selected by the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 280: Learning & Teaching of Science (ENGR 295, MED 270, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 230, Learning Experience Design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 287: Graduate Research Workshop on Psychological Interventions (PSYCH 274)

Psychological research has the potential to create novel interventions that promote the public good. This workshop will expose students to psychologically 'wise' intervention research and to support their efforts to conduct such interventions, especially in the context of education, broadly conceived, as well as other areas. The first part of the class will address classic interventions and important topics in intervention research, including effective delivery mechanisms, sensitive behavioral outcomes, the role of theory and psychological process, and considerations of the role of time and of mechanisms that can sustain treatment effects over time. In the second part of the class, students will present and receive feedback on their own ongoing and/or future intervention research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or Education, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, G. (PI)

EDUC 288: Organizational Analysis (SOC 271)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 292: Academic Writing for Clarity and Grace

Students will acquire helpful writing strategies, habits, and critical faculties; increase their sense of writing as revision; and leave them with resources that will support them in their own lifelong pursuit of good writing. Students will work on revising their own papers and editing papers of other students. Class will focus on exercises in a variety of critical writing skills: framing, concision, clarity, emphasis, rhythm, action, actors, argument, data, quotations, and usage. Course enrollment limited to graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jordan, Z. (PI)

EDUC 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (CS 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gregg, C. (PI)

EDUC 326: Advanced Regression Analysis

Social science researchers often deal with complex data and research questions that traditional statistics models like linear regression cannot adequately address. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply two widely used types of advanced regression analysis that allow the examination of 1) multilevel data structures (multilevel models) and 2) multivariate research questions (structural equation models).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, S. (PI)

EDUC 333A: Understanding Learning Environments

Advanced seminar. Theoretical approaches to learning used to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 334B: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Methods

(Same as LAW 660B). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation, or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees of the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI)

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 339: Advanced Topics in Quantitative Policy Analysis

For doctoral students. How to develop a researchable question and research design, identify data sources, construct conceptual frameworks, and interpret empirical results. Presentation by student participants and scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 343C: Preparing for Faculty Careers

For graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from all disciplines who are considering a faculty career of any type and at any of a broad range of institutions. Numbers are limited and so whether formally registered (grad students) or attending as auditors (grad students or postdocs), all participants must commit to attending the entire course. Begins with a methodology to help determine if a faculty career is a good fit for the values, interests and abilities of each participant. Progresses to an exploration of different types of faculty roles and different institutional contexts (e.g., tenure-track vs. non-tenure-track; research-intensive vs. teaching-intensive; large vs. small; etc.). Discusses how to identify and land a faculty position. Ends with concrete tips on how to thrive in such a role. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boothroyd, J. (PI)

EDUC 347: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as GSBGEN 348) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bettinger, E. (PI)

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 375A: Seminar on Organizational Theory (MS&E 389, SOC 363A)

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field. For PhD students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 377B: Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

(Same as STRAMGT 368). This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meehan, B. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Arrillaga, L. (PI)

EDUC 377F: Disruptions in Education

(Same as GSBGEN 345). This course will explore the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for investors, entrepreneurs, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education administrators. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the post-secondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors and entrepreneurs. Attendance at first class meeting is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Urstein, R. (PI)

EDUC 377G: Problem Solving for Social Change

(Also GSBGEN 367). Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's and Mark Wolfson's course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing (GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brest, P. (PI)

EDUC 377H: Diverse Leadership as an Imperative for Impact

(Same as GSBGEN 377). Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership. In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How do race/gender/other identities enter into the equation? How do I develop my own brand of leadership? We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies in education and elsewhere, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will strive for deeper understanding of ourselves and of the context to become a more capable, empathetic and effective leaders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 386: Leadership and Administration in Higher Education

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, G. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI)

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitchell, J. (PI)

EDUC 398: Core Mechanics for Learning

In game play, core mechanics refers to the rules of interaction that drive the game forward. This class will consider whether there are core mechanics that can drive learning forward, and if so, how to build them into learning environments. The course mixes basic theory, research methods, and application of learning principles.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Blair, K. (PI)

EDUC 399A: Designing Surveys

This workshop/course is designed for students who are designing a survey for use in a research project. The workshop content draws on relevant cognitive processing theories and research (on comprehension, retrieval, judgment, and reporting). In addition to some readings and a few lectures, this workshop is designed to be highly interactive and practical. By the end of the course students will have designed and pilot tested their survey instrument. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Porteus, A. (PI)

EDUC 401A: Mini Courses in Methodology: Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS)

Statistical analysis using SPSS, including generating descriptive statistics, drawing graphs, calculating correlation coefficients, conducting t-tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Building up datasets, preparing datasets for analysis, conducting statistical analysis, and interpreting results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lang, D. (PI)

EDUC 401B: Mini Courses in Methodology: Stata

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the Stata statistical software package for use in quantitative research. By the end of the course, students should be able to import and export data, clean and manage data, conduct standard statistical tests (e.g., correlation, t-test, regression), and produce a graph.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 401D: Multilevel Modeling Using R (STATS 196A)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat196/ . Multilevel data analysis examples using R. Topics include: two-level nested data, growth curve modeling, generalized linear models for counts and categorical data, nonlinear models, three-level analyses. Class meets April 8, April 15, April 22, April 29, May 13.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rogosa, D. (PI)

EDUC 421: Powerful Ideas for Learning Sciences and Technology Design: Sociocultural Practices of the Blues

This course is intended as a graduate level seminar that provides in-depth readings and discussions, Professor Roy Pea's professional reflections, and student essay-writing on topics examined in Dr. Pea's select publications and associated influential writings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pea, R. (PI)

EDUC 423: Introduction to Data Science (EDUC 143, SOC 302)

Social scientists can benefit greatly from utilizing new data sources like electronic administration records or digital communications, but they require tools and techniques to make sense of their scope and complexity. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply popular data science techniques regarding data visualization, data reduction and data analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 426: Unleashing Personal Potential: Behavioral Science and Design Thinking Applied to Self (PSYCH 264)

This course facilitates the application of the methods, theories, and findings of behavioral science to students own lives and improvement projects. It does so by combining behavioral science with a design thinking approach. You will learn to identify your potential, navigate to achieve it, and stay resilient during the journey. Students will design their own action plans, define goals and prototype strategies to test them, in an iterative feedback cycle. Our course thus blends two intellectual streams that seldom intersect: behavioral science and design thinking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 430C: Using Data to Describe the World: Descriptive Social Science Research Techniques (SOC 258C)

Course provides hands-on practice in analysis of data from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, including a) instrumental variables estimators; b) regression discontinuity estimators; c) difference-in-difference estimators; d) matching estimators; e) fixed effects estimators; and f) panel data methods (including individual fixed effects models, lagged covariate adjustment models, growth models, etc.). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of EDUC 255B, EDUC 257C, or SOC 257. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 445: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

(Same as STRAMGT 335) In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, G. (PI)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI)

EE 292I: Insanely Great Products: How do they get built?

Great products emerge from a sometimes conflict-laden process of collaboration between different functions within companies. This Seminar seeks to demystify this process via case-studies of successful products and companies. Engineering management and businesspeople will share their experiences in discussion with students. Previous companies profiled: Apple, Intel, Facebook, and Genentech -- to name a few. Previous guests include: Jon Rubinstein (NeXT, Apple, Palm), Diane Greene (VMware), and Ted Hoff (Intel). Pre-requisites: None
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Obershaw, D. (PI)

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EALC 402A, EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2019 is "Edge Computing: Different Directions for Asia and the U.S.?" Distinguished guest speakers discuss Asian and U.S. approaches to 5G network integration, federated learning, computer chips and servers for edge AI processing, and IOT systems built around intelligent clients, such as register-less stores, smart factories, autonomous vehicles, and augmented reality applications. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

EE 402T: Entrepreneurship in Asian High Tech Industries (EALC 402T, EASTASN 402T)

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

EFSLANG 683R: Workshop in Reading and Vocabulary for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English reading skills for academic purposes, including work on comprehension, speed, and critical interpretation, along with strategies for improving vocabulary. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 50-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; QUIJANO, L. (PI)

EFSLANG 683S: Workshop in Oral Communication for International Students

(1-2 units) Provides support in the development of listening and speaking skills in English, including academic listening, small group discussion, oral presentation, and intercultural communication. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 50-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 683W: Workshop in Written Communication for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English writing skills for non-natives. Writing assignments are negotiated with the instructor and may include practice in composition, SAT or TOEFL writing, and writing university application essays and statements of purpose. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 50-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; QUIJANO, L. (PI)

EFSLANG 688: Intensive English and Academic Orientation for Foreign Graduate Students

Goal is to prepare incoming international graduate students for full-time study. Academic orientation and instruction in academic writing, listening, discussion, oral presentation, and spoken usage. Enrollment limited to 14. Course may be repeated once.
Terms: Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 688A: Intensive Spoken English

For current graduate students. Includes work on listening, oral presentation, discussion, and conversational interaction. May fulfill any two of the following EFS requirements, subject to approval by the EFS Director: EFSLANG 690A, 690B, 691, 693B.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 688B: Intensive Academic Writing

For current graduate students. Focus on academic writing, with some work in reading and vocabulary development. Engineering, science, humanities, and social science students prepare a research paper; business students write one or more case studies. Fulfills requirement for EFSLANG 697 or 698A, subject to approval by the EFSLANG Director.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 689B: Building Communication Skills through Improvisation

