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STRAMGT 110Q: Making Sense of Strategy

Get the strategy right, and the chance for success is great. Nowhere is this more evident than in today's world of major challenges. Strategy is at the heart of problem solving and achieving objectives, yet few people can define strategy, much less understand how to conceptualize, design, and execute effective strategies that yield the best outcomes.This course will meet once a week to focus on interesting and engaging case studies, each of which illustrates a key ingredient of strategy. Some are well-known historical events, while others are less obvious, but all have a strategic lesson to share. They are quite diverse, from the planning of a high-risk rescue in the Colorado Rockies, to a product crisis in a Fortune 50 company, to a little-known failed military mission of WWII, to a commercial airline disaster. The ability to think through challenging and varied scenarios is both instructive and mind-stretching. There will be some pre-reading on each case study and there may be a field trip for students to put their lessons into practice. The course is designed to be highly interactive; all to enable students to unravel the mystery and power of strategic thinking. Students will also have the opportunity to select and analyze a case reflecting interests of their own. This course can help students not only prepare for a career in a range of fields, but also as they meet the challenges of their current coursework. Problem-solving skills are central in every walk of life; this seminar can help students build a stronger foundation for sound decision-making.
Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Demarest, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 207: Strategic Leadership

This course examines fundamental issues of general management and leadership within an organization. You will learn about setting an organization's strategic direction, aligning structure to implement strategy, and leading individuals within the firm. You will master concepts, frameworks, and tools to assess an industry and a firm's competitive environment, and to craft alternatives. You will study the interplay among formal structure, informal networks, and culture in shaping organizational performance. By integrating leadership theory, the lessons of practical application, and your own experience, you will develop skills and capabilities essential to leading others. And you'll gain a better understanding of your own leadership preferences, strengths, and weaknesses.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 210: Managerial Skills

In the Managerial Skills Labs we examine several common managerial challenges faced by executives. Together with Faculty, students explore these topics using four case examples, each asking students to evaluate a series of situations, develop alternatives for their resolution, and ultimately recommend and implement a course of action from the point of view of the company's owner/manager. We have selected small to midsized businesses as the context for these discussions in order to highlight the impact that key decisions and their implementation can have on the broader organization. Class preparation should include not only analysis and conclusions, but also specific recommendations on implementation. Students should come to class prepared to role play important conversations between management and other key individuals.
Units: 1 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 258: MSx: Strategic Management

This course deals with the overall general management of the business enterprise. Extensive case studies of a variety of companies of differing size, industry, and current conditions provide the basis for the comprehensive analysis and establishment of a strategic management approach for the organization. Frameworks are presented for strategy identification and evaluation; assessing industry attractiveness; evaluating the firm's capabilities, resources, and position; determining the optimal horizontal and vertical scope of the firm; entering into strategic alliances and joint ventures; and formulating and implementing strategy in multi-business organizations.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Hartmann, W. (PI)

STRAMGT 259: MSx: Generative Leadership

There are three major sections to this course - Design Thinking, The Improvisational Mindset, and High Performance Communication. || Design Thinking || Outcome: Participants learn to employ User Centered Design as promoted by the Stanford d.school. They become adept at Empathizing with the end user, practicing focused Need Finding, Defining the Problem, Ideating, Rapidly Prototyping and Adapting to Feedback. || Experiences: Participants learn the Design Thinking process through a hands-on, collaborative design challenge, like redesigning the Briefcase for a specific user. || The Improvisational Mindset || Outcome: The participants increase their ability to respond flexibly to novel situations and to generate innovative solutions on a collaborative, creative team. The mindset is cultivated by practicing 5 key principles. Say "Yes, and". Treat Mistakes as Gifts. Inspire your Partner. Dare to be Obvious. Notice the World. || Experiences: The key principles are taught through a series of immersive theater exercises derived from Johnstone, Spolin, and Ryan. Valuable readings include IMPROV WISDOM, by Patricia Madson and journal articles on improv and brainstorming. || High Performance Communication || Outcome: The final segment of the class is a chance to apply the principles of User Centered Design and the Improvisational Mindset to design and deliver messages that go beyond just transmitting information - they get results. Participants successfully use a version of the Design Thinking process to rapidly develop content that is tuned to the audience's needs, and that they can deliver in a way that is agile and responsive to real time feedback. || Experiences: Generative Leadership culminates in a group presentation designed to influence key stakeholders. To be successful, participants will have to draw on all sections of the course. AS WE SPEAK is our text.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 305: Game Theory and Competitive Strategy

This course is an advanced applications economics course. The course has two main components, game theory and competitive strategy. Game theory is the field of study of interactive strategic decision making. In recent years it has become a prominent approach in both research and in practice. We will apply game theoretical models to a variety of industry, market and other relational settings. Beyond the use of game theory in competitive strategy in general, we will spend a significant part of the course studying competitive advantages in depth. In particular, we will cover the various types of competitive advantages and barriers to entry, attributes of an advantage, the creation and dynamics of advantages and more.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 306: Food, Health & Nutrition Entrepreneurship

Americans spend nearly 7% of their income on food items and another 5% on food services annually (US Census). Food spend is at the intersection of two of the most important industries in the US: health care and agriculture. Food production today supports the food consumption causing our extraordinary burden of disease; 75 cents of every dollar of the $4.8 billion spent annually on health care is for diet-related disease. The health care system accounts for over 17% of U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). Agriculture and agriculture-related industries contributed 4.8% to the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) in 2012. This course focuses on the shifting landscapes across these industries and subsequent market opportunities in food, health, and nutrition. The course is designed for students with a broad interest in the food or health systems and/or who are interested in careers in related fields. We will examine the food system from three points of view: the consumer, nutritional science, and policy. The class will focus on solving for consumer needs from the perspective of a health-promoting entrepreneur. The class will involve lecture, discussion, and prominent guest speakers who are entrepreneurs themselves or industry leaders.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 307: Innovation in Healthcare Venture Capital Investing

The purpose of this course is to provide students with insights into the newest innovations in healthcare service delivery, information technology, biotech and medical devices and how venture and private equity investors evaluate and determine where to invest their money among these areas to maximize return, minimize risk, and capitalize on a highly fluid marketplace that represents nearly 20% of the U.S. GDP. Through presentations by leading entrepreneurs in the field, students will be challenged to reach conclusions regarding which healthcare sectors are the most promising for venture investing and which individual companies presented reflect the best opportunities, particularly in light of the seismic shifts currently underway within the healthcare industry driven by both public and private considerations. This is not primarily a finance class, but more substantively about the nuances of emerging healthcare businesses and venture finance as applied to this very unique sector.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 308: Entrepreneurship from Diverse Perspectives

This seminar showcases the diversity of entrepreneurs and the range of entrepreneurial paths they pursue. Thirty-five entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, primarily woman and under-represented minorities, will share their personal and professional journeys, and how each embodies the entrepreneurial mindset. Case studies, readings and videos, will complement in-class discussions with the speakers in exploring the entire entrepreneurial process from finding an idea and forming and building a team, to being an inclusive leader, raising money, assembling a board, and overcoming setbacks and challenges. The class teaches the entrepreneurial mindset, and how everyone can be entrepreneurial in their lives. Teams will work on creating an idea for a company during the quarter.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 309: Strategies of Effective Product Management

