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STATS 32: Introduction to R for Undergraduates

This short course runs for weeks two through five of the quarter. It is recommended for undergraduate students who want to use R in the linguistics, humanities, social sciences or biological sciences and for students who want to learn the basics of R programming. The goal of the short course is to familiarize students with R's tools for scientific computing. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on learning by example, and assignments will be application-driven. No prior programming experience is needed. Topics covered include basic data structures, File I/O, graphs, control structures, etc, and some useful packages in R. Prerequisite: undergraduate student. Priority given to non-engineering students. Laptops necessary for use in class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tay, J. (PI)

STATS 60: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 101: Data Science 101

http://web.stanford.edu/class/stats101/ . This course will provide a hands-on introduction to statistics and data science. Students will engage with the fundamental ideas in inferential and computational thinking. Each week, we will explore a core topic comprising three lectures and two labs (a module), in which students will manipulate real-world data and learn about statistical and computational tools. Students will engage in statistical computing and visualization with current data analytic software (Jupyter, R). The objectives of this course are to have students (1) be able to connect data to underlying phenomena and to think critically about conclusions drawn from data analysis, and (2) be knowledgeable about programming abstractions so that they can later design their own computational inferential procedures. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Freshmen and sophomores interested in data science, computing and statistics are encouraged to attend. Open to graduates as well.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 110: Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences

Introduction to statistics for engineers and physical scientists. Topics: descriptive statistics, probability, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, nonparametric methods, linear regression, analysis of variance, elementary experimental design. Prerequisite: one year of calculus.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 116: Theory of Probability

Probability spaces as models for phenomena with statistical regularity. Discrete spaces (binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson). Continuous spaces (normal, exponential) and densities. Random variables, expectation, independence, conditional probability. Introduction to the laws of large numbers and central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and familiarity with infinite series, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 160: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 60)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 195: Introduction to R (CME 195)

This short course runs for four weeks beginning in the second week of the quarter and is offered in fall and spring. It is recommended for students who want to use R in statistics, science, or engineering courses and for students who want to learn the basics of R programming. The goal of the short course is to familiarize students with R's tools for scientific computing. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on learning by example, and assignments will be application-driven. No prior programming experience is needed. Topics covered include basic data structures, File I/O, graphs, control structures, etc, and some useful packages in R.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference

Modern statistical concepts and procedures derived from a mathematical framework. Statistical inference, decision theory; point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses; Neyman-Pearson theory. Bayesian analysis; maximum likelihood, large sample theory. Prerequisite: 116. http://statweb.stanford.edu/~sabatti/Stat200/index.html
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 202: Data Mining and Analysis

Data mining is used to discover patterns and relationships in data. Emphasis is on large complex data sets such as those in very large databases or through web mining. Topics: decision trees, association rules, clustering, case based methods, and data visualization. Prereqs: Introductory courses in statistics or probability (e.g., Stats 60), linear algebra (e.g., Math 51), and computer programming (e.g., CS 105).
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 206: Applied Multivariate Analysis

Introduction to the statistical analysis of several quantitative measurements on each observational unit. Emphasis is on concepts, computer-intensive methods. Examples from economics, education, geology, psychology. Topics: multiple regression, multivariate analysis of variance, principal components, factor analysis, canonical correlations, multidimensional scaling, clustering. Pre- or corequisite: 200.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Taylor, J. (PI); Ren, Z. (TA)

STATS 219: Stochastic Processes (MATH 136)

Introduction to measure theory, Lp spaces and Hilbert spaces. Random variables, expectation, conditional expectation, conditional distribution. Uniform integrability, almost sure and Lp convergence. Stochastic processes: definition, stationarity, sample path continuity. Examples: random walk, Markov chains, Gaussian processes, Poisson processes, Martingales. Construction and basic properties of Brownian motion. Prerequisite: STATS 116 or MATH 151 or equivalent. Recommended: MATH 115 or equivalent. http://statweb.stanford.edu/~adembo/math-136/
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dembo, A. (PI); Hui, Y. (TA)

STATS 222: Statistical Methods for Longitudinal Research (EDUC 351A)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat222/. Research designs and statistical procedures for time-ordered (repeated-measures) data. The analysis of longitudinal panel data is central to empirical research on learning, development, aging, and the effects of interventions. Topics include: measurement of change, growth curve models, analysis of durations including survival analysis, experimental and non-experimental group comparisons, reciprocal effects, stability. Prerequisite: intermediate statistical methods
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rogosa, D. (PI)

STATS 229: Machine Learning (CS 229)

Topics: statistical pattern recognition, linear and non-linear regression, non-parametric methods, exponential family, GLMs, support vector machines, kernel methods, model/feature selection, learning theory, VC dimension, clustering, density estimation, EM, dimensionality reduction, ICA, PCA, reinforcement learning and adaptive control, Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming, and policy search. Prerequisites: linear algebra, and basic probability and statistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 240: Statistical Methods in Finance

(SCPD students register for 240P.) Regression analysis and applications to investment models. Principal components and multivariate analysis. Likelihood inference and Bayesian methods. Financial time series. Estimation and modeling of volatilities. Statistical methods for portfolio management. Prerequisite: STATS 200 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 240P: Statistical Methods in Finance