Focus on building a range of English communication skills through improvisation activities. Participants explore theatrical techniques that teach collaboration, spontaneity, team building, storytelling, and confident public speaking with connections to academic, professional, and personal situations. Course is co-taught by an improvisation expert and an ESL instructor. No previous improvisation or theater experience necessary.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 689P: Pronunciation

The sounds of English, and stress, intonation, and rhythm patterns important to natural-sounding speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 690A: Interacting in English

Strategies for communicating effectively in social and academic settings. Informal and formal language used in campus settings, including starting and maintaining conversations, asking questions, making complaints, and contributing ideas and opinions. Simulations and discussions, with feedback on pronunciation, grammar, and usage. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Geda, K. (PI); Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690C: Advanced Interacting in English

Communication skills for extended discourse such as storytelling and presenting supported arguments. Development of interactive listening facility and overall intelligibility and accuracy. Goal is advanced fluency in classroom, professional and social settings. Identification of and attention to individual patterned errors. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690B or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

EFSLANG 691: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with videotaping for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 691S: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with video recording for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 691.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

EFSLANG 692: Speaking and Teaching in English

For non-native speakers who must teach in English. Focus is on developing clarity, intelligibility, and effectiveness through weekly presentations simulating actual teaching assistant responsibilities. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693A: Listening Comprehension

Strategies for effective listening in an academic setting, focusing on identifying key ideas in lectures. Practice in understanding words and phrases commonly encountered in classroom settings. Computer-based exercises for comprehension of rapid, natural speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lockwood, R. (PI)

EFSLANG 693B: Advanced Listening Comprehension, and Vocabulary Development

Listening strategies and vocabulary for understanding English in academic and non-academic contexts. Discussion and interpretation of communicative intent. Computer-based and video exercises across a range of genres; individual project. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 695A: Pronunciation and Intonation

Recognition and practice of American English sounds, stress, and intonation patterns for greater comprehension and intelligibility. Analysis of problem areas. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. May be repeated once for credit. Enrollment limted to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 695B: Advanced Pronunciation and Intonation

Continuation of EFSLANG 695A, focusing on American English sounds, stress, rhythm, and intonation patterns. Emphasis is on self-monitoring, integrated with short presentations. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 695A.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 697: Gateway to Graduate Writing

Focus is on improving grammatical accuracy and vocabulary, building fluency, and learning the structure and conventions of English correspondence, reports, and short academic papers. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Geda, K. (PI)

EFSLANG 698A: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698B: Advanced Graduate Writing

Focus on clarity, accuracy, and appropriate style. For graduate students experienced in English writing and currently required to write for courses and research. Class meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 698A. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698C: Writing and Presenting Research

For advanced graduate students completing major research projects. Revising and editing strategies for preparing papers, conference abstracts, and poster presentations. Practice adapting written and oral presentational content and style to different audiences. Students present their research and receive instructor and peer feedback, with regular individual tutorials in addition to class work. Enrollment limited to 12. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Students required by the EFS Placement Exam to take EFSLANG 691, 697, 698A, or 698B may not enroll in 698C until those requirements have been fulfilled. Others may sign up directly.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hubbard, P. (PI)

EFSLANG 698S: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work and in producing research papers. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 698A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

ENERGY 203: Stanford Energy Ventures

Solving the global energy challenge will require the creation and successful scale-up of hundreds of new ventures. This project-based course provides a launchpad for the development and creation of transformational energy ventures and innovation models. Interdisciplinary teams will research, analyze, and develop detailed launch plans for high-impact opportunities in the context of the new energy venture development framework offered in this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 359: Teaching Experience in Energy Resources Engineering

For TAs in Energy Resources Engineering. Course and lecture design and preparation; lecturing practice in small groups. Classroom teaching practice in an Energy Resources Engineering course for which the participant is the TA (may be in a later quarter). Taught in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gerritsen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 396L: Pedagogy Seminar I

Required for first-year Ph.D students in English. Prerequisite for teaching required for Ph.D. students in English, Modern Thought and Literature and Comparative Literature. Preparation for surviving as teaching assistants in undergraduate literature courses. Focus is on leading discussions and grading papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moya, P. (PI)

ENGR 103: Public Speaking (ENGR 203)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 202S: Directed Writing Projects

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McDevitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Communication

This course focuses on how to write clear, concise, and organized technical writing. Through interactive presentations, group workshops, and individual conferences, students learn best practices for communicating to academic and professional audiences for a range of purposes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 203: Public Speaking (ENGR 103)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, CSRE 217, ENGR 117, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Enrollment limited to 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 245: The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground

Apply the Lean Startup principles including the Business Model Canvas, Customer Development, and Agile Engineering to prototype, test, and iterate on your idea while discovering if you have a profitable business model. This is the class adopted by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health as the Innovation Corps. Team applications required in December. Proposals can be software, hardware, or service of any kind. Projects are experiential and require incrementally building the product while talking to 10-15 customers/partners each week. See course website http://leanlaunchpad.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: Interest in and passion for exploring whether your technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 248: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 148)

Examines how leaders tackle significant events that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students prepare their minds for the difficult entrepreneurial situations that they will encounter in their lives in whatever their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Previous entrepreneurship coursework or experience preferred. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: http://bit.ly/ENGR148_248_apply2019.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fuchs, J. (PI)

ENGR 277A: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, CEE 277X, ENGR 177A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of ENGR 177A/277A, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177B/277B Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 277B: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, CEE 277S, ENGR 177B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 281: d.media - Designing Media that Matters

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 290: Graduate Environment of Support

For course assistants (CAs) and tutors in the School of Engineering tutorial and learning program. Interactive training for effective academic assistance. Pedagogy, developing course material, tutoring, and advising. Sources include video, readings, projects, and role playing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lozano, N. (PI)

ENGR 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, MED 270, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Graduate seminar series, driven by student interests, with guest speakers from academia and industry. Previous themes have included Finding your North, Becoming Fearless, Daydreams to Reality, and Letters to My Younger Self. Discussion is encouraged as graduate students share experiences and learn with speakers and each other. Possible topics of discussion range from time management and career choices to diversity, health, and family. Several optional informal dinners are hosted after the seminar to continue conversation with the speakers. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheppard, S. (PI)

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

What is it you really want out of the life that your Stanford education is making available to you? Have more questions than answers? Have too many ideas for your career ¿ or not enough? Wondering how to weave together what really fits you, is doable, and will be satisfying and meaningful? nnThis course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. Students gain awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which they want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality.nnThe course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in hands on activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Seminar open to all graduate students (PhD, Masters) and Postdocs in all 7 schools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 311D: Portfolio to Professional: Supporting the Development of Digital Presence Through ePortfolios

This course guides graduate students in creating a professional ePortfolio and establishing an online presence. The course includes seminar-style presentations and discussions, opportunities for feedback with career mentors, classmates, alumni, employers, and other community members using think-aloud protocols and peer review approaches. Curriculum modules focus on strategies for telling your story in the digital environment, platform considerations, evidence and architecture, visual design and user experience. Open to all graduate students and majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chen, H. (PI); Patel, S. (PI)

ENGR 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (VPTL 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 350: Data Impact Lab

In this lab, multi-disciplinary teams of students tackle high-impact, unsolved problems for social sector partners. Teams receive mentorship and coaching from Stanford faculty, domain experts, and data science experts from industry. Sample projects include innovations for: poverty alleviation in the developing world, local government services, education, and healthcare. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (EDUC 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitchell, J. (PI)

ENVRES 380: Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations/Collaborating for the Future (SUST 230)

The capacity to innovate system-level transformations is a crucial leadership modality in the face of complex systemic challenges. This class gives students the mindsets, theoretical framework, and hands-on experience in shaping innovative interventions that bring about scaled and profound transformations in the face of complex multi-factorial challenges. Students are immersed in the System Acupuncture Methodology, which combines systems thinking, strategy, design thinking, behavioral sciences, resilience theory, diffusion theory, decision theory, and a theoretical framework around scaled multi-stakeholder interventions. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create sustainability and resilience on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This project-based team-based class challenges students to find solutions for complex real-world challenges. Class meets in the spring quarter on Fridays 9:30am-4:20pm, weeks 1-9. Lunch will be provided. Final presentations on Friday of week 9, 3-7:30pm. Consent of instructor required. To be considered, please apply on the d.school website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 204: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (GEOLSCI 306, GEOPHYS 205)

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. The class is a series of several minute log stand-and-deliver exercises in which you get immediate class feedback and then re-do it on the fly. In addition, each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as a final project. In addition to the class sessions, I will spend 60-90 min with each student individually. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (Temblor.net, Emeritus USGS). The course syllabus can be found at http://temblor.net/team/ross-stein/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stein, R. (PI)

ETHICSOC 278M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Adams, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, CSRE 217, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Enrollment limited to 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FRENCH 366: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 266, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course must email the professor (jrodin@stanford.edu) by 20 September with a statement of up to 350 words that includes: (a) reasons for wanting to take the class; (b) relevant background in cooking/medieval studies/etc.; (c) stated commitment to attend all ten course meetings; and (d) any dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rodin, J. (PI)

GEOLSCI 306: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (ESS 204, GEOPHYS 205)

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. The class is a series of several minute log stand-and-deliver exercises in which you get immediate class feedback and then re-do it on the fly. In addition, each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as a final project. In addition to the class sessions, I will spend 60-90 min with each student individually. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (Temblor.net, Emeritus USGS). The course syllabus can be found at http://temblor.net/team/ross-stein/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stein, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 205: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (ESS 204, GEOLSCI 306)