This is a course about exploring the methods and processes for product management, largely in technology companies, and a look at what can lead to the most effective ways to coordinate customer needs, ensure accurate product development, and how to develop and use the appropriate tools needed to successfully sell products and services to customers from the perspective of the Product Manager. The course covers ways to think about product management depending on the type of product being delivered (new product introduction vs. reinvigorating an existing product) and also the skills and tools used by product managers for effective product management.This course is an extended version of STRAMGT 509.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 315: From Launch to Liquidity

This course considers the challenges faced by start-ups in achieving liquidity. We take the perspectives of organizational behavior, marketing, and finance, and examine forks in the road faced by firms that have already launched products. Marketing topics include how to market firms for sale and calculating the addressable market. Organizational topics include hiring and firing, and the role of founders after sales. Finance topics include how the choice between sale and IPO affects value realized, and private equity exits.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 316: Fundamentals of Effective Selling

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of how to sell and to what selling is truly about. The course is appropriate for anyone who wants to understand and show proficiency with the skills required by different selling situations (e.g., direct sales of products and services, selling oneself in an interview, raising money for a new venture, running a company as CEO, etc.). The course looks at the entire selling process of lead generation, prospecting, qualification, discovery, understanding value, customizing presentations, objection handling, negotiation and closing. This is not a typical GSB case-study-based course. Students who have taken the class describe it as a hands-on, practical, skills-based class. Students will work by themselves and together in groups to complete individual and team-based exercises designed to introduce them to and give them practice with selling fundamentals in each stage of the selling process. Students will be practicing and utilizing newly learned skills in real life each week; the focus will be on doing stuff (e.g., using curiosity in a situation outside the classroom) rather than thinking about and talking about stuff. Students will then come together in class with the instructors to share and process the learning from these exercises.nn
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 319: Equity By Design: Building Diverse and Inclusive Organizations

This course equips you to create and build equitable organizations. We will discuss the power of inclusion as it relates to the employee and customer experience. We will study effective strategies for building diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers that can often exist. We'll look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience - from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. Finally, we'll dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging. Experts in diversity and inclusion, and executives at companies that have successfully incorporated inclusion programs, will join us for the class discussions.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 323: Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking

We'd like to introduce you to Samantha Palmer, a recent Stanford graduate who took several classes at the d.school. Each class further confirmed the importance of the design thinking process, methodology, and community. By the end of her Stanford career she truly believed that design thinking had the potential to change her life.n nAs graduation approached, Samantha found a position at a large tech company in Silicon Valley and was excited to bring the design thinking methodologies with her. A few weeks into her new job, she asked her team if they wanted to talk to some users before launching into their next big project. She was met with a room of blank stares and apprehensive questions. n nHow might we give Samantha the skills she needs to change the mindset of her colleagues, spark design thinking at her company, and get her first design-driven project off the ground? n nWhen you take a class at the d.school, you walk away confident in your creative skills and fluent in the design process. However, when recent graduates (re)enter the workforce, they quickly become discouraged by the stagnancy of company cultures. They see the need to trigger and sustain change, but don¿t have the understanding of organizational psychology to do so. Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking asks you to take on Samantha¿s challenges. n nOver the course of the semester, students will engage in 2 large-scale projects:n- Project 1 (Empathy - Synthesis) - Working with partner companies, students will apply organizational psychology and design frameworks to better understand company culture.n- Project 2 (Ideation - Testing) - Using their work from Project 1, students will prototype and test organizational changes in real company settings.nn**Please note** Our class will take an experimental approach Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking. The majority of classes will be conducted in the field allowing students to take a hands-on approach to design thinking. Please be aware and build travel time into your class schedule.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 325: Formation of Impact Ventures

This class is for students who want to start, invest in, or take a senior position in a social impact venture. For the purposes of this class, a social impact venture is an organization (both for profits and non-profits) whose primary mission is to provide a sustainable solution to a social problem. The class covers venture creation and development, resource acquisition, and managing growth in the context of impact ventures. The class deals with situations from the perspectives of both the entrepreneur and investor. Students will have a chance to assess opportunity and action in the context of current impact ventures. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. We will have a mix of case discussions, lectures, student-led in-class exercises, and guest speakers. The final project involves engagement with an emerging impact venture and its management. The instructors, Laura Hattendorf and Russell Siegelman, are active, early stage impact investors.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 328: Social Ventures Practicum

The Social Ventures Practicum is an experiential learning course for student teams actively working to launch a social venture (nonprofit or for-profit or tbd). SVP is often a useful follow-on for social venture start-up teams after product/service ideation courses such as STRAMGT 356: Startup Garage, the Design for Extreme Affordability sequence, or other startup/design thinking. In all cases, this course will focus on the additional elements of business planning needed to launch your venture successfully. Students who are beginning with a less-developed product/service idea for a social venture but are interested in taking this course are encouraged to reach out to the instructors, who will try to match them with existing teams. Other students who wish to take SVP to learn about social ventures but do not have a product/service idea similarly should reach out to instructors to see if they can be matched.In weekly sessions throughout the quarter, teams will work through topics unique to social ventures (e.g. mission, theory of change, impact measurement) as well as topics common to any venture, (e.g. product/service market fit, business/economic model, financial planning, early-stage financing, logistics, sales/distribution, and board/talent development). Each team will receive significant one-on-one coaching from the instructors, as well as opportunities to share their work with peers and learn from/present to guest speakers.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 330: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Partnership for Growth

This 3 unit course is designed for students interested in early-stage investing, venture capital, and/or entrepreneurship. The course content and projects are designed to be complementary to the dozens of great GSB courses about entrepreneurship such as Start-up Garage, Entrepreneurial Finance, Formation of New Ventures and Lean Launchpad. Our course, S330 -- Entrepreneurship & Venture Capital; Partnership for Growth, is one of a handful of GSB courses that delivers the investor¿s and entrepreneurs¿ viewpoint in a very candid format. The course takes the student on a journey divided into 3 different segments (investor strategies, current issues that affect your start-up, and best practices as you build your company). We have carefully selected 5 relevant topics for each segment. In the first segment of the course, we invite 5 different investors to illustrate the range of investor strategies as well as their differences in how they select their next big investment opportunity. These investors represent Funds who are leaders in each of their specialties, such as Floodgate, Founder¿s Fund and the venture debt firm, WTI. The second segment of the course highlights 5 current issues that affect entrepreneurs as they launch their idea in this rapidly changing investor environment. These topics range from how to build an effective board to why there are not more women in VC to the consequences of `too much money¿ in the VC ecosystem. The third segment of the course covers 5 tactical steps that are important to entrepreneurs as they build their company. We begin with how co-founders split their founder equity and then hear Mike Maples reflect on best practices for idea formation and scaling. We conclude with trade-offs in negotiating that first term sheet. Please see the syllabus for more specifics about course content and the business idea project. nThe majority of the classes are case-based, where the guest speakers (who are often the case protagonists) discuss how the issues in each case are relevant to today¿s start-up. We encourage challenging and meaningful class discussion to take the guests `off-script¿ and focus on sharing the `street smarts¿ of the entrepreneur and investor community. The course attracts students from many different backgrounds ¿ those who are experienced entrepreneurs to those students who are experimenting with the idea of entrepreneurship for the first time. We also see students with significant investment experience share their start-up experience as they add to the class dynamic.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 335: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Lee, G. (PI)