For SCPD students; see 240.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 260A: Workshop in Biostatistics (BIODS 260A)

Applications of statistical techniques to current problems in medical science. To receive credit for one or two units, a student must attend every workshop. To receive two units, in addition to attending every workshop, the student is required to write an acceptable one page summary of two of the workshops, with choices made by the student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 285: Massive Computational Experiments, Painlessly

Ambitious Data Science requires massive computational experimentation; the entry ticket for a solid PhD in some fields is now to conduct experiments involving 1 Million CPU hours. Recently several groups have created efficient computational environments that make it painless to run such massive experiments. This course reviews state-of-the-art practices for doing massive computational experiments on compute clusters in a painless and reproducible manner. Students will learn how to automate their computing experiments first of all using nuts-and-bolts tools such as Perl and Bash, and later using available comprehensive frameworks such as ClusterJob and CodaLab, which enables them to take on ambitious Data Science projects. The course also features few guest lectures by renowned scientists in the field of Data Science. Students should have a familiarity with computational experiments and be facile in some high-level computer language such as R, Matlab, or Python.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 298: Industrial Research for Statisticians

Masters-level research as in 299, but with the approval and supervision of a faculty adviser, it must be conducted for an off-campus employer. Students must submit a written final report upon completion of the internship in order to receive credit. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: enrollment in Statistics M.S. program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 299: Independent Study

For Statistics M.S. students only. Reading or research program under the supervision of a Statistics faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 300A: Theory of Statistics I

Finite sample optimality of statistical procedures; Decision theory: loss, risk, admissibility; Principles of data reduction: sufficiency, ancillarity, completeness; Statistical models: exponential families, group families, nonparametric families; Point estimation: optimal unbiased and equivariant estimation, Bayes estimation, minimax estimation; Hypothesis testing and confidence intervals: uniformly most powerful tests, uniformly most accurate confidence intervals, optimal unbiased and invariant tests. Prerequisites: Real analysis, introductory probability (at the level of STATS 116), and introductory statistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 303: PhD First Year Student Workshop

For Statistics First Year PhD students only. Discussion of relevant topics in first year student courses, consultation with PhD advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Candes, E. (PI)

STATS 305A: Introduction to Statistical Modeling

Review of univariate regression. Multiple regression. Geometry, subspaces, orthogonality, projections, normal equations, rank deficiency, estimable functions and Gauss-Markov theorem. Computation via QR decomposition, Gramm-Schmidt orthogonalization and the SVD. Interpreting coefficients, collinearity, graphical displays. Fits and the Hat matrix, leverage & influence, diagnostics, weighted least squares and resistance. Model selection, Cp/Aic and crossvalidation, stepwise, lasso. Basis expansions, splines. Multivariate normal distribution theory. ANOVA: Sources of measurements, fixed and random effects, randomization. Emphasis on problem sets involving substantive computations with data sets. Prerequisites: consent of instructor, 116, 200, applied statistics course, CS 106A, MATH 114. (NB: prior to 2016-17 the 305ABC series was numbered as 305, 306A and 306B).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 310A: Theory of Probability I (MATH 230A)

Mathematical tools: sigma algebras, measure theory, connections between coin tossing and Lebesgue measure, basic convergence theorems. Probability: independence, Borel-Cantelli lemmas, almost sure and Lp convergence, weak and strong laws of large numbers. Large deviations. Weak convergence; central limit theorems; Poisson convergence; Stein's method. Prerequisites: 116, MATH 171.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 314A: Advanced Statistical Theory

Covers a range of topics, including: empirical processes, asymptotic efficiency, uniform convergence of measures, contiguity, resampling methods, Edgeworth expansions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 316: Stochastic Processes on Graphs

Local weak convergence, Gibbs measures on trees, cavity method, and replica symmetry breaking. Examples include random k-satisfiability, the assignment problem, spin glasses, and neural networks. Prerequisite: 310A or equivalent. https://web.stanford.edu/~montanar/TEACHING/Stat316/stat316.html
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 319: Literature of Statistics

Literature study of topics in statistics and probability culminating in oral and written reports. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 350: Topics in Probability Theory

See http://statweb.stanford.edu/~adembo/stat-350/concentration/ Selected topics of contemporary research interest in probability theory. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: 310A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dembo, A. (PI)

STATS 385: Theories of Deep Learning

The spectacular recent successes of deep learning are purely empirical. Nevertheless intellectuals always try to explain important developments theoretically. In this literature course we will review recent work of Burna and Mallat, Mhaskar and Poggio, Papyan and Elad, Bolsckei and co-authors, Baraniuk and co-authors, and others, seeking to build theoretical frameworks deriving deep networks as consequences. After initial background lectures, we will have some of the authors presenting lectures on specific papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 390: Consulting Workshop

Skills required of practicing statistical consultants, including exposure to statistical applications. Students participate as consultants in the department's drop-in consulting service, analyze client data, and prepare formal written reports. Seminar provides supervised experience in short term consulting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: course work in applied statistics or data analysis, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 398: Industrial Research for Statisticians

Doctoral research as in 399, but must be conducted for an off-campus employer. A final report acceptable to the advisor outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and any follow-up projects they expect to perform is required. The report is due at the end of the quarter in which the course is taken. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Statistics Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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