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. The class is a series of several minute log stand-and-deliver exercises in which you get immediate class feedback and then re-do it on the fly. In addition, each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as a final project. In addition to the class sessions, I will spend 60-90 min with each student individually. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (Temblor.net, Emeritus USGS). The course syllabus can be found at http://temblor.net/team/ross-stein/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stein, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 310: The Impact of AI on Productivity and Personal Performance

Much has been written about how jobs in firms are likely to change as a result of AI. The first objective of this course is to invite guest speakers from many sectors to address how they think their own jobs or similar jobs are likely to change as AI enters the products they produce (like Netflix products) and the jobs they do. For example, the speakers could be: an engineer in a software firm; a partner in a law firm; a headquarters employee in a big retail firm; or the founder of a new business. The second objective is to bring data to bear on the topic. We ask first, is AI a new technological revolution ¿ like the past revolutions that introduced the steam engine or electrification ¿ that will produce a sustained increase in GDP and productivity? We ask next, when AI or robotics have been introduced in the past twenty years, have these innovations been translated into improvements in individuals¿ productivity and then higher wages? Are the AI innovations in the future likely to have a similar impact? Finally, for you as a student, the goals of this course are to give you a foundation for thinking about the broad consequences of the increasing use of AI, but also to think about how your work life is likely to be different from those who are working today.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Shaw, K. (PI)

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings.This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. In the final team presentation, your challenge is to craft an oral presentation that will persuade your audience to accept your strategic recommendations. By doing this, you will see why ideas, data and advocacy are combined for a professional, persuasive presentation. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important new feature of this course is that a team of external communications coaches work in concert with the professor to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback.In this course you will learn to:- Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational level- Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents- Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style - Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences - Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aidsStudents at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course. Waitlists have been long for this course, and you're encouraged to keep that in mind as you make your course selections. Waitlisted students are encouraged to attend the first two classes.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 319: Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing

The course will be structured around the perspective of a foundation or a high net worth individual who has decided to devote substantial resources to philanthropy and wishes to decide which philanthropic goals to pursue and how best to achieve them. Although there are no formal prerequisites for the course, we will assume that students have experience working at a foundation, nonprofit organization, impact investing fund, or similar organization, or have taken an introductory course in strategic philanthropy such as GSBGEN 381. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's course, Problem Solving for Social Change (GSBGEN 367) , which has a different focus from this one.)
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 345: Disruptions in Education

This course explores the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurs, investors, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education institutions and leaders. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the postsecondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; student debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; workforce, skills development, and lifelong learning; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors, entrepreneurs, and social entrepreneurs.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Urstein, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 352: Winning Writing

This twice-a-week full-quarter workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 368: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 3- unit course is offered to JD law students and other selected graduate students, and to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. There will be ten classes held on Wednesdays beginning January 8th and concluding on March 11th. Each class will begin promptly at 12:30 and end shortly before 3 pm. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. For GSB students, 50% of the final grade will depend on classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment of 3-5 pages. GSB students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The course will be ungraded for medical students, residents and fellows. All students will be expected to complete the written assignment. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 MBA students and (2) a maximum of 20 non-GHB graduate students.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

GSBGEN 370: Power of You: Women in Leadership

All leaders face a host of challenges, but female leaders encounter an additional set of obstacles and considerations-institutional, economic, cultural-that their male counterparts most likely never will. These issues are often exacerbated for women from underrepresented groups. GG370 Power of You: Women and Leadership will prepare students to successfully identify and respond to these challenges, and, ideally, transform them into opportunities for growth and advancement. The course will establish a leadership paradigm that inspires and equips students to create a leadership legacy through empowering others, particularly those who traditionally have not had access to opportunities, networks and/or mentorship. In class and in written weekly reflections, students will deeply explore issues including, but not limited to: the likeability paradox; sexism in the workplace; diversity, inclusivity, and opportunity; intersectional identities; managing voice and reputation; leadership styles; mentorship and sponsorship; and creating social value. Students will create a legacy leadership action plan that will define/refine professional purpose, intentions and dreams/objectives; actions and tactics necessary to achieve student¿s aspirations; risks or barriers that may impede student success; specific indicators of progress towards student¿s goals; and the social change students will work to create. In class, at brown bag lunches, at instructor-hosted on-campus lunches and dinners, and at small lunches and dinners (at the instructor¿s home), students will engage directly with industry leaders including Arianna Huffington (Thrive Global), Meg Whitman (Quibi), Dr. Priscilla Chan (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative), Mary Barra and Alicia Boler-Davis (General Motors), Judy Smith (Smith & Company), Sam Altman (Y-Combinator) and Reid Hoffman (Greylock Ventures and LinkedIn), among others.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Arrillaga, L. (PI)

GSBGEN 377: Diverse Leadership as an Imperative for Impact

Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership.In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How do race/gender/other identities enter into the equation? How do I develop my own brand of leadership? We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies in education and elsewhere, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will strive for deeper understanding of ourselves and of the context to become a more capable, empathetic and effective leaders.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Colby, S. (PI)

GSBGEN 381: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything- time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience- in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and "Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum" will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Arrillaga, L. (PI)

GSBGEN 508: Strategic Pivoting for your Next Chapter

Many students come to the GSB with the intent to pivot upon leaving the institution. Some students feel they have outgrown their position or business, or they feel drawn to a new area that better suits their values and interests, where they can make a greater contribution. Some students have no idea what they want to do after graduating, they just know they want to make a purposeful change. And finally, some students want to strategically change their direction for reputation reasons. The average U.S. employee tenure is only 4-5 years and job roles often change dramatically within that timeframe. Pivoting is an intentional, methodical process for nimbly navigating career changes. A recent Gallup study revealed that almost 90% of workers are either ¿not engaged¿ or ¿actively disengaged¿ from their jobs. A pivot is a change made of your own volition when you have reached a point in your career when you are ready for increased challenge and impact.Strategic Pivoting is a course specifically developed for any student who already plans to pivot in their career and wants to figure out how to successfully build and create their next chapter. In this course we will discuss four stages for how to best pivot: 1) Planting, how to assess and set a strong foundation of values, strengths and interests. 2) Scanning, researching new and related skills, talking to others, and mapping potential opportunities. 3) Piloting, students conduct small, low-risk experiments to test their new direction, as well as gather real-time data and feedback. And 4) Launching, pulling the trigger, fully committed, to your carefully plotted pivot.The ultimate pay-off to Strategic Pivoting is acknowledging and adapting to a rapidly changing society when it comes to career paths. Because our careers are so fundamentally tied to our livelihood and sense of confidence, purpose and meaning, changes can be traumatic without a road map for traversing them. "Navigating this accelerated pace of change and this transitional career state, and learning to embrace it instead of resisting it, can become an edge and advantage." Alex Rodriguez, Major League Baseball icon, ABC/Fox Sports/ESPN commentator, entrepreneur, and CEO of A-Rod Corp will be a featured Guest Speaker in this course. Alex has also had a history of successfully pivoting his career and defying expectations. He is presently getting ready to host his own ESPN interview show called, "Pivot."
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Kluger, A. (PI)

GSBGEN 511: Making Social Ventures Happen by Attracting Financial and Human Capital

Social ventures require leadership, funding, expertise, skills and networks to get off the ground, grow and scale. This course will focus on the key strategies for building and leveraging a network of champions to capitalize a social venture at early-stage, and for sustaining and growing that network as the venture grows. This class is applicable to intrapreneurs, changemakers within major institutions, (private or public), board members, impact investors, those who aspire to be senior leaders within social ventures and social entrepreneurs (founders). Co-led by a practicing venture philanthropist and a social entrepreneur, this interactive, pragmatic course will: - Discuss the critical financial and human capital needs of organizations and companies at different life stages. - Explore the concept of champions and the different types of champions including board chairs, co-founders, mentors, faculty advisors, donors, investors, community evangelists, and fellow entrepreneurs. - Learn about effective networks and how to build them, including the role of communications, relationship-building, and crisis management. - Explore the concept of a powerful vulnerability and the art of "influence without authority" in attracting financial and human capital to the mission and making social ventures happen. Special emphasis will be given to developing co-founders and founding teams, boards and funders/investors as champions. - Develop a roadmap for the ways you will support social ventures throughout your career. - Meet social entrepreneurs and their champions who promote them within various power structures (major corporations, government, the institutional funding community) to learn about the successes and failures of their partnerships. Guest speakers will be posted prior to start of class. - Invite you to join instructors, guest speakers and fellow students for casual dinner on both Wednesdays after class.- Get to know your fellow classmates who share a passion for addressing the world's intractable problems and for creating systemic change.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work.Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery.Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. In this course you will learn to:-Recognize strategically effective communication-Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platforms-Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents-Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication styleAs you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 552: Winning Writing

This two-week, six-session workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; Kramon, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. In its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.The course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; Demarest, D. (PI)

GSBGEN 622: Presentation and Communication Skills for Academics

Academics must effectively communicate the importance of their research to a wide range of audiences, including colleagues, students, stakeholders, and the general public, as well as in a variety of contexts, from academic conferences and job talks to one-on-one conversations, news interviews, and social media. This highly interactive course is designed to equip PhD students with the skills to confidently present their research and connect with varied audiences. Students will craft an elevator pitch for academic settings, create a 3-min TED-like talk aimed at the general public, learn how to document and tell the ¿story¿ of their research, and practice responding to Q&A and research critiques. This class combines best practices from public speaking with elements from related fields, including the art of improv and the science of communication.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: ; McGonigal, K. (PI)

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 306K: World History Pedagogy Workshop

Students draft a syllabus and create a curriculum module for use in a world history lecture course. Corequisite: HISTORY 306D, recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Wigen, K. (PI)

HRP 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 211: Law and Biosciences: Neuroscience