STRAMGT 340: POWer: Building the Entrepreneurial Mindset from the Perspective of Women

This seminar will showcase women entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. We will explore the challenges and opportunities they encountered in starting and growing their ventures, and the personal and professional choices they have made. The sessions will include cases, readings, videos, panel discussions, role plays and breakout groups with the entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. The class will help you understand and build your entrepreneurial and growth mindset. You will leave the class with an individual roadmap and tools to help you be entrepreneurial throughout your career. Men are encouraged to enroll.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Mandelbaum, F. (PI)

STRAMGT 350: Global Value Chain Strategies

This course addresses how the increasingly large number of firms that use or provide outsourcing and "offshoring" can create a sustainable competitive advantage. Students who complete the course will have a framework and a set of concepts that can be used to position a firm for strategic advantage in these supply networks. Positioning in and strategic analysis of product markets is covered in a variety of courses and books. A distinguishing feature of this course is that it addresses positioning and strategic analysis for firms operating as part of a network of providers, sellers and buyers... the factor markets. The course takes a general management perspective and provides examples through cases and discussions with visitors. The major theme of the course is that these firms must carefully consider how they position themselves in both the product and factor markets.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 351: Building and Managing Professional Sales Organizations

The focus of this class is on the challenges and key issues associated with the creation and management of a professional sales organization. Our emphasis is developing and managing the selling effort of business-to-business and business-to-consumer capital goods and services. There will be relatively little emphasis on sales technique (i.e., students should not expect a course on "How to be a Better Salesperson"). The course is organized to follow the development of the sales function from strategic inception through to execution and implementation: choosing a go-to-market model (e.g., direct sales, no/low touch, VARs, OEMs, hybrid models); building and structuring the sales organization (e.g., sales learning curve, organizational structure, allocating territories and quotas); and managing the sales force (e.g., hiring/firing, compensation, forecasting, culture). We will address these topics in the context of both early stage ventures and later stage enterprises.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 353: Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures

This course is offered for students who at some time may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by pursuing opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business. The course deals with case situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager rather than the passive investor. Many cases involve visitors, since the premise is that opportunity and action have large idiosyncratic components. Students must assess opportunity and action in light of the perceived capabilities of the individuals and the nature of the environments they face. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. Each section will have a specific focus.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 354: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

Many of America's most successful entrepreneurial companies have been substantially influenced by professionally managed venture capital. This relationship is examined from both the entrepreneur's and the venture capitalist's perspective. From the point of view of the entrepreneur, the course considers how significant business opportunities are identified, planned, and built into real companies; how resources are matched with opportunity; and how, within this framework, entrepreneurs seek capital and other assistance from venture capitalists or other sources. From the point of view of the venture capitalist, the course considers how potential entrepreneurial investments are evaluated, valued, structured, and enhanced; how different venture capital strategies are deployed; and how venture capitalists raise and manage their own funds. The course includes a term-long project where students work in teams (4-5 students per team) to write a business plan (or a business model canvas) for a venture of the team's choosing.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 355: Managing Growing Enterprises

This course is offered for students who, in the near term, aspire to the management and full or partial ownership of a new or newly-acquired business. The seminar, which is limited to 45 students, has a strong implementation focus, and deals in some depth with certain selected, generic entrepreneurial issues, viewed from the perspective of the owner/manager. Broad utilization is made of case materials, background readings, visiting experts, and role playing. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the application of analytical tools to administrative practice.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 356: The Startup Garage: Design

Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model. This course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. It integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. The course focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills (using short lectures and in-class exercises) and then applying these skills to specific problems faced by those users identified by the teams. Teams will get out of the building and interact directly with users and advisers to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 359: Aligning Start-ups with their Market

Most everyone associated with technology start-ups would agree that the most important initial characteristic of a successful endeavor is a compelling vision. The journey from vision to escape velocity is highly dependent on management's ability to translate that vision into a product or service that closely and economically addresses a customer's significant point of pain. Without a tight product market fit, the start-up's offering will not be able to break through the market's gravitational forces which strongly favor existing solutions, resulting in likely failure. With tight product/market fit, it is far more likely the company will achieve repeatable and growing sales success. Conventional wisdom dictates that a start-up launching a new product should focus its energy understanding what the market wants (problem) and then translating that knowledge into an optimal set of product features (solution). This is the ideal strategy if one is attacking a market that already exists. However if the start-up pursues an entirely new market or re-segments an existing market, customers are unlikely to be able to articulate the benefits and features they will need. The approaches required to pursue new or re-segmented markets are radically different from those applied to existing markets. As a result it is not relentless execution and exploitation of a well understood market that will lead to success, but discovery of a new market or segment that is in need of the product as envisioned. If done well, this process of finding the optimal product/market fit has a disproportionate impact on success. Our course explores the many issues associated with optimizing product/market fit. A take-home midterm, a group paper, and an in-class exercise comprise 50% of a student's grade with class participation representing the remainder. STRAMGT 353 is recommended prior to taking this course.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 360: Strategic Educational Research and Organizational Reform Practicum A

This is a two-quarter clinical course offered in the Winter and Spring Quarters that brings together upper-level graduate students in business, law, and education from Stanford to collaborate with their peers at other universities (Columbia University, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan) and provide strategic research and consulting to public education organizations. Participants engage in a rigorous and rewarding learning experience, including:nn(i) An intensive seminar in the design, leadership and management, and transformation of public school systems, charter management organizations, start-ups, and other K-12 public- and social-sector institutions;nn(ii) Comprehensive skills training in team-based problem solving, strategic policy research, managing multidimensional (operational, policy, legal) projects to specified outcomes in complex environments, client counseling, and effective communication; andnn(iii) A high-priority consulting project for a public education sector client (e.g., school district, state education agency, charter management organization, non-profit) designing and implementing solutions to a complex problem at the core of the organization's mission to improve the educational outcomes and life chances of children. The participant's team work will allow public agencies throughout the nation to receive relevant, timely, and high-quality research and advice on institutional reforms that otherwise may not receive the attention they deserve.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 361: Strategic Educational Research and Organizational Reform Practicum B

This is a two-quarter clinical course offered in the Winter and Spring Quarters that brings together upper-level graduate students in business, law, and education from Stanford to collaborate with their peers at other universities (Columbia University, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan) and provide strategic research and consulting to public education organizations. Participants engage in a rigorous and rewarding learning experience, including:nn(i) An intensive seminar in the design, leadership and management, and transformation of public school systems, charter management organizations, start-ups, and other K-12 public- and social-sector institutions;nn(ii) Comprehensive skills training in team-based problem solving, strategic policy research, managing multidimensional (operational, policy, legal) projects to specified outcomes in complex environments, client counseling, and effective communication; andnn(iii) A high-priority consulting project for a public education sector client (e.g., school district, state education agency, charter management organization, non-profit) designing and implementing solutions to a complex problem at the core of the organization's mission to improve the educational outcomes and life chances of children. The participant's team work will allow public agencies throughout the nation to receive relevant, timely, and high-quality research and advice on institutional reforms that otherwise may not receive the attention they deserve.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 364: Health Information Technology and Strategy