(Same as LAW 3006) Legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in neuroscience, including effects upon law and society through improvements in predicting illnesses and behaviors, reading minds through neuroimaging, understanding responsibility and consciousness, treating criminal behavior, and cognitive enhancement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Greely, H. (PI)

HRP 214: Scientific Writing

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly in preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course. Please note 3-units students will additionally write and revise a manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sainani, K. (PI)

HRP 223: Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS

Provides hands-on introduction to basic data management and analysis techniques using SAS. Data management topics include: Introduction to SAS and SAS syntax, importing data, creating and reading SAS datasets, data cleaning and validation, creating new variables, and combining data sets. Analysis techniques include: basic descriptive statistics (e.g., means, frequency) and bivariate procedures for continuous and categorical variables (e.g., t-tests, chi-squares).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Park, L. (PI); Popat, R. (PI)

HRP 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (MED 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design and develop innovative social ventures addressing key challenges in health and the environment, especially in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). Your mandate in identifying problems and designing solutions is broad and flexible! SE Lab is open to students and fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support you and your team in generating and developing ideas and projects that will change the world! Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bloom, G. (PI)

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI)

HRP 237: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (INTLPOL 290, MED 226)

(Formerly IPS 290) How do you come up with an idea for a useful research project in a low resource setting? How do you develop a research question, prepare a concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, complex cultural situations, and unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aimed at graduate students interested in global health research, though students of all disciplines interested in practical methods for research are welcome. Undergraduates who have completed 85 units or more may enroll with instructor consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI)

HRP 244: Developing Measurement Tools for Health Research

The focus of this course is on providing the skills necessary to develop, validate and administer both qualitative and quantitative measures and instruments. Topics will include creating valid measures, ensuring the measures used address and apply to the research questions, design and samples; determining when to use standardized measures or develop new ones; instrument validation techniques; factor analysis; and survey administration, including determining the most effective way of administering measures (e.g., online, paper-and-pencil, ACASI) and the best way to design the survey.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI)

HRP 264: Foundations of Statistical and Scientific Inference (STATS 264)

The course will consist of readings and discussion of foundational papers and book sections in the domains of statistical and scientific inference. Topics to be covered include philosophy of science, interpretations of probability, Bayesian and frequentist approaches to statistical inference and current controversies about the proper use of p-values and research reproducibility. nnRecommended preparation: At least 2 quarters of biostatistics and one of epidemiology. Intended for second year Masters students, of PhD students with as least 1 year of preceding graduate training.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goodman, S. (PI)

HRP 271: Preparation and Practice: Scientific Communication and Media

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it.nnAnticipated Learning Outcomes ¿nTo assist interdisciplinary graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows in all levels of training to develop and hone the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field;nTo provide an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it;nTo provide a forum for interacting with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations who may assist candidates with defining and meeting their own professional goals;nTo increase awareness of industry terminology and theories, combined with hands-on experience with techniques and methodologies most useful for credential development on the job market;nTo develop and hone expertise in the areas of: publishing, editing, workflow, ethics, trends, principles of effective scholarly/news writing, interviewing techniques, and media/website management.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (MED 285)

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors such as: healthcare/medical innovation, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship health, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers, the course invites the discussion of global problems, perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. Light Dinner will be served. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll - registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 212: Medical Humanities and the Arts

The interdisciplinary field of medical humanities: the use of the arts and humanities to examine medicine in personal, social, and cultural contexts. Topics include the doctor/patient relationship, the patient perspective, the meaning of doctoring, and the meaning of illness. Sources include visual and performing arts, film, and literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and scholarly writing. Designed for medical students in the Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration, but all students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 230: Topics in Scientific Management

Designed for postdocs and advanced graduate students. Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, and writing and securing grants.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 273: Medical Improvisation

Medicine, like theater, is both a skill set and an art form. The practice of medicine demands exceptional communicative, cognitive, and interpersonal skills in order to respond to unpredictable situations while interacting with a wide variety of individuals. Improvisational theater skills have a surprising and substantial overlap with those required of clinicians. Improv is a genre of performance art grounded in principles of spontaneity, adaptability, collaboration, and skilled listening. In this course, the principles and training techniques of improvisational theater are used to highlight and improve awareness, communication, and teamwork in the field of medicine. Limited enrollment. Class meets on five consecutive Mondays 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 from 5:30-7:30 pm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Nevins, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 257: Technology & Public Purpose: Practical Solutions for Innovation's Public Dilemmas

The arc of innovative progress has reached an inflection point. Technological innovation has brought immeasurable benefits to billions through improved health, productivity, and convenience. Yet as recent events have shown, unless we actively manage their risks to society, ranging from privacy concerns, to rogue AI and gene editing, to massive potential job losses, to keeping up with China and others -- new technologies may also bring unforeseen destructive consequences. We will begin with a brief history of successful and unsuccessful governance of far reaching technological changes in the past. We then turn to key technologies and the dilemmas each create, in particular: digital/social media (privacy, truth, and election interference); AI/big data (algorithmic bias, etc); the coming biotech revolution (gene editing, bio weapons); driverless cars and car-less drivers: the future of work; and the role of China and other competitors. This class is designed for advanced students in international and public policy, or any technical discipline. The goal is to have a thoughtful exchange of ideas and you do not need prior expertise in any of these topics. We will have some fantastic guest speakers, and each class will be divided into understanding the problem, and thinking about some solutions. Enrollment will be limited to 20. You will learn to think and write like a policymaker tackling these novel concerns.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Manuel, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 291: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 191)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sumner, M. (PI); Xu, R. (SI)

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 236: Tales to Design Cars By

Students learn to tell personal narratives and prototype connections between popular and historic media using the automobile. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and preserved car histories. Storytelling techniques serve to make sense of car experiences through engineering design principles and social learning, Replay memories, examine engagement and understand user interviews, to design for the mobility experience of the future. This course celebrates car fascination, and leads the student through finding and telling a car story through the REVS photographic archives, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and film. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology design thinking, and fine art; applied to car storytelling. Course culminates in a final story presentation and showcase. Restricted to co-term and graduate students. Class Size limited to 18.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 243: Designing Emotion- for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of mobility experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration. Class size limited to 18.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 301: LaunchPad:Design and Launch your Product or Service

This is an intense course in product design and development offered to graduate students only (no exceptions). In just ten weeks, we will apply principles of design thinking to the real-life challenge of imagining, prototyping, testing and iterating, building, pricing, marketing, distributing and selling your product or service. You will work hard on both sides of your brain. You will experience the joy of success and the (passing) pain of failure along the way. This course is an excellent chance to practice design thinking in a demanding, fast-paced, results-oriented group with support from faculty and industry leaders. This course may change your life. We will treat each team and idea as a real start-up, so the work will be intense. If you do not have a passionate and overwhelming urge to start a business or launch a product or service, this class will not be a fit. Teams must visit office hours in winter quarter (Tuesdays 2:30p-4:00p) in order to be considered for the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 311: Leading Design Teams

This class teaches students how to be an effective design team leader using the construct of a multifunction new product development (NPD) team and conceptually places students as the leader of a NPD team - the Product Manager. Topics include leadership self-awareness, a review of various leadership styles and skills in diagnosing team dynamics. The understanding and motivation of non-design engineering members of an NPD team (i.e., Sales, Marketing, Finance, HR) will be explored. Classroom activity will include interactive discussion of case studies, hands-on practice of skills, simulations, outside speakers and team presentations. Homework will include case study and source material reading, weekly reflection journals and outside research. A summary presentation and abstract-length written report of a leadership exemplar will serve as the final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schar, M. (PI)

ME 368: d.Leadership (MS&E 489)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ME 377: Design Thinking Studio

Design Thinking Studio is an immersive introduction to design thinking. You will engage in the real world with your heart, hands and mind to learn and apply the tools and attitudes of design. The class is project-based and emphasizes adopting new behaviors of work. Fieldwork and collaboration with teammates are required and are a critical component of the class. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 378: Tell, Make, Engage: Action Stories for Entrepreneuring

Individual storytelling action and reflective observations gives the course an evolving framework of evaluative methods, from engineering design; socio cognitive psychology; and art that are formed and reformed by collaborative development within the class. Stories attached to an idea, a discovery or starting up something new, are considered through iterative narrative work, storytelling as rapid prototyping and small group challenges. This course will use qualitative and quantitative methods for story engagement, assessment, and class determined research projects with practice exercises, artifacts, short papers and presentations. Graduate and Co-Term students from all programs welcome. Class size limited to 21.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 492: Mechanical Engineering Teaching Assistance Training

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kaplan, K. (PI)

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI)

MED 270: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 272B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, ME 368B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MGTECON 383: Measuring Impact in Business and Social Enterprise

This class provides students with practical skills for measuring impact in business and social enterprise. How large is the impact of raising prices on sales? Is an advertising campaign working? Does a non-profit actually improve people's lives? Students will finish the course with the ability to design, analyze, and skeptically evaluate experiments that can rigorously answer questions like these. Students will learn: how to evaluate claims of causality; how to conduct and analyze experiments and quasi-experiments; the advantages and disadvantages of experiments; how to quantify uncertainty; and what can go wrong in experiments. Students will acquire a conceptual understanding of basic experimental statistics to inform these skills. Students will also be exposed to how leading companies, researchers, and social innovators strategically deploy experiments. Finally, students will conduct their own experiments on a topic of their choosing in small groups. The class will not assume any prior experience or training with statistics, math or R. However, completing short problem sets and participation in weekly lab sessions will entail acquiring basic knowledge of R.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Broockman, D. (PI)