Health Information technology was intended to help reduce cost and improve the quality of health care services. To date, this is little evidence that this goal has been achieved. This course is designed to explore economic frameworks that can help us to understand how health IT can achieve it's intended goals. These frameworks build from general business and economic models used successfully in other industries. The course will utilize both business cases and lecture to prepare students to propose potential novel applications of health information technology solutions. Each student will have a team-based final project.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; Schulman, K. (PI)

STRAMGT 366: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

Teams that concluded at the end of the fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, continue with the winter quarter course. In this course, the teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model , perform a series of experiments to test the key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs. The key premise for the course is that a robust venture creation process involves development and validation of a series of hypotheses about a new product or service, its value proposition, and how the business will acquire customers, make money, scale up to achieve profitability, and raise funds to achieve the key milestones to profitability. In Startup Garage: Testing and Launch, teams will learn how to precisely formulate these hypotheses and early stage milestones, and how to test them using one or more of the following low-cost approaches: a) online experiments with minimally viable products; b) interviews with partners, advisors, investors, and business experts; c) analogies from existing businesses that were successful in proving hypotheses that are analogous to what the new startup wants to prove. The course focuses on further developing entrepreneurial skills using the same pedagogical approach used in S356: short lectures, extensive in-class exercises focused on each team's specific projects, and 'get out of the building' assignments. Teams will have the opportunity to:- Get out of the building and interact with users, advisors, investors and partners to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face, to field test their proposed services, products, and business models, and to gather data.- Interpret the data and make important startup decisions in the context of their own project: pivot, persevere, or perish- Develop creative go-to-market strategies and test their effectiveness- Develop and deliver in front of real investors an investor pitch, elevator pitch and executive summary- Negotiate term sheets with venture investors- Develop a hiring plan for their first year of operation and consider equity and other compensation plan
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 368: Strategic Leadership of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Meehan, B. (PI)

STRAMGT 371: Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation

This course focuses on the strategic management of technology-based innovation in the firm. The purpose is to provide students with concepts, frameworks, and experiences that are useful for taking part in the management of innovation processes in both startups and large technology-focused organizations. The course examines how leaders can manage fast-changing technological innovations effectively. Specific topics include: assessing the innovative capabilities of the firm, managing the technical function in a company, navigating the interfaces between functional groups in the development function in the firm, understanding and managing technical entrepreneurs, building technology-based distinctive competencies and competitive advantages, technological leadership versus followership in competitive strategy, institutionalizing innovation, attracting and keeping entrepreneurs.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 381: Leading Strategic Change in the Health Care Industry

In this seminar we will study the structure and dynamics of the U.S. health care industry, especially in the face of ongoing regulatory change, and ways it intersects with the global health care industry. The seminar's aim is to develop participants' ability to create strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring and workable in this highly dynamic environment. The seminar's pedagogy involves informed debate to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants and instructors, as well as the writing and presentation of position papers by small groups of seminar participants on the key dynamics of the industry.In the course of the seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the societal, industry and organizational levels of analysis. After developing a complete picture of the structure of the health care industry and the strategic relationships among the key players ("the strategic landscape"), the seminar will focus on how health care reform and other external forces will affect the strategic opportunities and challenges of four types of players in the strategic landscape: (1) incumbents; (2) entrepreneurial startups; (3) cross-boundary disruptors; and (4) international health care providers. World-class leaders in health care will be brought in to supplement our understanding of each one of these players. Student teams will be formed to focus on one of the four types of players. Each team will prepare a research paper focused on determining how their type of player can take advantage of the regulatory, technological, social, cultural and demographic changes, and who will be the likely winners and why.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 502: Systems Leadership for the Digital Industrial Transformation

This course explores the details of how leaders at the world's biggest companies are driving frame-breaking transformational change inside of organizations that have grown up with an industrial foundation, or who are moving into the industrial sector as a new entrant. The course will delve into the need for systems thinking at multiple levels - of products, organizations, cultures and individuals. We will draw upon both academic theories of transformational organizational change and also the real-world implementation challenges that confront leaders who are moving simultaneously with both unprecedented scale and speed. The sessions will examine a variety of firms and industries being affected by the blend of digital and physical in order to lay out the unique operational and organizational challenges in a global context. How specifically should operating rhythms be changed and adjusted during this radical transformation? How does management both train a workforce with new skillsets and also hire new employees with different talents? What are the unique internal challenges for industrial firms as they add digital products and services? What are the likely forces of resistance to these changes, and how should leaders effectively move companies whose histories have spanned over 100+ years? How should management ensure that existing revenue streams do not atrophy prematurely and how should these challenges be communicated to public markets?In addition, from the perspective of new entrants, we will study how companies can quickly grow and scale when leadership has the benefit of being unencumbered by legacy systems, but also face unexpected challenges when they do not have the deep industry and domain knowledge or institutional culture that can provide insights into the demands of customers, channels and governments.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 503: Spontaneous Management

In this class, you will learn techniques for improving your spontaneity, creativity, presence, and collaboration skills, all of which contribute to your becoming a more effective and inspirational leader. This class is based on the techniques that improv actors use on stage when they make up scenes, songs, or even entire plays on the spot. Improv teaches you to do many things at once: be completely present, think on your feet, quickly get in sync with others, read the room, and be agile at using what the situation presents you. As a leader in business, you will benefit from this same skill set. Whether you are presenting to your board, brainstorming & designing with colleagues, or mentoring new talent - learning some building blocks of improv will give you valuable new tools for interacting effectively with others. The course will cover topics such as storytelling, effective brainstorming, understanding and using status, creative collaboration, and risk taking.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: ; Wheeler, S. (PI)

STRAMGT 504: Innovation and Non-founder CEOs

This course examines how companies innovate after the success of their first product, and why non-founder led companies are often less successful at this than founder led companies. We focus on how non-founder CEOs can drive more innovation while managing risk and potential failure. Our emphasis will be primarily on lessons that can be applied to technology companies, although many are relevant to other industries. Our goal is to help develop successful non-founder CEOs.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 509: Strategies of Effective Product Management

This is a course about exploring the methods and processes for product management, largely in technology companies, and a look at what can lead to the most effective ways to coordinate customer needs, ensure accurate product development, and how to develop and use the appropriate tools needed to successfully sell products and services to customers from the perspective of the Product Manager. The course covers ways to think about product management depending on the type of product being delivered (new product introduction vs. reinvigorating an existing product) and also the skills and tools used by product managers for effective product management.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 510: Conversations in Management

This case-based course is offered for students who want to refine their ability to manage challenging professional conversations. The class, which is limited to 32 students, will focus on the preparation for and execution of role-played dialogue as well as on postmortem analysis. Most of the respondent roles will be external to one's company, and some will be front line or mid-level people with limited educational credentials. Broad utilization will be made of background readings plus visiting case protagonists and experts. There will be nine class sessions, each of one hour and forty-five minutes.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 511: Protecting Ideas

Today, the assets of many businesses are largely intangible, such as brands, data, software and trade secrets. More and more we live in an economy based on intangibles and much of business involves creating, exploiting and managing those intangible assets. Intellectual property rights (patents, trade secrets, copyright, trademarks design rights and so on) and data rights are a set of legal rights and assets that establish ownership of and protect tangible and intangible assets from copying and other acts¿for example copying of software or counterfeiting of designer handbags. Equally, intellectual property in the hands of third parties may pose a risk to a business developing a new product or brand. Most businesses start with an idea. It is critical to understand when and under what circumstances ideas, creative works and technology can be protected from third party use by intellectual property, and what limits apply to that protection. It is equally critical to recognize what must be done to secure ownership. In this course you will learn about IP rights-what they are, what they do, their limitations and how they are useful from a strategic perspective¿well beyond the typical idea of a patent being nothing more than an invitation to a messy and expensive lawsuit. We will also discuss the all-too-common mistakes that can frustrate these objectives. To put these issues into a business setting, we will be joined by experienced business executives and investors in markets ranging from biosciences to software to sound engineering. The format of this course will be lecture, first by the teaching faculty and then by the guest speakers, with engaged, real-time Q&A for both. Guest speakers will share their experiences in the area of IP investment, management, deployment, strategy and risk. This course is designed for business students, not law students. It is the objective of this course to help business students to think critically about when and how to invest in intellectual property protection, to recognize its limits, and to avoid the common mistakes that can frustrate such investments and undermine the value of the company. Although we will have to introduce you to legal concepts, the focus of the course is on putting these concepts into a business setting and explaining how IP may be used strategically¿enabling you to be part of the conversation with legal and intellectual property experts and to consider how IP can support management of the assets and strategy of a business or other enterprise. No prior knowledge or experience with intellectual property is needed.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Johnson, S. (PI)

STRAMGT 512: The Yin and Yang of Family Business Transitions

This seminar provides students with practical solutions to some of the challenges faced in family business transitions.Family businesses are by far the dominant form of commerce world-wide, albeit the majority are small "mom and pop shops." Some research shows that large businesses, whatever the form of ownership, have an average lifespan of around forty years, while small businesses (at least in Japan and Europe) average around twelve years. So, if businesses in general do not survive, then it is a wonder that any family business can survive from one generation to another, let alone two, three, four or more.There are three essential requirements to succeed in a family business transition. First, it may seem obvious that the business must succeed, but it is less obvious what advantages a family business has over its non-family-owned counterparts. Second, the ownership structure must effectively maintain family cohesion and support the business. Finally, family members need to organize in thoughtful ways to work effectively with one another.The beauty of a family business is that it can be more profitable than companies with non-family ownership. Two fundamentals, at least, provide this advantage - a strong value system and a long-term economic perspective. The operative word above, however, is "can"; it is by no means a foregone conclusion that a family business will be more successful. Families must thoughtfully develop their advantages, while at the same time avoiding the pitfalls that are inherent in any family business.Accordingly, this course is offered for students whose families own a family business or who are interested in the special challenges faced by family businesses. International students are encouraged to register as different cultural perspectives to family business will enrich the experience for everyone. Particular focus will be given to the transitions from one generation to another and the lessons learned that can be applied during the entire life of the business.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: ; Francis, P. (PI)

STRAMGT 516: Fundamentals of Effective Selling

This course looks at the entire selling process of prospecting, qualification, discovery, customization, objection handling, relationship building, and closing. Our primary objective is to offer a hands-on, skills-based class in which students work together in groups to practice the fundamentals of effective selling. Over the six sessions of this compressed course, we will focus on the following aspects of effective selling: creating a value-based prospecting script; meeting objections with curiosity (rather than argument); using advanced questioning to qualify prospects and understand the problems, impacts, ideals and benefits of potential customers; creating customized presentations that map your solution to your customer¿s needs; using interaction to promote customer engagement; accelerating the process of building trust and developing relationships; and overcoming the limiting beliefs associated with closing deals and obtaining commitments from customers. By the end of the course, you will not only have more confidence, but also a sales toolkit that you will be able to customize and deploy when you encounter selling situations in the future. The course is appropriate for anyone who wants to understand and become more proficient with the skills required in different selling situations. Our experience suggests that students who have a particular selling context in mind ¿ such as a new product to sell ¿ will benefit from this course, but this is not required. If you want to feel more confident in both traditional and non-traditional selling situations ¿ like pitching to an investor or selling yourself in a job interview ¿ this course will be helpful.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 518: Advertising and Monetization

Advances in advertising technology, such as online publishing, digital and mobile advertising platforms, as well as new ways of consuming video content are driving a rapid evolution of the advertising market. We analyze this evolution from the perspective of three main constituents: 1) Marketers who rely on advertising to launch and sustain product sales, 2) Publishers and media owners for whom advertising often represents the largest source of monetization, and 3) Advertising agencies who design, plan and buy media for advertising campaigns. We will review challenges and opportunities from each of the three perspectives, including challenges in measurement for advertisers as well as forces that make it hard for small and medium sized publishers to monetize solely through advertising. Guest speakers provide a perspective on current trends and technologies.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 519: Equity By Design: Building Diverse and Inclusive Organizations

This course equips you to create, build and lead equitable organizations. We will learn the power of iD&I - that is, how we can be change agents by involving key stakeholders, casting the right vision, and constructing the right interactions to unlock the true potential of diversity in teams and organizations. We will discuss the power of inclusion as itrelates to the employee and customer experience. We will study effective strategies for designing diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers and myths related to meritocracy. We'll look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience - from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. We'll dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging. Finally, we will learn tools and techniques to empower change for ourselves and others. Experts in diversity and inclusion, and executives at companies that have successfully incorporated inclusion programs, will join us for the class discussions.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 520: The Industrialist's Dilemma

This course explores how digital disruptions are having tectonic shifts on large, successful and established companies, whether they have a digital foundation or not. Both new and existing high technology firms such as Google, Amazon, Stripe, Airbnb and others are reshaping industries as disparate as life sciences and transportation. The management principles, competitive strategies, partnerships, and core competencies of the 20th century are being challenged in a world of bits and the global network in which all companies are forced to compete. In this course we will explore some of the fundamental technological changes impacting these industries, such as scaling assets without owning them, partnerships with digital leaders and new distribution strategies for goods and services. We will hear from executives of both leading Fortune 500 companies and new disruptors about what it takes to survive and thrive in this new digital economy.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 524: Longevity: Business Implications and Opportunities

People age 50 and over account for over 50% of consumer spending in the US and 83% of household wealth, with both number expected to increase significantly due to a combination of increased longevity and the aging of the baby boomer generation. It is the largest and one of the fastest growing business opportunities US and worldwide. Many business managers and entrepreneurs, however, do not consider the over 50 demographic in their plans, and those that do often do not understand how best to design products and services for this group. It is a huge missed opportunity. This class will explore how managers and entrepreneurs should consider the older population in their strategies, in product and service design, in managing their work force, and in their own careers. Class topics will include: - The over age 50 opportunity and how it will grow over the coming years - The map of life and segmenting the older population - Considerations for developing products and services that are multi-generational and appealing to older consumers - New business opportunities created by the growth in the over 50 population, social trends, and technology n - Managing older workers -Career considerations in a world where individuals live longer and healthier lives. The course would be two units offered Winter quarter, and would be taught using a mix of new cases developed for the class, guest speakers (some in conjunction with cases), and lectures.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 529: Marketplaces for Goods and Services