MKTG 574: Rethinking Purpose

We assume happiness is stable, an endpoint to achieve our goal to chase. It's not. Recent behavioral research suggests that the meaning of happiness changes every 5-10 years, raising the question: how might we build organizations and lives that cultivate happiness? Research suggests it is better to aim for meaning. In Rethinking Purpose, we explore how to rethink purpose in work and life. Students will hear from guests and take a field trip to see how Google has reconsidered purpose. Building on the principles for Solve for X (www.solveforx.com), a platform encouraging moonshot thinking to solve huge problems in the world, we'll harness design thinking principles to create personal moonshots and a path to continue to find those moonshots over the life course. Lastly, we'll map out how to use time in ways that would help build innovative teams, products, and ultimately lives that have positive, meaningful, lasting impact in the world.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: ; Aaker, J. (PI)

MS&E 254: The Ethical Analyst

The ethical responsibility for consequences of professional analysts who use technical knowledge in support of any individual, organization, or government. The means to form ethical judgments; questioning the desirability of physical coercion and deception as a means to reach any end. Human action and relations in society in the light of previous thought, and research on the desired form of social interactions. Attitudes toward ethical dilemmas through an explicit personal code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nesbitt, D. (PI)

MS&E 271: Global Entrepreneurial Marketing

Introduces core marketing concepts to bring a new product or service to market and build for its success. Geared to both entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs alike who have a passion for innovation. Course themes include: Identifying markets and opportunities, defining the offering and customer experience, creating demand, generating revenue, and measuring success. The team-based final focuses on developing a go-to-market strategy based on concepts from the course. Learn about managing self, building culture and teams, strategically think about your contribution as entrepreneur or intrapreuneur to an organization, community or society at large. Highly experiential and project based. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Smith, L. (PI); Woo, V. (PI)

MS&E 273: Technology Venture Formation

Open to graduate students interested in technology driven start-ups. Provides the experience of an early-stage entrepreneur seeking initial investment, including: team building, opportunity assessment, customer development, go-to-market strategy, and IP. Teaching team includes serial entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. Student teams validate the business model using R&D plans and financial projections, and define milestones for raising and using venture capital. Final exam is an investment pitch delivered to a panel of top tier VC partners. In addition to lectures, teams interact with mentors and teaching team weekly. Enrollment by application: http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande273. Recommended: 270, 271, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 274: Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy

Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy: Primarily for graduate students. How entrepreneurial strategy focuses on creating structural change or responding to change induced externally. Grabber-holder dynamics as an analytical framework for developing entrepreneurial strategy to increase success in creating and shaping the diffusion of new technology or product innovation dynamics. Topics: First mover versus follower advantage in an emerging market; latecomer advantage and strategy in a mature market; strategy to break through stagnation; and strategy to turn danger into opportunity. Modeling, case studies, and term project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tse, E. (PI)

MS&E 275: Intelligent Growth in Startups

Explore the foundational and strategic elements needed for startups to be designed for "venture scale" at inception. Themes include controversial and disruptive insights, competitive analysis, network effects, organizational design, and capital deployment. Case studies, expert guests, and experiential learning projects will be used. Primarily for graduate students. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Recommended: basic accounting.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Miura-Ko, R. (PI)

MS&E 276: Entrepreneurial Management and Finance

For graduate students only, with a preference for engineering and science majors. Emphasis on managing high-growth, early-stage enterprises, especially those with innovation-based products and services. Students work in teams to develop skills and approaches necessary to becoming effective entrepreneurial leaders and managers. Topics include assessing risk, understanding business models, analyzing key operational metrics, modeling cash flow and capital requirements, evaluating sources of financing, structuring and negotiating investments, managing organizational culture and incentives, managing the interplay between ownership and growth, and handling adversity and failure. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Prerequisite: basic accounting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Byers, T. (PI); Loy, T. (PI)

MS&E 277: Creativity and Innovation

The goal of this highly experiential course is to help students from across disciplines master the skills required to bring bold ideas to fruition. We use the Invention Cycle framework for fostering creative problem solving, and pretotyping tools to methodically determine which innovations are viable. Workshops, case studies, and team design projects, supported by guest speakers and readings. The philosophy of the course is that every problem is an opportunity for a creative solution; and its mission is to help students hone the skills needed to move effectively from the seeds of inspiration through evaluation of their ideas. Enrollment limited. Admission by application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Seelig, T. (PI)

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they've learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply lean startup principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February, see hacking4defense.stanford.edu. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 472: Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders' Seminar

Learn about entrepreneurship, innovation, culture, startups and strategy from a diverse lineup of accomplished leaders and entrepreneurs in venture capital, technology, education, philanthropy and more. Open to all Stanford students. Required weekly assignment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MS&E 489: d.Leadership (ME 368)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 280: TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

NBIO 227: Understanding Techniques in Neuroscience

Students will learn to select and evaluate multidisciplinary techniques for approaching modern neuroscience questions. A combination of lectures and small group paper discussions will introduce techniques from molecular, genetic, behavioral, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational neuroscience. Students will be expected to complete homework assignments analyzing primary literature and attend optional laboratory demonstrations. Intended for graduate students, postdocs, and staff from any discipline; and for advanced undergraduates in the biosciences, engineering, or medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

OB 513: Beyond Disruption: Entrepreneurial Leadership Within Existing Organizations

Why do large, successful companies often have such difficulty in disrupting themselves (e.g., Kodak, Blockbuster, Borders)? How do you maintain an entrepreneurial edge within an existing enterprise? How do you sustain core businesses while simultaneously adapting to disruptive threats? In this course, students will build the skills to spot threats and opportunities earlier and capture them faster. The course will take a look at some of the most successful ¿creators within corporations¿ and discern why some strategies succeed when others do not. We will explore the framework that some companies have developed to simultaneously compete in their core business while exploring new ones. To do this we will interact with guests from firms like Walmart, Amazon, General Motors, Flex and IBM as well as venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. Our objective is to help students understand in some detail what it takes to help organizations stay ahead of disruptive threats and to avoid problems that often lead companies into decline.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

OB 612: Careers and Organizations

The careers of individuals are shaped by their movement within and between organizations, whether those be established employers or entrepreneurial ventures. Conversely, organizations of all sizes are shaped by the flows of individuals through them as individuals construct careers by pursuing different opportunities. This course will examine sociological and economic theory and research on this mutually constitutive relationship. Possible topics include inequality and attainment processes, internal labor markets, mobility dynamics, individual and organizational learning, ecological influences, gender and racial segregation, discrimination, and entrepreneurship as a career process.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Sorensen, J. (PI)

OB 670: Designing Social Research

This is a course in the design of social research, with a particular emphasis on research field (i.e., non-laboratory) settings. As such, the course is a forum for discussing and developing an understanding of the different strategies social theorists employ to explain social processes, develop theories, and make these theories as believable as possible. In general, these issues will be discussed in the context of sociological research on organizations, but this will not be the exclusive focus of the course. A range of topics will be covered, for example: formulating and motivating research questions; varieties of explanation; experimental and quasi-experimental methods, including natural experiments; counterfactual models; conceptualization and measurement; sampling and case selection; qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is particularly oriented toward developing an appreciation of the tradeoffs of different approaches. It is well suited to Ph.D. students working on qualifying papers and dissertation proposals.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Carroll, G. (PI)

ORALCOMM 215: Voice Workshop (ORALCOMM 115)

Focus is on breath, voice production, expansion of vocal range and stamina, and clarity of articulation. Geared toward public speaking including presentations, lectures, and job talks. May be taken in conjunction with ORALCOMM 117. ORALCOMM 115/215 was previously listed as CTL 115/215.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freeland, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 217: The Art of Effective Speaking (ORALCOMM 117)

The principles and practice of effective oral communication. Through formal and informal speaking activities, students develop skills framing and articulating ideas through speech. Strategies for speaking extemporaneously, preparing and delivering multimedia presentations, formulating persuasive arguments, refining critical clarity of thought, and enhancing general facility and confidence in oral self-expression. ORALCOMM 117/217 was previously listed as CTL 117/217.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freeland, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 219: Oral Communication for Graduate Students

(Formerly CTL 219.) Graduate student speaking activities such as teaching (delivering lectures, guiding discussion, and facilitating small groups), professional presentations and conference papers, and preparing for oral exams and defenses. In-class projects, discussion, and individual evaluation assist students in developing effective techniques for improving oral communication skills.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Allen, D. (PI)

PHIL 239: Teaching Methods in Philosophy

For Ph.D. students in their first or second year who are or are about to be teaching assistants for the department. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Slabon, T. (PI)

PHYSICS 294: Teaching of Physics Seminar

Weekly seminar/discussions on interactive techniques for teaching physics. Practicum which includes class observations, grading and student teaching in current courses. Required of all Teaching Assistants prior to first teaching assignment. Mandatory attendance at weekly in-class sessions during first 5 weeks of the quarter; mandatory successful completion of all practicum activities. Students who do not hold a US Passport must complete the International Teaching/Course Assistant Screening Exam and be cleared to TA before taking the class. Details: https://language.stanford.edu/programs/efs/languages/english-foreign-students/international-teachingcourse-assistant-screening. Enrollment in PHYS 294 is by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/~nanavati/294fall2019.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, MED 270, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