In this class we will analyze the economics and strategy of marketplaces and platforms for goods and services. We will consider the forces that have led to the proliferation of these marketplaces, as well as the economics behind which ones are likely to succeed and become profitable. We will analyze the economic costs and benefits of these marketplaces for society, and consider the regulatory environment and challenges. We will also study the microeconomics of managing these marketplaces: how should matching work, how can marketplace design solve problems of congestion or market thinness, and how a platform should trade off the welfare of the different sides of the market as it enters and grows. Applications include ride-sharing and transportation; room-sharing and vacation rentals; on-demand labor and services such as babysitting, massage, manual labor, and dog-sitting; dating; and organized labor markets.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 532: Intellectual Property: Financial and Strategic Management

In today's competitive marketplace, companies -- from Fortune 500 firms to early stage start-ups -- rely on intellectual property (IP) to keep them one step ahead of the game. Yet, critical IP decisions are usually made by lawyers with very little input from management. The purpose of this class is to provide business leaders with the tools, models and institutional knowledge to actively participate in managing and growing their company's IP assets as strategic business assets (with a focus on patents). This class will explore the value of corporate IP assets by thinking strategically on how to effectively leverage the knowledge, trade secrets, patents, technologies, trademarks, structures and processes that are critical across industries. We will focus on the elements of a successful IP strategy, and how that strategy is shaped by economic, technology, legal, regulatory, and market factors. Through a combination of case studies (including a group strategy project), analysis of current events, class discussion and guest speakers, we will cover a variety of issues shaping a successful IP strategy in today's global business environment. Some of the topics covered include: * Building and managing an IP portfolio that is aligned with business objectives;* Understanding the forces shaping the IP marketplace in the US and in foreign markets;* The innovation cycle and technology transfer mechanisms;* Using big data analytics in making IP decisions;* IP portfolio monetization strategies (e.g., licensing, sale, enforcement);* IP considerations in Mergers & Acquisitions;* IP valuation and current trends in patent transactions;* Managing corporate IP litigation risk (patent trolls, incumbent litigation);* IP strategies for start-ups & entrepreneurs.Ms. Efrat Kasznik is an IP valuation and strategy expert with more than twenty years of experience advising companies of all sizes, from startups to Fortune 100s, on extracting value from their IP. She is the founder and President of Foresight Valuation Group, an IP consulting and startup advisory firm providing valuation and strategy services for a range of purposes, including M&A, financial reporting, technology commercialization decisions, tax compliance, transfer pricing, and litigation damages. Ms. Kasznik has been a co-founder, CFO and advisor to several startups and incubators in the US and Europe, including the Stanford Venture Studio at the GSB. She is listed on the IAM 300 list of World Leading IP Strategists, and is Chair of the High Tech Sector, Licensing Executives Society.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; Kasznik, E. (PI)

STRAMGT 537: Leading Change in Public Education

Public education in America is at a crossroads. Does our education system have what it takes to produce graduates who are prepared for college, career, and citizenship in our increasingly digital and pluralistic world? Will income and ethnic achievement gaps continue to be pervasive and persistent in our nation's largest urban cities? Will family zip code determine educational destiny for the next generation of students? Which strategies and reforms are truly demonstrating results and which are merely passing fads? As in all large-scale enterprises undergoing rapid, transformative change, leadership matters greatly. Fortunately, over the last decade, the reform of American public education has been led by a number of innovative and results-oriented leaders at the state, district and charter levels. These leaders are bringing additional urgency, strategies, and ideas designed to prepare America's schools and students for the century ahead. Some ideas are proving to be critical levers for change, others are facing significant political challenges, and others have not delivered on expected results. Many of them hold lessons for how future educational leaders can contribute to transforming public education for the next generation of K-12 students. This course will focus on school system leadership for education reform. The course will provide an overview of the critical issues facing K-12 public education in America today, and what is going on across the U.S. during this transformative period of change. Once this context is set, students will study education leaders and systems change strategies from the last 10-15 years at the state, district and charter levels. We will focus on leaders across five domains: Leadership in crisis situations, strategic leadership, "china-breaking" leadership, sustaining leadership, and next generation leadership. We will also look at leadership examples from outside K-12 education to broaden our thinking about what leadership styles and strategies could be successfully applied to education. Students will debate the strategies and efficacy of how different leaders approached systems-level change and will form their own working hypotheses of what is needed to help transform the American education system. Case studies in school system leadership will form the primary basis for classroom assignments and discussion. We will examine what went right and what went wrong in each case, focusing particularly on the decisions that school system leaders faced and the implications of their decisions. Most cases will be supplemented with research publications, technical notes, news clips, and/or videos to deepen students¿ understanding of the context or issues discussed in the cases. Dan Katzir worked for Bain & Company, Teach for America, Sylvan Learning Systems and the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation before joining Alliance College-Ready Public Schools as its CEO in 2015. He is an experienced case study teacher and the editor of The Redesign of Urban School Systems: Case Studies in District Governance.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 538: Financial Technologies

This class will provide an overview of the rapidly evolving world of financial technologies. New market entrants are promising to change the way we borrow, save, invest, and transact. Incumbents enjoy substantial market power but are struggling to keep up technologically as they wrestle with antiquated core infrastructure. We will analyze the emerging competitive landscape and the strategic dynamics in play. The class will begin with a short review of digital platform economics in which we will cover basic concepts such as network effects and economies of scale. We will then dive into a series of case studies and industry analyses. Particular attention will be paid to the areas of payments, alternative credit, and virtual currencies.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 539: Leadership in the Arts and Creative Industries

Leaders of arts and creative organizations face unique challenges. Taking the perspective of the CEO, Chairman of the Board and Artistic/Creative Director, and drawing on various cases and in-class exercises, students will learn about advancing artistic excellence and creative innovation while expanding audiences and achieving financial goals. We will survey a variety of settings from non-profit museums and performing arts organizations to start-ups and large players in the music, theater and film industries. Among the topics explored will be governance and management; reaching multiple audiences; managing fiscal and creative tradeoffs; maintaining relevance in the age of online consumption; standing out in real and virtual spaces; and achieving growth amidst rising costs and diminishing revenues.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 543: Entrepreneurial Acquisition

For aspiring entrepreneurs who don't have a burning idea or desire to start a company from scratch, acquiring a small business can provide a direct route to running and growing a business. This class will explore entrepreneurial acquisition (EA). As the course covers topics such as what makes a good industry, raising capital, how to source deals, dealing with investors, due diligence, and negotiation, the course is also applicable to those interested in private equity, venture capital, start-ups, and general management. The class relies heavily on the case method, and each class includes guests (often the case protagonists) who bring practical and current experience to the classroom. The two group projects are intended to be highly practical, simulating real-world situations.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 544: Scaling Excellence

The premise of the course is that managers are concerned with how to scale excellence in organizations and that scaling skills are essential for any leadership role. It will be taught with Shantanu Narayen, the CEO of Adobe. The course is designed to appeal to a wide range of audiences: students seeking to build new organizations, or turn around poorly performing organizations, or grow existing organizations to greater heights. We will focus on how to transform the footprint of a firm, and yet, not lose the mindset. Executives also need to think about to spread 'good behaviors' and make them widespread very quickly, and conversely, on how to shrink bad behaviors and make them small very quickly. This course aims to train students into becoming effective leaders of organizational change. We will use a mix of cases written specially for the course, and 'live cases' with guest speakers from the C-Suite.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 545: Taking Social Innovation to Scale

How do you get the best new social innovations to reach the hundreds of millions of people who need it the most? And how do ensure that they are developed, deployed and scaled in a way that is relevant, appropriate and sustainable? Innovators tackling the world's most difficult problems often ignore, misunderstand, and under-invest in the critical business challenges involved in crossing "the middle of the value chain." This is innovation's valley of death: product and system adaption and evaluation; evidence generation and design validation; business and partnership planning; formal or informal regulatory approval and registration. How do you design, introduce, and optimize the intervention's uptake before it can be taken to scale by markets, governments or other systems? The class is taught be Steve Davis, President & CEO of PATH (www.path.org), a leader in global health innovation, and former global Director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company. We take an inter-disciplinary approach to look at the factors that pull innovation forward, push it from behind, and (often to the world's detriment) block its successful implementation and scaling. First grounding the discussion in research on innovation and social change, we then apply business principles, real world experiences and several important case studies in global health to examine the way good ideas get stuck, and how good ideas can turn into innovation that matters. We focus on root causes for failure, success factors, and business practices and tools to enable millions of lives to be impacted by social innovation. The seminar combines lectures, case studies, visiting practitioners and team projects focused on the business case for scaling specific social innovations. The goal is to help the next generation of social innovation leaders think more about some of the mistakes of the past, lessons for the future, and new ways of approaching old problems, all from a practitioner's point of view.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Davis, S. (PI)

STRAMGT 546: Strategies for Growth

This course will develop Business Strategy frameworks, some of which will be familiar from the core Strategy class and others of which will be new, and apply them to growing businesses. We will look at companies attempting to grow, as well as family businesses and some enterprises that will always be small. Each session, we will spend some time developing frameworks based on required reading. Then we will analyze individual companies using a combination of written case studies, video and audio excerpts of interviews with business owners, and guest speakers (or, if feasible, company visits). Issues we will consider include:nn- What makes a business scalable?nn- When are barriers to entry feasible and sustainable?nn- How can a firm differentiate itself? How might that limit growth?nn- What can small firms do effectively that large organizations cannot?nn- How do organizational issues such as incentives, hiring, and delegation limit growth and/or create advantages for small and growing enterprises?nnnGrades will be based on class participation, a group written assignment applying concepts from the class, and a take-home exam.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 547: Riding The Next Wave in Developing Economies

Today, innovative ventures in developing economies are providing compelling new products and services to a growing middle-class as well as to the lower part of the economic pyramid. These offerings provide consumers ways to better their lives and companies to grow their businesses. As older industries around the world are being disrupted, and entrepreneurial ecosystems in developing economies are evolving, entrepreneurs and investors now have reference points and "basecamps" to explore unique opportunities. These newly formed networks that include universities, incubators, accelerator programs, angel investor organizations and small venture capital firms are still lacking in breadth and depth, despite their attempts to follow the lead of Silicon Valley. Consequently, investors and founders face distinct and more numerous challenges that they would not encounter in Silicon Valley, such as small local markets, lack of scale-up funding, uncertain exit opportunities, inadequate talent pools and complex legal and political environments.Yet these developing economies are growing and becoming more connected. We are witnessing new technology-based products in these locations allowing problems to be solved at a scale never seen before. AI and machine learning, blockchain, smart sensors, IoT devices, natural language interfaces and AR and VR are just a few of the technologies not only being developed in Silicon Valley, but all over the world. Of course, smartphones, with their multi-faceted sensors, are now becoming ubiquitous. These trends present opportunities such as: replicating business models proven elsewhere; leapfrogging legacy technologies; targeting the base of the pyramid; and starting venture capital firms. Despite this fertile ground for new endeavors, success not only requires an exceptional product/market fit but great execution to start and scale a venture in problematic and sometimes adverse environments.This case-driven course is designed to help students identify new opportunities in developing economies around the world and across industries and to expose them to the challenges they will face. It is targeted at students who are thinking about creating, joining or investing in new ventures in developing economies.The cases and guests will reveal entrepreneurial challenges through the eyes of founders and investors who have seized these opportunities at different stages of the venture: ideation, launch and scaling. This course is designed to showcase innovative companies in high growth industries such as consumer internet, financial services, health care and education. It will feature the latest trends and opportunities in Asia, Eastern Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America. By taking this course, you will be better equipped to observe, explain and participate in developing economy ecosystems and the opportunities and challenges they present.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 549: Search Fund Garage

Search Fund Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course for students planning to pursue a search fund directly after or within a few years of graduation. Students will learn from the instructors, course peers, and class visitors, particularly top current search entrepreneurs, CEOs, attorneys and investors. This course is designed to assist students who are seriously pursuing a search fund, although some enrolled students will likely end up deciding not to pursue one. Those who have taken Entrepreneurial Acquisition (S543) or engaged in meaningful conversation with the teaching team will benefit the most from this more advanced, experiential course. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to or will already have raised search capital and launched their search, if they choose to do so. Pursuing custom self-developed work plans that target the aspect of the search fund path most relevant to them at the time of the course, students will evaluate and attract investors, structure their search entity, set up their process and outreach materials, identify attractive industries and companies, begin to reach out to business owners, and develop wisdom about what makes a deal attractive or unattractive, among other things. Students will work with business owners, mentors and industry experts to deeply understand the search fund model. Each student, or team, will contact real business owners and receive feedback on how they can be a more effective search fund entrepreneur. This course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. The class will combine the processes taught in Entrepreneurial Acquisition (S543) and detailed in the Primer on Search Funds (2016) with elements from the discovery process taught in Startup Garage (in particular, running preliminary experiments to test proposed methodologies). The course provides a supportive yet challenging environment that will help students step outside of their comfort zone and accelerate learning. By the end of the course each will be better prepared to launch a search than many of the searchers who have come before.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: ; Kelly, P. (PI); Risk, G. (SI)

STRAMGT 550: Global Value Chain Strategies

This course addresses how firms should structure and exploit their value chains as a competitive strategy. Structuring the value chain could involve decisions such as vertical integration which requires the firm to acquire key supply or customer operations, spinning off an internal operation or outsourcing a key operation, or merging with another firm that has similar products, services or markets. Exploiting the value chain could involve leveraging the value chain to enable faster product innovation, product development and launch, creation of new channels, or expanding to new markets. The course takes the perspective of senior management, possibly C-level executives, on how to develop strategies around such value chain issues.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 556: Venture Studio for Credit