POLECON 342: Finding Spiritual Meaning at Work: Business Exemplars

This course explores the experience of respected business leaders who have been able to integrate their spiritual and business lives successfully. It also provides an explicit opportunity for students to discuss their own intentions to find deep meaning in and through their business careers. Difficulties, struggles and barriers will be examined as well. Readings will include both biographies of specific business people and background materials on the major religious and philosophical traditions represented. A number of the exemplars whose biographical information will be examined, like Jeff Weiner of LinkedIn, will be invited to class -- initially to listen to the class discussion, and then to provide feedback to students, expand on their own biographies and the background resources read in preparation for each class, and respond to questions and answers. This course will help students elucidate how their business careers fit into what ultimately matters most to them and how to build moral courage and long-term commitment to their ideals.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; McLennan, S. (PI)

POLECON 349: The Business World: Moral and Spiritual Inquiry through Literature

This course uses novels and plays as a basis for examining the moral and spiritual aspects of business leadership and of the environment in which business is done. On the one hand literature is used as the basis for examining the character of business people, while on the other hand literature provides illumination of the cultural contexts of values and beliefs within which commercial activities take place in a global economy. The course is organized around the interplay of religious traditions and national identities. Classes are taught in a Socratic, discussion-based style, creating as much of a seminar atmosphere as possible. A two-text method is used, encouraging students to examine their own personal stories with as much care as the stories presented in the literature. This course will be graded on the basis of class participation, weekly reflection papers (1 page), and a final paper. There will be no exam.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; McLennan, S. (PI)

POLISCI 421K: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 231: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, POLISCI 421K)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 252: Statistical Methods for Behavioral and Social Sciences

This course offers an introduction to advanced topics in statistics with the focus of understanding data in the behavioral and social sciences. It is a practical course in which learning statistical concepts and building models in R go hand in hand. The course is organized into three parts: In the first part, we will learn how to visualize, wrangle, and simulate data in R. In the second part, we will cover topics in frequentist statistics (such as multiple regression, logistic regression, and mixed effects models) using the general linear model as an organizing framework. We will learn how to compare models using simulation methods such as bootstrapping and cross-validation. In the third part, we will focus on Bayesian data analysis as an alternative framework for answering statistical questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gerstenberg, T. (PI)

PSYCH 264: Unleashing Personal Potential: Behavioral Science and Design Thinking Applied to Self (EDUC 426)

This course facilitates the application of the methods, theories, and findings of behavioral science to students own lives and improvement projects. It does so by combining behavioral science with a design thinking approach. You will learn to identify your potential, navigate to achieve it, and stay resilient during the journey. Students will design their own action plans, define goals and prototype strategies to test them, in an iterative feedback cycle. Our course thus blends two intellectual streams that seldom intersect: behavioral science and design thinking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 274: Graduate Research Workshop on Psychological Interventions (EDUC 287)

Psychological research has the potential to create novel interventions that promote the public good. This workshop will expose students to psychologically 'wise' intervention research and to support their efforts to conduct such interventions, especially in the context of education, broadly conceived, as well as other areas. The first part of the class will address classic interventions and important topics in intervention research, including effective delivery mechanisms, sensitive behavioral outcomes, the role of theory and psychological process, and considerations of the role of time and of mechanisms that can sustain treatment effects over time. In the second part of the class, students will present and receive feedback on their own ongoing and/or future intervention research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or Education, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, G. (PI)

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PUBLPOL 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (HRP 224, MED 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design and develop innovative social ventures addressing key challenges in health and the environment, especially in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). Your mandate in identifying problems and designing solutions is broad and flexible! SE Lab is open to students and fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support you and your team in generating and developing ideas and projects that will change the world! Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bloom, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 234: Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals (PUBLPOL 134)

( PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234 - 3 credits Ways--ER)n(Same as LAW 7020) The objective of this large seminar-syle course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding and the law can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government, non-profit, and academia. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. There is significant space for personal reflection and forming your own views on a wide range of issues. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. The relationships among ethics and technology, culture, leadership, law, and global risks (inequality, privacy, financial system meltdown, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) will inform discussion. A broad range of international topics might include: designer genetics; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); social media (e.g. Facebook Cambridge Analytica, on-line sex trafficking, monopolies); new devices (e.g. Amazon Alexa in hotel rooms); free speech on University campuses; opioid addiction; AI (from racism to the work challenge and beyond); corporate and financial sector scandals (Theranos, Wells Fargo fraudulent account creation, Volkswagen emissions testing manipulation); new corporate challenges (e.g. Google selling drones to the military and Facebook¿s new Libra crypto currency); and non-profit sector ethics challenges (e.g. NGOs engagement with ISIS and sexual misconduct in humanitarian aid (Oxfam case)). Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities to earn participation credit beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on rigorous analysis, critical thinking and testing ideas in real-world contexts. Please note that this course will require one make-up evening session on a Wednesday or Thursday in lieu of the final class session the first week of June, and two one-hour extensions to Monday class sessions as a make-up for May 11, so the course will end before Memorial Day. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. The course offers credit toward Public Policy core requirements (if taken in combination with PUBLPOL 103E or PUBLPOL 103F), and Science, Technology and Society majors and satisfies the undergraduate Ways of Thinking¿Ethical Reasoning requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Students taking the course for Ways credit and Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC. Students seeking credit for other majors should consult their departments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Liautaud, S. (PI)

PUBLPOL 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, SOC 168, SOC 268)

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. Theme: Labor market integration of refugees, an international outlook. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 391: Teaching Religious Studies

This seminar will help prepare you for your role as a university teacher both at a practical and a theoretical level. We will focus on how to best obtain (and keep) a new academic position. We will thus often work together on ¿nuts and bolts¿ issues such as syllabus design, engaging lectures, lively seminar discussions, positive classroom dynamics, and producing a strong teaching portfolio. We will also explore recent developments in pedagogical theory, cognitive science, and educational psychology that have bearing on effective university level teaching. These will be situated within the specific demands of the religious studies classroom and supplemented by guest speakers who will help us explore how institutional context affects the ways one teaches.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Penn, M. (PI)

SOC 258C: Using Data to Describe the World: Descriptive Social Science Research Techniques (EDUC 430C)

Course provides hands-on practice in analysis of data from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, including a) instrumental variables estimators; b) regression discontinuity estimators; c) difference-in-difference estimators; d) matching estimators; e) fixed effects estimators; and f) panel data methods (including individual fixed effects models, lagged covariate adjustment models, growth models, etc.). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of EDUC 255B, EDUC 257C, or SOC 257. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; reardon, s. (PI)

SOC 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168)

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. Theme: Labor market integration of refugees, an international outlook. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 271: Organizational Analysis (EDUC 288)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 280B: Introduction to Data Analysis (CSRE 180B, SOC 180B)

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jackson, M. (PI)

SOC 300: Workshop: The Art and Joy of Teaching

Note: for first-year Sociology Doctoral Students only.nThis class will prepare you for the important roles as undergraduate instructors at Stanford. It rests on the idea that teaching is not only an art that we can all learn, continually improve, and cultivate; teaching can also become a source of great joy and personal meaning during your graduate career, and beyond. You will not only learn how to become an effective instructor in your day-to-day teaching roles (e.g., how to write a compelling syllabus, deliver a powerful lecture, lead an engaging discussion section, build an inclusive classroom, juggle with teaching logistics, make best use of technology, campus resources etc.); you will also discover that teaching is - above all a deeply personal process. While your students will all have different backgrounds, stories and learning styles, we, too, all have different philosophies and ways of teaching. Throughout this class, we will help each other explore what these might be, how we can develop and cultivate them, and, finally, how we can actively employ them to foster learning environments that allow for both academic, as well as personal growth. It is my hope that, at the end of this class, you will embark on your very own educational journeys as teacher-learners who unlock the many great potentials that reside not only in your students, but also in you: plus est en vous! There is more in you (than you think!) With this in mind and the right tools in our hands, we can begin to positively transform our students, while allowing ourselves to be transformed by them at the very same time: this is the art and joy of teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gleit, R. (PI)

SOC 302: Introduction to Data Science (EDUC 143, EDUC 423)

Social scientists can benefit greatly from utilizing new data sources like electronic administration records or digital communications, but they require tools and techniques to make sense of their scope and complexity. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply popular data science techniques regarding data visualization, data reduction and data analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 312G: Careers and Organizations

The careers of individuals are shaped by their movement within and between organizations, whether those be established employers or entrepreneurial ventures. Conversely, organizations of all sizes are shaped by the flows of individuals through them as individuals construct careers by pursuing different opportunities. This course will examine sociological and economic theory and research on this mutually constitutive relationship. Possible topics include inequality and attainment processes, internal labor markets, mobility dynamics, individual and organizational learning, ecological influences, gender and racial segregation, discrimination, and entrepreneurship as a career process
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sorensen, J. (PI)

SOC 356: Strategy and Organizations

Why are some organizations more competitive than others?  This is one of the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as strategic management.  In this seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen through the lens of organization theory, touching on the four main theoretical approaches that have developed there.nnnMost work in strategic management pays little attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like.  I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and that structure is developed in this course.  Our goal is to help you to identify theoretical perspectives as you try to understand the strategy field.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOMGEN 208: Preparation and Practice: Law

Focus is on everyday activities of patent practitioners (patent agents, patent associates, and patent partners) and applying skills learned in medical, biosciences and physical sciences graduate studies to careers in Patent Law. Topics include: applying for positions, the importance of IP protection, licensing, overview of the patent process, drafting applications and litigation. Seminar lead by leaders from Morrison and Foerster.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 209: Preparation & Practice: Consulting

This course combines guest lectures with case study and hands-on projects to examine the necessary skills and practical steps necessary to provide businesses with strategic advice and facilitate organizational change. Students will interface with expert practitioners to gain practical insight into the mechanics and practices of the consulting field, and the variety of roles and responsibilities available to them. They will also be exposed to key players and business concepts from myriad industries.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 211: Preparation and Practice: Science Policy

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science policy industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it. This course aims to demystify the U.S. science policy process and teach both how policy affects scientific funding and administration, and how science is used to create and influence the creation of law and policy in the U.S. This course will be taught i two parts. The first part, to be completed prior to the first class outlines the basic structure of the US government, and fundamental issues in US political system, and refresh students who haven't encountered basic civics since high school, this introductory material will cover the structure of the US government, the governance of key agencies, broad concepts of federalism and shared federal and power, the political party system, and a brief and general modern history of the role of science in policy making. The short class online class will acquaint students with the structure of law, regulations and other appropriate policy documents. This online class will be available asynchronously two weeks prior to the live course. A faculty member will moderate this course and give feedback to students on short assignments designed to ensure they understand basic concepts and are prepared for the live class. nThe second part, taught over five days in 3-hour in-class sessions, will review four key concepts: 1) who's who and how they work. The structure and function of the executive branch and its control over science-based agencies, and the legislative oversight and budgeting of these agencies. 2) The policy making process. The policy making process, and the role of science in creating policy. This section will include broad overviews of the legislative process, competing political theory, and risk/assessment/risk management models, as well as discussion of the role of scientists as agency employees and officials, and scientists as experts, interested parties and reviewers. 3) Government funding science. the funding of science by government, including the mechanisms, processes and dominant theories of science funding, as well as the practical and political tensions around science funding, and the reporting and accountability standards to which recipients are subject. 4) Issues, theories and trends in science and policy. The ecology of innovation and policy in the US. Sometimes referred to as the emerging "science of science policy". This final section will review a variety of cross-cutting issues in science policy development, including innovation theory, the role of uncertainty, and a discussion of the government's role as a developer and repository of science data, and other current topics in the relationship between science and government.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 223: Introduction to R for data analysis

Introduction to R, an open-source programming language for statistical computing and graphics. Topics include: the basics of the R language and RStudio environment, data inspection and manipulation, graphics for data visualization, and tools for reproducible research. Interactive format combining lecture and hands-on computer lab, with time to work on your own data. Numerous in-class and homework exercises to build effective skills. Examples will be drawn from different areas of biology and medicine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bagley, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face challenges. What confluence of attitudes, values, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include public policy, entrepreneurship and early stage investing, care delivery innovations, and health care system management to improve the value of care. Course faculty and guests will consist of nationally recognized leaders, innovators, and change agents. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead value improvement in health care delivery including medical, MBA, law, and graduate students, as well as undergraduates, postdoctoral candidates, and medical center trainees. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 282: The Startup Garage: Design (CHEMENG 482)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 284: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (CHEMENG 484)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference

Modern statistical concepts and procedures derived from a mathematical framework. Statistical inference, decision theory; point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses; Neyman-Pearson theory. Bayesian analysis; maximum likelihood, large sample theory. Prerequisite: STATS 116.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 202: Data Mining and Analysis

Data mining is used to discover patterns and relationships in data. Emphasis is on large complex data sets such as those in very large databases or through web mining. Topics: decision trees, association rules, clustering, case based methods, and data visualization. Prereqs: Introductory courses in statistics or probability (e.g., Stats 60), linear algebra (e.g., Math 51), and computer programming (e.g., CS 105).
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walther, G. (PI)

STATS 203: Introduction to Regression Models and Analysis of Variance

Modeling and interpretation of observational and experimental data using linear and nonlinear regression methods. Model building and selection methods. Multivariable analysis. Fixed and random effects models. Experimental design. Prerequisites: a post-calculus introductory probability course, e.g. STATS 116. In addition, a co-requisite post-calculus mathematical statistics course, e.g. STATS 200, basic computer programming knowledge, and some familiarity with matrix algebra.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Siegmund, D. (PI)

STATS 203V: Introduction to Regression Models and Analysis of Variance

Modeling and interpretation of observational and experimental data using linear and nonlinear regression methods. Model building and selection methods. Multivariable analysis. Fixed and random effects models. Experimental design. This course is offered remotely only via video segments (MOOC style). TAs will host remote weekly office hours using an online platform such as Zoom. Prerequisites: a post-calculus introductory probability course, e.g. STATS 116. In addition, a co-requisite post-calculus mathematical statistics course, e.g. STATS 200, basic computer programming knowledge, and some familiarity with matrix algebra.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kaluwa Devage, P. (PI)

STATS 204: Sampling

How best to take data and where to sample it. Examples include surveys and sampling from data warehouses. Emphasis is on methods for finite populations. Topics: simple random sampling, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, ratio and regression estimators, two stage sampling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Basse, G. (PI)

STATS 211: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, HRP 206, MED 206)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 290: Computing for Data Science

Programming and computing techniques for the requirements of data science: acquisition and organization of data; visualization, modelling and inference for scientific applications; presentation and interactive communication of results. Emphasis on computing for substantial projects. Software development with emphasis on R, plus other key software tools. Prerequisites: Programming experience including familiarity with R; computing at least at the level of CS 106; statistics at the level of STATS 110 or 141.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STRAMGT 308: Entrepreneurship from Diverse Perspectives

This seminar showcases the diversity of entrepreneurs and the range of entrepreneurial paths they pursue. Thirty-five entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, primarily woman and under-represented minorities, will share their personal and professional journeys, and how each embodies the entrepreneurial mindset. Case studies, readings and videos, will complement in-class discussions with the speakers in exploring the entire entrepreneurial process from finding an idea and forming and building a team, to being an inclusive leader, raising money, assembling a board, and overcoming setbacks and challenges. The class teaches the entrepreneurial mindset, and how everyone can be entrepreneurial in their lives. Teams will work on creating an idea for a company during the quarter.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 340: POWer: Building the Entrepreneurial Mindset from the Perspective of Women

This seminar will showcase women entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. We will explore the challenges and opportunities they encountered in starting and growing their ventures, and the personal and professional choices they have made. The sessions will include cases, readings, videos, panel discussions, role plays and breakout groups with the entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. The class will help you understand and build your entrepreneurial and growth mindset. You will leave the class with an individual roadmap and tools to help you be entrepreneurial throughout your career. Men are encouraged to enroll.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Mandelbaum, F. (PI)

STRAMGT 353: Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures

This course is offered for students who at some time may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by pursuing opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business. The course deals with case situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager rather than the passive investor. Many cases involve visitors, since the premise is that opportunity and action have large idiosyncratic components. Students must assess opportunity and action in light of the perceived capabilities of the individuals and the nature of the environments they face. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. Each section will have a specific focus.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 356: The Startup Garage: Design

Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model. This course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. It integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. The course focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills (using short lectures and in-class exercises) and then applying these skills to specific problems faced by those users identified by the teams. Teams will get out of the building and interact directly with users and advisers to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 368: Strategic Leadership of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Meehan, B. (PI)

STRAMGT 371: Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation

This course focuses on the strategic management of technology-based innovation in the firm. The purpose is to provide students with concepts, frameworks, and experiences that are useful for taking part in the management of innovation processes in both startups and large technology-focused organizations. The course examines how leaders can manage fast-changing technological innovations effectively. Specific topics include: assessing the innovative capabilities of the firm, managing the technical function in a company, navigating the interfaces between functional groups in the development function in the firm, understanding and managing technical entrepreneurs, building technology-based distinctive competencies and competitive advantages, technological leadership versus followership in competitive strategy, institutionalizing innovation, attracting and keeping entrepreneurs.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 381: Leading Strategic Change in the Health Care Industry

In this seminar we will study the structure and dynamics of the U.S. health care industry, especially in the face of ongoing regulatory change, and ways it intersects with the global health care industry. The seminar's aim is to develop participants' ability to create strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring and workable in this highly dynamic environment. The seminar's pedagogy involves informed debate to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants and instructors, as well as the writing and presentation of position papers by small groups of seminar participants on the key dynamics of the industry.In the course of the seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the societal, industry and organizational levels of analysis. After developing a complete picture of the structure of the health care industry and the strategic relationships among the key players ("the strategic landscape"), the seminar will focus on how health care reform and other external forces will affect the strategic opportunities and challenges of four types of players in the strategic landscape: (1) incumbents; (2) entrepreneurial startups; (3) cross-boundary disruptors; and (4) international health care providers. World-class leaders in health care will be brought in to supplement our understanding of each one of these players. Student teams will be formed to focus on one of the four types of players. Each team will prepare a research paper focused on determining how their type of player can take advantage of the regulatory, technological, social, cultural and demographic changes, and who will be the likely winners and why.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 519: Equity By Design: Building Diverse and Inclusive Organizations

This course equips you to create, build and lead equitable organizations. We will learn the power of iD&I - that is, how we can be change agents by involving key stakeholders, casting the right vision, and constructing the right interactions to unlock the true potential of diversity in teams and organizations. We will discuss the power of inclusion as itrelates to the employee and customer experience. We will study effective strategies for designing diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers and myths related to meritocracy. We'll look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience - from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. We'll dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging. Finally, we will learn tools and techniques to empower change for ourselves and others. Experts in diversity and inclusion, and executives at companies that have successfully incorporated inclusion programs, will join us for the class discussions.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 547: Riding The Next Wave in Developing Economies