Venture Studio for Credit is a self-guided project-based course in which students apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts. Students will work one-on-one with instructors and coaches to move through a workbook(s) and attend Thursday afternoon workshops where they will have team-to-team interaction. nnThis course integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. Outside of meetings and workshops, teams will get out of the building and interact directly with users to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.nnPrequalifications: 1. Projects must be exploring the commercialization of a technology innovation pioneered at a Stanford lab. 2. Teams must be a minimum of three people with at least one student enrolled for credit and representing a minimum of two schools. 3. All team members must be available to attend mandatory workshops on Thursdays from 3-4:20pm. Failure to meet all three prequalifications will result in an automatic drop.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

STRAMGT 567: Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation

This course examines individuals and organizations that use entrepreneurial skills and approaches to develop innovative responses to social problems. Entrepreneurship has traditionally been seen as a way of creating wealth for the entrepreneur and for those who back her/his work. Social entrepreneurs employ "entrepreneurial skills," such as finding opportunities, inventing new approaches, securing and focusing resources and managing risk, in the service of creating a social value. As the intensity and complexity of social and environmental problems has grown in recent years social entrepreneurship, defined as innovative, social value creating activity that can occur within or across the nonprofit, government or business sectors, has become increasingly prominent. While virtually all enterprises, commercial and social, generate social value, fundamental to this definition is that the primary focus of social entrepreneurship is to achieve social impact above all else. We will study some of the most promising and the best-proven innovations for improving people's lives. We will also examine mature projects that are now tackling the issue of "scale", moving from local innovations to solutions that create deep systemic changes for larger numbers of economically disadvantaged individuals and communities throughout the world. This year we will focus on what are the constraints and opportunities for creating a social enterprise at scale. The process of "scale" poses tremendous challenges. Even when organizations manage to overcome the many obstacles to growth, and achieve appreciable scale, this approach is seldom sufficient to achieve significant social impact on its own. This year our course will pay particular attention to network approaches which require the mobilization of a vast array of actors and resources, but have the potential to generate rapid and sustained social impact.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 573: Moore's Law and the Convergence of Computing and Communications; Strategic Thinking in Action

This six-session (2-unit) Bass seminar focuses on strategic leadership and builds on core strategic leadership coursework in the MBA program. The course uses the seminar format with expectations of extensive contributions from all students to the discussion in each session. Through seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the industry and organizational levels of analysis in dynamic environments. The seminar's aim is to improve participants¿ ability to develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring and workable. The seminar¿s conceptual frameworks include traditional tools of strategic and competitive analysis from the core MBA course on strategic leadership, conceptual frameworks developed by the instructors that help understand the role of strategy-making in the evolution and transformation of organizations and industries, and theoretical frameworks that help understand the interplays between technology strategy and corporate strategy. Three of the six session will feature discussions with senior executives from key industry players. The seminar's pedagogy involves informed debate including with the guest executives to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants as well as the writing and presentation of position papers by small groups of seminar participants concerning the seminar¿s analytical topics.In this fall's seminar we will examine the evolution of the global semiconductor industry in light of the ongoing impact of Moore's Law and the convergence of computing and wireless communications industries, and how it has been and will be affected by strategic actions of entrepreneurial startups, incumbent corporations, and governments in multiple geographies.Several interrelated topics will be discussed as they impact three key industry segments of the global semiconductor industry that are the focus of the seminar.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 574: Strategic Thinking in Action - In Business and Beyond (II)

This six-session Bass seminar is about strategic leadership driving the transformation of the advanced automotive industry. It will build on what students have learned in their MBA core strategic leadership course but will also provide additional conceptual frameworks developed by the instructors to help examine the major seminar topics. The seminar¿s pedagogy involves informed debate to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants. Consequently, there will be an expectation of extensive contributions from all students to the discussion in all of the sessions. Small groups of seminar participants will also be expected to write and present position papers concerning the seminar¿s analytical topics. The industry scope of the seminar is twofold: First, it is about autonomous, electric, and shared vehicles. And second, it is about the manufacturer and supplier incumbents as well as the tech industry and startup new-entrants. In the course of the seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the societal, industry and organizational levels of our analysis.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 579: The Political Economy of China

The evolving organization of the Chinese economy, with special emphasis on the following topics: the integration of the Communist Party organization with government entities and enterprises; the successive phases of market reform; the evolution of ownership and the nature of property rights; corporate restructuring and corporate governance; banking and finance; taxation and government revenue; the strengths and weaknesses of the national development model and the current domestic and international challenges to China's economic rise.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Walder, A. (PI)

STRAMGT 582: Building Strategic Competence: Observations from Battlegrounds Overseas and in Washington, D.C.

This course addresses the issues faced in assuming executive responsibility, developing clear visions and missions, understanding complex problem sets, building teams, and developing strategies to overcome obstacles and take advantage of opportunities. It is offered for students who might lead large, complex organizations or pursue opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business as well as those who want to serve in senior positions in government. The course draws on the experience of the lecturer as a general officer in the Army and as the 26th Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs to illuminate critical aspects of leadership, strategy development, and effective implementation. The course places personal experiences in historical context and in context of select leadership and management literature.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 583: The Challenges in/with China

The general objective of the course is to develop a better understanding of the changing socio-economic and political situation in China (with its challenges for China, for the United States and for the rest of the world). It should make then less difficult to define sustainable strategies for managing effectively in China and for handling the evolving interdependence between China and the US, between China and the rest of the world. From assessing critically the performance of China today, students will get an insight in the current complex dynamics of China renaissance/transformation, of its originality, and we will discuss current scenarios, with their business and socio-political consequences on the medium term. From this analysis and with a prospective perspective in mind, we will explore alternative approaches and propose responsible management practices required to build, overtime, a mutually rewarding, growing interdependence. More specifically, the course will initially identify the multi-causality behind China's achievements, its catching up process and discuss some of the dysfunctions associated, today, with such performance. The conditions of management effectiveness required to enter and succeed overtime in the Chinese market will be identified while the challenges faced by the global expansion of Chinese firms overseas (beyond the Belt and Road Initiative) will be illustrated. The course will rely upon different pedagogical methods; it will create conditions to share and leverage participants' experience and it will make use of a number of cases and research results.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: ; de Bettignies, H. (PI)

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who led Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Bannick, M. (PI)

STRAMGT 691: PhD Directed Reading (ACCT 691, FINANCE 691, GSBGEN 691, HRMGT 691, MGTECON 691, MKTG 691, OB 691, OIT 691, POLECON 691)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading.
Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

STRAMGT 692: PhD Dissertation Research (ACCT 692, FINANCE 692, GSBGEN 692, HRMGT 692, MGTECON 692, MKTG 692, OB 692, OIT 692, POLECON 692)

This course is elected as soon as a student is ready to begin research for the dissertation, usually shortly after admission to candidacy. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the research.
Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

STRAMGT 802: TGR Dissertation (ACCT 802, FINANCE 802, GSBGEN 802, HRMGT 802, MGTECON 802, MKTG 802, OB 802, OIT 802, POLECON 802)

Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
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