Today, innovative ventures in developing economies are providing compelling new products and services to a growing middle-class as well as to the lower part of the economic pyramid. These offerings provide consumers ways to better their lives and companies to grow their businesses. As older industries around the world are being disrupted, and entrepreneurial ecosystems in developing economies are evolving, entrepreneurs and investors now have reference points and "basecamps" to explore unique opportunities. These newly formed networks that include universities, incubators, accelerator programs, angel investor organizations and small venture capital firms are still lacking in breadth and depth, despite their attempts to follow the lead of Silicon Valley. Consequently, investors and founders face distinct and more numerous challenges that they would not encounter in Silicon Valley, such as small local markets, lack of scale-up funding, uncertain exit opportunities, inadequate talent pools and complex legal and political environments.Yet these developing economies are growing and becoming more connected. We are witnessing new technology-based products in these locations allowing problems to be solved at a scale never seen before. AI and machine learning, blockchain, smart sensors, IoT devices, natural language interfaces and AR and VR are just a few of the technologies not only being developed in Silicon Valley, but all over the world. Of course, smartphones, with their multi-faceted sensors, are now becoming ubiquitous. These trends present opportunities such as: replicating business models proven elsewhere; leapfrogging legacy technologies; targeting the base of the pyramid; and starting venture capital firms. Despite this fertile ground for new endeavors, success not only requires an exceptional product/market fit but great execution to start and scale a venture in problematic and sometimes adverse environments.This case-driven course is designed to help students identify new opportunities in developing economies around the world and across industries and to expose them to the challenges they will face. It is targeted at students who are thinking about creating, joining or investing in new ventures in developing economies.The cases and guests will reveal entrepreneurial challenges through the eyes of founders and investors who have seized these opportunities at different stages of the venture: ideation, launch and scaling. This course is designed to showcase innovative companies in high growth industries such as consumer internet, financial services, health care and education. It will feature the latest trends and opportunities in Asia, Eastern Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America. By taking this course, you will be better equipped to observe, explain and participate in developing economy ecosystems and the opportunities and challenges they present.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 573: Moore's Law and the Convergence of Computing and Communications; Strategic Thinking in Action

This six-session (2-unit) Bass seminar focuses on strategic leadership and builds on core strategic leadership coursework in the MBA program. The course uses the seminar format with expectations of extensive contributions from all students to the discussion in each session. Through seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the industry and organizational levels of analysis in dynamic environments. The seminar's aim is to improve participants¿ ability to develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring and workable. The seminar¿s conceptual frameworks include traditional tools of strategic and competitive analysis from the core MBA course on strategic leadership, conceptual frameworks developed by the instructors that help understand the role of strategy-making in the evolution and transformation of organizations and industries, and theoretical frameworks that help understand the interplays between technology strategy and corporate strategy. Three of the six session will feature discussions with senior executives from key industry players. The seminar's pedagogy involves informed debate including with the guest executives to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants as well as the writing and presentation of position papers by small groups of seminar participants concerning the seminar¿s analytical topics.In this fall's seminar we will examine the evolution of the global semiconductor industry in light of the ongoing impact of Moore's Law and the convergence of computing and wireless communications industries, and how it has been and will be affected by strategic actions of entrepreneurial startups, incumbent corporations, and governments in multiple geographies.Several interrelated topics will be discussed as they impact three key industry segments of the global semiconductor industry that are the focus of the seminar.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 574: Strategic Thinking in Action - In Business and Beyond (II)

This six-session Bass seminar is about strategic leadership driving the transformation of the advanced automotive industry. It will build on what students have learned in their MBA core strategic leadership course but will also provide additional conceptual frameworks developed by the instructors to help examine the major seminar topics. The seminar¿s pedagogy involves informed debate to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants. Consequently, there will be an expectation of extensive contributions from all students to the discussion in all of the sessions. Small groups of seminar participants will also be expected to write and present position papers concerning the seminar¿s analytical topics. The industry scope of the seminar is twofold: First, it is about autonomous, electric, and shared vehicles. And second, it is about the manufacturer and supplier incumbents as well as the tech industry and startup new-entrants. In the course of the seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the societal, industry and organizational levels of our analysis.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who led Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Bannick, M. (PI)

SUST 261: Art and Science of Decision Making

Common-sense rules and decision-making tools to achieve clarity of action for important decisions, from personal choices to organizational decisions about business strategies and public policies. The art of qualitative framing and structuring as well as the science of quantitative modeling and analysis. The essential focus, discipline, and passion needed to make high-quality decisions, and thereby increase the probability of desired outcomes. Effective normative techniques and efficient management processes for both analyzing complex decisions and implementing them in the face of an uncertain future world. Lecture topics include practical ways to: interact collaboratively with stakeholders, craft an inspirational vision, create viable alternatives, assess unbiased probabilistic information, clarify tangible and intangible preferences, develop appropriate risk/reward and portfolio models, evaluate strategies and policies across a realistic range of uncertain scenarios, analyze key sensitivities, appraise the value of gathering additional information, and build widespread commitment to implementation plans. Student teams present insights from their analyses of real decisions currently being made by business, nonprofit, and government organizations. Case studies about: energy economics, mine remediation, ocean resource preservation, bison brucellosis, nuclear waste storage, hurricane seeding, electric power production, environmental risk management, venture capital investments, and oil & gas options trading.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Robinson, B. (PI)

VPTL 280: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, MED 270, PHYSICS 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

VPTL 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (ENGR 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

WELLNESS 110: The Science of Motivation and Procrastination

Examine the factors that increase motivation and decrease procrastination from a scientific point of view. Investigate research and models of motivation and procrastination in task engagement arising from the fields of psychology, behavioral economics, and cognitive neuroscience. Cultivate and apply cognitive, behavioral, and social tools that enhance motivation and decrease procrastination while supporting balanced and healthy achievement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walters, M. (PI)

WELLNESS 111: Exploring Happiness

Explores how research-based happiness theory and principles are applied to enhance daily and life satisfaction. Positions happiness as a cornerstone construct of personal wellness, purpose, and fulfillment. Investigates the science of happiness through lecture, guided practice, dialogue, and course material in order to enhance understanding and implementation.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

WELLNESS 114: Emotional Intelligence: Enhancing Your Effectiveness and Balance

Examine the science and practice of emotional intelligence and how it increases effectiveness and balance. Utilize leading frameworks and tools for enhancing emotional and social intelligence, including the understanding, managing, perceiving, and use of emotions. Blends lecture with experiential learning to develop theoretical and practical knowledge resulting in enhanced intra- and interpersonal skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyer Tapia, S. (PI)

WELLNESS 115: Why Decisions are Difficult: Making Wise Choices from Love to Lunch

Examine why making decisions can be difficult and how making wiser decisions enhances satisfaction, happiness, and life success. Investigate practical decision-making frameworks and skills while building awareness around common decision-making fallacies and pitfalls. Develop skills in topic areas ranging from mindfulness, emotional intelligence, cognitive reframing, self-compassion, empathy, gratitude, and courage. Focus on making wiser decisions, big and small, short-term and long-term.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yisrael, D. (PI)

WELLNESS 116: Resilience: How to Bounce Back

Examine the science and practice of resilience. Investigate the emerging field of resilience studies and learn the frameworks and skills that allow people to bounce back more quickly and effectively from life challenges. Topics include mindset and cognitive appraisal, emotional and affect management, central nervous system and vagal system regulation, and perspectives on creating resilient social systems. Harness insights in service rising above life adversity and thriving, even in the midst of tough times.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyer Tapia, S. (PI)

WELLNESS 117: Behavior Change: Building A Better You

Change behaviors using evidence-based techniques. Addresses the roles of habit cycles, procrastination mitigation, productivity enhancement, motivational factors, self-compassion, and addiction and addictive processes (both substances and non-substance related) in changing behaviors from maladaptive to adaptive patterns. Drawing from current findings in the neuroscience and psychology of behavior change and habit formation, utilize motivational interviewing, cognitive reframing, peer coaching, and mindfulness meditation models and intervention strategies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyer Tapia, S. (PI)

WELLNESS 122: Work With Purpose: Design Your Career

Presents meaningful work as an essential component for life-long wellbeing. Discusses decision making, navigating change, mindfulness, self-compassion, and resilience as these topics relate to your career journey. Blends lecture, discussion, individual and group coaching, and small and large group interactions. Learning activities enhance theoretical knowledge and guide career-related decisions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Paspa, P. (PI)

WELLNESS 123: Living on Purpose

Explore the art and science of purpose-finding as it relates to living a more flourishing life at Stanford and beyond. Investigate the contemplative, psychological, social, and communal factors that deepen meaning-making, support authenticity, and encourage living more purposefully. Drawing from disciplines as diverse as art, storytelling, design, and positive psychology, create and utilize tools that promote wellbeing. Highly interactive course employs creative expression, group and individual activities, discussions, lectures, and mini-field trips to reflect on fundamental human questions in pragmatic ways.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

WELLNESS 130: Meditation

Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, mindfulness and mantra meditation will be offered to enhance stress management and well-being. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

WELLNESS 136: Meditation and the Brain: Practicing the Science and Art of Contemplation

Investigate the power of meditation for training the mind and changing the brain, specifically in focusing attention, enhancing awareness, and generating compassion. Going beyond meditation as a tool for simply reducing stress, this course grounds the theory and practice of meditation in a neuroscientific understanding of how meditation changes brain structures and functioning in service of increasing overall cognitive performance and psychological wellbeing. Learn how to apply specific frameworks and tools for effectively practicing meditation in daily life.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

WELLNESS 138: Mindfulness and Stress Management

Effectively manage stress through mindfulness meditation strategies (sitting and movement-based) that positively impact the brain-body system to enhance clarity, focus, and energy. Examine tools for assessing perceived stress and mindfulness, current findings in the science of stress management and meditation, and cognitive-behavioral theories and interventions demonstrated to reduce stress and enhance well-being. Course is based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) curriculum.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyer Tapia, S. (PI)
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